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Post Your Coins/Medals/Tokens That Are Intentionally Dual-Dated

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 Posted 08/10/2022  07:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Arkansas Statehood Centennial commemorative coin program was another multi-year program; it began in 1935 (one year prior to the State's actual Centennial year) and continued through 1939 (three years after). It also had a second design type approved by Congress and signed into law by US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt - a one-year issue for 1936 that featured a portrait of Arkansas Senator Joseph T. Robinson. Arkansas became the 25th State of the Union on June 15, 1836.

All Arkansas issues - both Types - carry the dual dates of "1836" and "1936" on their reverse. On the Type I coins. the dates are in the field to the left of the conjoined portraits of a circa 1836 Native American chief and a circa 1936 Miss Liberty. On the Type II coins (the Senator Robinson design), the dual dates are to the right of Robinson's portrait at the rim. (Note: The US Mint considers the side with the eagle to be the coin's obverse.)

The coin's obverse also bears a year date, it represents the year of striking for the coin (1935 through 1939). So, the coin is actually triple-dated vs. dual-dated!

1935-39 Arkansas Statehood Centennial - Type I


1935-39 Arkansas Statehood Centennial - Type II - Senator Robinson



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Arkansas half dollar program, see: Commems Collection.



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 Posted 08/11/2022  07:05 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Hudson Sesquicentennial half dollar was struck to help mark the 150th anniversary of the founding of Hudson, NY; Hudson received its City Charter in 1785. The coin is often described as having the most whimsical designs of the classic-era series.

The coin's reverse design, based on the then-current seal of the City of Hudson, features Neptune, the Roman god of the sea, holding a trident while sitting backward on a spouting whale; a mermaid blowing a conch shell is seen in the background at left. The dual dates of "1785-1935" are seen below Neptune and the whale at the coin's lower rim. (Note: Unfortunately, the present-day seal of the city no longer includes Neptune or a mermaid).

The obverse of the coin depicts Henry Hudson's ship, the Half Moon with a fanciful crescent moon in the background at left. Hudson, an English navigator and explorer sailing for the Dutch East India Company in 1609, explored the river that now bears his name in the Half Moon; he was actually in search of the Northwest Passage to the Orient to facilitate easier spice trading vs. seeking potential new settlement locations. He is believed, however, to be the first European explorer to come upon the site that would ultimately become Hudson, NY.

1935 Hudson, NY Sesquicentennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Hudson Sesquicentennial coin, see: Commems Collection.



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 Posted 08/11/2022  07:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1935 Old Spanish Trail commemorative half dollar features the dual dates "1535-1935". The 16th century date is nearly pure fiction.

The coin was ostensibly struck to commemorate "the four hundredth anniversary of the Expedition of Cabeza de Vaca and the opening of the Old Spanish Trail." If we overlook the made up anniversary date for a moment, there is also the problem of the "Old Spanish Trail" being the name associated with a trail that connected Santa Fe, New Mexico with southern California; it developed in the late 1820s / early 1830s (not 1500s). The creation of the trail was largely driven by the desire/need to link Santa Fe and Los Angeles for trading purposes vs. a trip of potential exploration. Cabeza de Vaca wandered the American Southwest for years after the expedition he was part of failed (he was not the leader of the original expedition). For more details on this, check out: 1935 Old Spanish Trail - Origin Story.

The trail shown on the reverse of the coin was never part of the Old Spanish Trail trade route through the western expanse of the future US states of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Nevada and California; it did, however, somewhat trace a portion of Cabeza de Vaca's journey/wanderings. The coin's dual dates appear on its reverse at the lower rim below the yucca tree and map.

The obverse design of the coin presents a cow's skull - representative of the literal English translation of Cabeza de Vaca,

1935 Old Spanish Trail



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Spanish Trail half dollar, see: Commems Collection.


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 Posted 08/11/2022  07:54 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As part of its planned celebrations, the Connecticut Tercentenary Commission sponsored a commemorative half dollar to mark the 300th anniversary of the founding of the Connecticut Colony in 1635.

The coin's obverse design (per the US Mint) features a bold, standing eagle facing left. Its reverse design depicts the famous Charter Oak, the hiding place for the colony's Royal Charter when an attempt was made by King James II (through his local administrator Sir Edmund Andros) to revoke it. Both designs, created for the half dollar by Henry Kreiss, are based on paintings by Charles De Wolf Bromwell.

