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Silver 2 Cent Coin - Please Help, Is It Real Or Not

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 7 / Views: 390Next Topic  
New Member
New Zealand
2 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2022  8:31 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Gabbynlib to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi everyone, I'm new here and pleased to be accepted to the site as I have a question for you all that may help me. 40 years ago my dad received a 1967 silver 2 cent coin as change in a pub. We were amazed at it as kids and I thought he had lost it or something. I have since inherited his coin collection and was amazed to still see it there. I am hoping to find out if it is genuine or not or whether there was a miss-minting of these back then. Would anyone know or is there any way of testing it to find out if its genuine? Any advice and help would be appreciated. There are a couple of pics attached.
Thanks in advance
Glenn Bryan

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United States
23312 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2022  8:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@gabby, that is pretty interesting. Do you have a way to measure the weight of the silver-colored coin? If so, please post that info on this thread as it should help us to figure out what you have there. Thx.
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"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
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Pillar of the Community
Australia
2004 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2022  9:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mr T to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's most likely painted or coated, but there was a lot happening at The Royal Mint in 1967 so anything is possible.
I'm not sure what the easiest way to tell its composition is - scratching it would tell you for sure, but I think you can measure the specific gravity somehow? Hopefully bronze and cupronickel have different enough specific gravities to work out what you have.
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1107 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2022  9:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coaster to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Gabbynlib and

I'd say PMD (Post Mint Damage). It looks as though some of the underlying bronze is showing through the plating in some places.
New Member
New Zealand
2 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2022  10:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Gabbynlib to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for your advice and thoughts. I don't have a scale small enough to go beyond a gram but it weighed in at 4g as did a copper 2 cent. The actual listed weight is 4.14g and I'm not sure what the variance would be if it was cupro-nickel. Looks like it is coated. Pretty clever I think as it has barely worn off over 40 years.
Thanks again.
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Australia
14270 Posts
 Posted 01/15/2022  10:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hello and welcome.

I would agree that it's most likely been plated.

I own an Australian "silver 2 cent coin" that my Dad made years ago as a chemistry demonstration. It's been plated with zinc.

On plated coins, there is, almost always, a small gap or hole in the plating, where the wire was attached during the electroplating process. On your coin I can see this hole, it's at the top of the reverse (flower side), on the rim - there's a long strip where the bronze is showing through the plating.

The easiest test for a "wrong metal planchet" mint error is to weigh it; a true wrong metal planchet error will not weigh exactly the same as a perfectly normal coin of the same type. So get yourself a balance capable of measuring to two decimal places, place your coin on it and weigh it, then get a regular NZ 2 cent piece and weigh it too. If the weights are the same, then it's a plate job.

Plating coins like this is technically a form of counterfeiting and therefore illegal, since it is possible to try to pass the coin for one of higher denomination (in this case, a 2 cent piece is about the same size as an old 10 cent piece), which is probably how your dad acquired it in the first place.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Valued Member
Australia
441 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2022  03:17 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add echidna to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The bronze is visible under the plating/coating in a couple of places.
Ride due west as the sun sets. Turn left at the Rocky Mountains.
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United States
112441 Posts
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