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Post Your Coins/Medals/Tokens That Are Intentionally Dual-Dated

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 Posted 08/12/2022  07:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The next US commemorative coin with a dual date is considered by many to be the most controversial issue of the entire series - the 1936 Cincinnati Music Center 50th Anniversary half dollar.

Why is it controversial?

Two big reasons:

1. There wasn't any event of significance that took place as part of Cincinnati's music scene in 1886 that made it a "Center of Music," and

2. Songwriter Stephen Foster, the man whose portrait is seen on the coin's obverse, was only a brief resident of Cincinnati (he was born in Pittsburgh, PA and lived most of his life there or in New York City) and did not contribute meaningfully to the city's music-related history - he wrote the vast majority of his songs elsewhere.

I've written about the controversies before, so check out the "Commems Collection" link below to learn more.

The coin's reverse design incorporates the "1836" and "1936" dual dates - they flank a modern-day, created-for-the-coin Goddess of Music holding/playing an ancient lyre. Though the design strives to give the impression of linkage to Greek or Roman mythology, there is no such Greek or Roman goddess. It was another questionable decision associated with the coin - trying to create the illusion of ancient mythology.

1936 Cincinnati, OH Music Center 50th Anniversary



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history, design and controversies of the Cincinnati half dollar, see: Commems Collection.




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
08/12/2022 07:45 am
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 Posted 08/12/2022  09:50 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
More beautiful examples!


Quote:
The question of "Connecticut" being spelled correctly comes up from time to time (also for the Long Island half dollar)...
Thank you for bringing that up. I am sure you had given that explanation before, but I seemed to have forgotten it since then.
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 Posted 08/12/2022  1:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I am sure you had given that explanation before...

I have, but it's no bother to repeat it. It's a logical question upon seeing the insert.


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 Posted 08/12/2022  2:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
but it's no bother to repeat it.
For this I am glad because you are always helpful.
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 Posted 08/13/2022  09:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cleveland, OH celebrated the 100th anniversary of its 1836 incorporation in 1936, and staged the Great Lakes Exposition as part of the celebration.

Taking advantage of the situation, Thomas G. Melish, entrepreneur and coin enthusiast, created the Cleveland Centennial Commemorative Coin Association and successfully lobbied Congress to authorize the US Mint to strike a commemorative half dollar. The Association was not connected with any official group planning/staging Cleveland's anniversary celebrations nor the Great Lakes Exposition. Net proceeds from sale of the coins went to Melish and those working closely with him.

On its obverse is a left-facing bust of General Moses Cleaveland, the man who led the expedition that surveyed the area and created a layout for the city's original settlement. The reverse design of the coin presents a map of the Great Lakes area with its major port cities noted via stars. The largest star - with the large compass pointing to it - represents Cleveland. The coin was designed by Brenda Putnam.

The dual dates of "1836" and "1936" are found on the reverse, at the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock positions. As they are presented using a smaller and thinner font than the rest of the commemorative inscriptions at the rim, they can be easily overlooked.

1936 Cleveland, OH Centennial / Great Lakes Exposition



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Cleveland coin, see: Commems Collection.




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/13/2022  09:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Columbia, SC Sesquicentennial Half Dollar was struck to mark the city's 150th anniversary as the capital of South Carolina.

The dual dates of "1786" and "1936" are seen on the obverse on either side of the standing figure of Lady Justice who is depicted holding a balance scale in her upraised left hand while holding a sword, pointed down, in her right hand.

The two official-looking buildings depicted in the background on the obverse are the Second SC State House (i.e., Capitol Building), first occupied in 1790, on the left, with the SC State House of 1936 on the right. The South Carolina General Assembly voted to move the State capital from Charleston to the under-construction Columbia in 1786, but did not move immediately as the new State House in Columbia was still under construction.

The reverse of the coin depicts a palmetto tree as its central design element. Wood from local palmetto trees was used in the construction of the fort built on Sullivan's Island intended to protect Charleston, SC from enemy ships.

1936 Columbia, SC Sesquicentennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Columbia, SC half dollar, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/13/2022  09:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Up next is the 1936 US commemorative half dollar marking the 300th anniversary of the Landing of the Swedes in Delaware (in present-day Wilmington, DE).

On the coin's obverse is seen the Old Swedes Church (built in 1698 and still in use today as a house of worship) and on its reverse is the sailing ship the Kalmar Nyckel; the ship brought the original Swedes and Finns who settled the colony from Europe. The coin's dual "1638-1938" dates are seen below the sailing ship on the reverse.

Looking closely at the coin, a "1936" is seen on the obverse in addition to the dual dates on the reverse. The apparent date mix up on the coin owes itself to the fact that the Act for the coin was passed in 1936 and it stipulated the coin was to bear the year of enactment regardless of when struck or issued. So, a 1936-dated coin was struck for a 1938 anniversary event.