The coin's dual dates of "1635-1935" are seen on its reverse, under the Charter Oak at the lower rim.

1935 Connecticut Tercentenary



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Connecticut half dollar, see: Commems Collection.



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 Posted 08/11/2022  08:02 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add JimmyD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Commemorating the Queens 50th Anniversary of ascending to the throne.

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 Posted 08/11/2022  10:11 am  Show Profile   Check nss-52's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add nss-52 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
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 Posted 08/11/2022  2:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ttkoo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@Commems,
Beautiful 1935 50cent!

I'm sure you already know, but I'd be wanting a correction done by PCGS on that slab to spell Connecticut properly.
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 Posted 08/11/2022  3:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I'm sure you already know, but I'd be wanting a correction done by PCGS on that slab to spell Connecticut properly.

@ttko: Thanks for checking in and the kind words.

The question of "Connecticut" being spelled correctly comes up from time to time (also for the Long Island half dollar)...

It's not a misprint or spelling mistake. At the time, that is how PCGS spelled/abbreviated "Connecticut" on their insert to make it conform with its defined character limit. (The 1936 Long Island Tercentenary half dollar also had an unusual spelling - "Long Islan" - dropping the "d" to stay within the 10-character limit.) Since that time, the company has implemented a new format for their inserts and "Connecticut" is now spelled out in its entirety - so is "Long Island".



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 Posted 08/11/2022  4:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
nss-52: Nice medal! I like it! (Very interesting thread as well. I've enjoyed it each time I've viewed it.)


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Edited by commems
08/11/2022 4:28 pm
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 Posted 08/11/2022  7:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's a dual-dated commemorative silver dollar issued by Canada - the 1984 Toronto Sesquicentennial.

The coin was issued to mark the 150th anniversary of the incorporation of Toronto; the incorporation took place on March 6, 1834.

The coin was struck by the Royal Canadian Mint and features the dual dates of "1834" and "1984" on its commemorative reverse underneath the First Nations person paddling in a canoe; the circa-1984 skyline of Toronto, with the dominating CN Tower, is seen in the background - it completes the coin's then-and-now theme.

The coin's obverse design features a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II.

1984 Toronto Sesquicentennial Silver Dollar - Commemorative Reverse
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I previously made a brief post about this Royal Canadian Numismatic Association Convention souvenir, you can read it here:

1984 Toronto Silver Dollar - Convention Souvenir



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Edited by commems
08/11/2022 7:38 pm
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 Posted 08/12/2022  07:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Albany, NY commemorative half dollar is another classic-era coin that celebrates an event from the United States' colonial days - the 250th anniversary of Albany, NY receiving its charter. Albany is the second oldest chartered city in the US, having received its Charter in 1686; New York City was the first city to receive its Charter, just three months before Albany.

The obverse of the coin features a beaver, symbolic of the Albany area's first major industry - the trapping and trading of beaver pelts. The reverse of the coin features (at left) Thomas Dongan, the Governor of the Province of New York in 1686; it was Dongan who signed the Albany Charter. To the right are seen two men: Peter Schuyler, the Head of the Commissioners for Indian Affairs in the area, he would also become the first mayor of Albany (he is depicted holding the Charter); and Robert Livingston, who was the Secretary for Indian Affairs.

The coin is another "triple date" coin, with the year of its initial settlement (1614), the year of its Charter (1686) and the year of the coin's striking (1936) all to be found within the reverse design.

1936 Albany, NY 250th Anniversary


Albany, NY Charter Anniversary Booklet -- Cover



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Albany half dollar, see: Commems Collection.


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 Posted 08/12/2022  07:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 100th anniversary of the 1836 incorporation of Bridgeport, CT was commemorated with a US half dollar in 1936.

The Bridgeport commemorative coin was designed by Henry Kreiss, who also designed the Connecticut Tercentenary half dollar that I posted yesterday. The coin's obverse features a left-facing portrait of Phineas Taylor (PT) Barnum - Bridgeport's most famous resident. The coin's reverse design depicts a very modern-looking eagle that reflects contemporary Art Deco inspirations.

The coin's dual dates of "1836-1936" are found underneath the portrait of Barnum on the obverse.


1936 Bridgeport, CT Centennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Bridgeport coin, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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