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Cache Of Thousands Of Ancient Roman Silver Coins Found In River

 
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Pillar of the Community
United States
8528 Posts
 Posted 11/28/2021  7:24 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
https://www.newsweek.com/cache-thou...iver-1653112

"A hoard of 5,600 silver coins from the Roman Empire dating back nearly 2,000 years has been found in Germany.

The Augsburg Art Collections and Museum said in a statement the discovery was the largest such find in the southern German state of Bavaria. The silver coins minted in the denarii Roman currency were discovered in an old, gravel riverbed near the location of what was once an early military base.

The coins, which weigh 33 pounds in total, were discovered during excavation work after floods in the small town of Wertach flushed them out. The statement said that the oldest of the coins were minted under Emperor Nero (A.D. 54-68) and the most recently minted under Septimius Severus, shortly after A.D. 200...

...Archeologists also discovered coins from the eras of Emperors Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius as well as coins from the era of Didius Iulianus, who was only emperor for nine weeks before being murdered in A.D. 193."
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United States
2450 Posts
 Posted 11/28/2021  7:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nfine to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
...as well as coins from the era of Didius Iulianus, who was only emperor for nine weeks before being murdered in A.D. 193


Just amazing. They were able to get legislation written, sponsored and passed, commissions formed, designs submitted and agreed upon, and coins manufactured and distributed in less than 9 weeks.
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United States
1339 Posts
 Posted 11/28/2021  8:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kushanshah to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Didius Julianus was high bidder for the throne, literally sold at auction by the Praetorian Guard. His bid was a promise to pay 25,000 sestertii (6,250 denarii) to every soldier in the Roman army. He needed a lot of coins. Quickly. There was less red tape in the second century.
Edited by Kushanshah
11/28/2021 8:45 pm
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Australia
14024 Posts
 Posted 11/28/2021  9:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There were coins struck in the name of emperors who only "reigned" for a few hours. In an era before the Internet or even newspapers, when the coinage was one of the primary means of communication, having coins struck in your name was one of the first things you did after becoming emperor.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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 Posted 11/28/2021  10:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
There were coins struck in the name of emperors who only "reigned" for a few hours.
Can't think of any cases of hours (were there?), but days, yes. IIRC 9 weeks isn't even that short for a Roman emperor reign, there were like half a dozen that were shorter.

In a few medieval contexts we know of coins being struck in the names of pretenders who weren't actually ruling yet (or sometimes ever). To an extent I guess the same applies to Roman usurpers; some of them were basically "this guy took over a mint city and asked them to make coins in their name".
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 Posted 11/28/2021  11:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Can't think of any cases of hours (were there?), but days, yes. IIRC 9 weeks isn't even that short for a Roman emperor reign, there were like half a dozen that were shorter.

We don't really know how for how long Domitian II was in "power", but it can't have been more than a couple of days because otherwise it would have been mentioned in one of the surviving histories. It seems he was proclaimed emperor in the evening, and by next morning he had second thoughts and renounced his claim (or was assassinated; again, we don't really know). As it is, we only know of the existence of this emperor at all because of the two surviving examples of his coins.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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