1936 Delaware Tercentenary



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Delaware half dollar, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/13/2022  5:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's a collector coin from Canada - it commemorates the 80th anniversary of formal, official friendship between Canada and Japan - it celebrates the 1929 opening of Canada's first diplomatic office in Asia - in Tokyo, Japan. The dual dates of "1929" and "2009" are seen on the coin's reverse, to the right of the two deer.

The coin's reverse design is fully allegorical, using local flora and fauna to represent each country - a white-tailed deer and maple tree for Canada (at right), and a shika deer and cherry blossom tree for Japan. The two deer stand side-by-side, to symbolize the friendly, harmonious relations between the two countries. To the left of the shika deer is seen the Japanese character "Wa" which translates into English as "harmony."

The coin's obverse features a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II.

2009 Canada-Japan Friendship Silver $5 Coin
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For more about the coin and a related medal, check out:

- 2009 80th Anniversary Of Canada, Japan Friendship Silver $5 Coin







Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/14/2022  05:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ttkoo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A truly beautiful coin IMO, thanks for showing.
The Ox moves slowly, but the Earth is patient.
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 Posted 08/14/2022  07:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Elgin, IL Centennial Half Dollar was struck to mark the 100th anniversary of the founding of Elgin, Illinois, as well as be a fundraiser to support the casting in bronze of the city's Pioneer Memorial statue by local sculptor Trygve Rovelstad - a plaster version of the statue had been prepared; Rovelstad also designed the coin.

The coin's dual dates are "1673" paired with "1936" and are seen below the left-facing portrait of the "father" pioneer on the obverse; the bust is taken from the Pioneer family depicted in the statue presented on the coin's reverse. This is an odd pairing of dates for a couple of reasons: 1) Though the coin was authorized, minted and distributed in 1936, it was actually in 1935 that Elgin, IL celebrated the centennial of its founding; and 2) The "1673" date on the coin has no relation to Elgin, it marks the year in which Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet traveled the Mississippi River and passed through what is now the State of Illinois.

1936 Elgin, IL Centennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Elgin Centennial coin, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/14/2022  07:16 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Battle of Gettysburg 75th Anniversary Half Dollar was struck to mark the anniversary one of the most important battles of the US Civil War. The three-day Battle of Gettysburg is acknowledged as the Civil War battle with the highest number of casualties and, with the North emerging victorious, the point in the war at which the North began to take firm control of its outcome.

The coin's obverse features right-facing, conjoined portraits of a Union soldier (foreground) and a Confederate soldier (background); the portraits are unnamed and are meant to be representative of each side's forces. The coin's reverse presents the Union (left) and Confederate (right) shields along with a commemorative inscription. Embedded within the inscription - at the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock positions - are the dual dates of "1863" and "1938" - the dates represent the accurate milestone years of the anniversary. The reverse also includes the year the coin was struck "1936." The coin was designed by Frank Vittor.

It was another case of the coin being authorized "early" and its legislation mandating that the coin bear the date of the year in which it was authorized - regardless of when struck or issued. Another triple-date US commemorative coin!

1936 Battle of Gettysburg 75th Anniversary



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Gettysburg half dollar, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
08/14/2022 07:22 am
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 Posted 08/14/2022  07:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Lynchburg, VA Sesquicentennial Half Dollar is one of four coins in the classic US commemorative series to feature the portrait of a living person - Senator Carter Glass. It was struck to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the founding of Lynchburg and the granting of its Charter (in 1786). Lynchburg traces its roots to the ferry service across the Fluvanna (now James) River that John Lynch started on his father's land in 1757 - roughly 30 years before the Town Charter was granted - the settlement (village) surrounding the ferry's location was originally known as Lynch's Ferry.

The coin's obverse depicts the aforementioned left-facing portrait of Senator Glass. He did not want his portrait to appear on the coin, but the Lynchburg Sesquicentennial Association prevailed and, as a result, we have the coin with which we are familiar.

The reverse of the coin features a standing Lady Liberty with welcoming, outstretched arms; in the background is seen the old Lynchburg Courthouse (which today is a museum about Lynchburg). The dual dates of "1786" and "1936" flank Lady Liberty just below her knees. The coin is the work of Charles Keck.

1936 Lynchburg, VA Sesquidentennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Lynchburg half dollar, see: Commems Collection.


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 Posted 08/14/2022  08:54 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

As in many early commemoratives the moderns have many dual dated coins too.




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 Posted 08/14/2022  08:56 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1996 Smithsonian $5



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 Posted 08/15/2022  06:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@muddler: Nice coins! Thanks for posting!

The engraved detail on the Capitol dome on the Bicentennial of Congress Half Eagle is tremendous. The Congress coin was among the first modern US gold commemorative coins that I added to my collection.




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
08/15/2022 06:56 am
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