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Teach Me The Secrets.

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Pillar of the Community

United States
591 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2022  8:31 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add NumismaticsFTW to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hey folks

Recently I purchased some coins and they interacted with something that made them tone wonderfully!

Interestingly enough, I've heard people do this naturally to speed up the process.

I'm not referring to those terrible ones flooded on ebay right now, but rather the ones that make it in a problem free holder.

I know this isn't an over night thing, but years possibly.

There has to be tons of collectors, dealers etc. on this forum that know how.

It would be greatly appreciated if you let me in on some of your secrets to success.

Thanks!

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 Posted 06/23/2022  8:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


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 Posted 06/23/2022  8:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ijn1944 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Some will insert coins into holes in old (but somewhat fresh/not worn out) Whitman folders and place them on a high shelf in close proximity to a water heater. Leave them there for a year or two, then voila...
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United States
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 Posted 06/23/2022  10:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MisterT to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Old time collectors of silver coins used to dust the folders with sulfur to achieve toning over time. Almost anything containing sulfur will tone a coin. Onions contain sulfur as does a hard boiled egg. If you want to experiment, try taking a bullion silver eagle, place it in a covered container with a fresh hot hard boiled egg that has been chopped up and watch the pretty tones that appear. Sometimes however the sulfur will do nothing more than darken or blacken the surfaces.
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Pillar of the Community
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 Posted 06/23/2022  10:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bump111 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Quickly achieved toning isn't necessarily stable. It will look nice for a little while, but you may not be able to predict what the terminal stage will be. That's one reason why people want to know if toning is natural or "artificial". Some of these "monster toned" coins that people are going crazy over these days will end up being just monsters in a few years I'm afraid.
"Nummi rari mira sunt, si sumptus ferre potes." - Christophorus filius Scotiae
Valued Member
United States
139 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2022  10:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SpeedDemonND to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I never understood why people like toning so much. Then again, that's the beauty of this hobby. We all like and collect different things, and there is no right or wrong way to do it. Still, the appeal escapes me. I personally find it distracting.
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United States
1776 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2022  10:55 pm  Show Profile   Check jacrispies's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add jacrispies to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Some will insert coins into holes in old (but somewhat fresh/not worn out) Whitman folders and place them on a high shelf in close proximity to a water heater.

I can't imagine in a million years attractive whitman folder toning. I've seen many silver collections held in the old whitman folders, and they are usually splotchy dark brown and black toned.

Maybe some kind of velvet that the coin can be set on, then flipped over after a month or so?

Artificial toning achieved through the sulfer in eggs or something alike provides an unnatural rainbow toning that will most certainly prevent it from getting into a problem free holder.
Edited by jacrispies
06/23/2022 10:58 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
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 Posted 06/23/2022  11:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add thq to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Retoning can take a shiny polished coin back to an aged appearance sometimes. Striking matches next to the coin face will give it a hit of soot and sulfur and darken it, expecially in creviced areas like the eagle feathers on a Walker. It doesn't fix the polish completely but it makes the coin show better.
"Two minutes ago I would have sold my chances for a tired dime." Fred Astaire
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 Posted 06/24/2022  12:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
We all like and collect different things, and there is no right or wrong way to do it.


Well said.
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
Pillar of the Community
United States
3627 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2022  12:27 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Slider23 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There are no secrets as you most likely already know the answer to natural toned coins. How and where are coins stored? Paper rolls, envelopes, canvas bags, paper flips, coin albums, wood cabinet, cigar box, jewelry box, etc. These type of storage areas often have a high sulfur content. For example, the Wayte Ramond albums are know for creating some nice rainbow toning. If you want to create toners, you need to place coins in common storage areas that are going to create results that you want. The TPG graders can identify toning patterns from common storage areas of coins. The late Eric P. Newman stored coins all over his house in albums, rolls, flips, cabinets, boxes, envelopes to see how different storage environment toned coins.



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 Posted 06/24/2022  12:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Yokozuna to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I understand that it's natural to want to sell your coins for more than you paid for them, and toning is one of those subjective
"additions" to the way a coin looks and can change its perceived value, but it's more of a question of being a true numismatist to me. My father was the reason I started collecting and he always said we should make sure a coin's condition is preserved for the future collectors that will end up with our coins long after we are gone.

Will you be telling your buyers that the coins you sell were "enhanced" by some process that changed the way they toned? What happens if they take them to a dealer or send them in to be certified and then find that they are not what they thought they were?

It should be the goal of a numismatist to preserve the coins we collect so they are as close to the condition we find them in as possible. Toning is something that happens. Once you introduce a substance or process into that equation, you will have a coin that is Artificially Toned. Most of the time it's easy to tell an AT coin from natural toning.

The Third-Party Grading companies should be able to tell artificial toning from natural toning in 99.99% of the cases. The coins that are questionable will be noted as just that, questionable toning or color.

ANA Member ID: 3203813 - CONECA Member ID: N-5637
"Shine, shine a Roosevelt dime. All the way to Baltimore and runnin' out of time." Tom Waits-Clap Hands



Valued Member
Canada
291 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2022  12:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add cdngmt to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Along the lines of what Mister T said I've been told by dealer(s) that storing coins near a natural gas furnace creates toning ( for the same reason )
Bedrock of the Community
United States
45154 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2022  05:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Read up on the "paper napkin" Methode. I think it was Taco Bell napkins.
John1
( I'm no pro, it's just my humble opinion )
Searched 6.5 +/- Million Cents Since 1971
Valued Member
United States
357 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2022  05:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bugil46 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I really like finding natural toned coins.
Will the above mentioned methods work on all metals?
I'm curious about Lincoln cents. Does it help with cleaned coins?
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United States
8548 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2022  07:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ijn1944 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
On the matter of Whitman folders. I have two silver Mercury dime collections in beat-up Whitman folders put together long, long ago. The majority of these dimes show a subtle dark rainbow bullseye toning. I can't vouch for Whitman toning for every coin type, but I've seen it with dimes, and occasionally wheat cents.
Edited by ijn1944
06/24/2022 07:15 am
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