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Post Your Coins/Medals/Tokens That Are Intentionally Dual-Dated

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 Posted 08/17/2022  07:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 250th anniversary of the founding/settling of New Rochelle, NY was celebrated in 1938 with a US commemorative half dollar. It was a local event rather than one of national significance (i.e., questionable in terms of appropriateness for a US coin), but the coin's bill was nonetheless passed by the US Congress.

The obverse of the coin features Lord Pell receiving "one fatt calfe" (presumably the first) as part of the payment for the land he sold to those seeking to establish a permanent settlement in the area. The reverse of the coin features a French fleur-de-lis which can be found on the Seal of New Rochelle as well as on the Seal of Port of La Rochelle (in France) - the US city's namesake. The coin was designed by Gertrude Lathrop who also designed the 1936 Albany Charter half-dollar.

The coin is a triple-date coin, with the dual dates of "1688" (Settlement) and "1899" (Incorporation) seen on the obverse, and "1938" (Anniversary Year; Year Mandated by Coin Act) on the reverse along with all required mottoes and inscriptions.

1938 New Rochelle, NY 250th Anniversary



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the New Rochelle half dollar, see: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/17/2022  07:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In 1946, the last Statehood Centennial half dollar of the classic-era US commemorative coins was issued - it celebrated the 100th anniversary of Iowa joining the Union on December 28, 1846 - it joined as the 29th State.

The coin features the Old Stone Capitol in Iowa City on its obverse; this building served as the center of government for the last days of the Iowa Territory and first days of the State of Iowa; the state capital was subsequently moved to Des Moines in 1857 and the building became the first building of what is now Iowa State University.

The coin's reverse design takes the eagle from the State Seal and adds 29 stars above it to symbolize Iowa's order in the Union. The coin's dual dates of "1846" (Statehood) and "1946" (Year Struck) are seen on the reverse at the lower rim.

Adam Pietz, a former Assistant Engraver at the US Mint, was the designer and sculptor of the coin.

1946 Iowa Statehood Centennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Iowa Statehood half dollar, see: Commems Collection.




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 Posted 08/17/2022  07:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The US Congress authorized a commemorative half dollar to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the independence of Texas from Mexico - an event from 1836; coins were struck for the anniversary from 1934 to 1938, inclusive. Note: The coin does not commemorate the centennial of Texas Statehood - Texas joined the Union in 1845 after nearly a decade of being an independent republic.

The obverse design of the coin features a large, five-pointed star (symbolic of Texas, the Lone Star State) with a bald eagle perched in front of it. Seen below the eagle is a single date, that of the year of striking/issue.

The coin's busy reverse design includes multiple elements related to Texas and its fight for independence. Kneeling at the design's center is the allegorical winged female figure of the Goddess of Victory. Her left arm rests on the Alamo, the battle site that, even in defeat, helped inspire the Texans/Texians as they fought for their independence ("Remember the Alamo!"); To Victory's left (viewer's right) is a cameo portrait of Stephen F. Austin - the "Father of Texas." To Victory's right (viewer's left) is a cameo portrait of Sam Houston, the first Commander-in-Chief of the Texas Army, the first President of the Texas Republic after it declared independence and a US Senator from Texas after it became a State in 1845.

Above Victory is seen "LIBERTY" on a banner/scroll along with the six different national flags that have flown over Texas: 1. Spain (1519-1685; 1690-1821), 2. France (1685-1690), 3. Mexico (1821-36), 4. Republic of Texas (1836-45), 5. United States (1845-1861; 1865-present) and 6. Confederate States (1861-65).

The anniversary dual dates of "1836-1936" are included on the coin's reverse, in fairly small lettering, under the depiction of the Alamo. The two dates, in combination with the issue date on the obverse, make the Texas Centennial half dollar a triple-date coin,

1934-38 Texas Independence Centennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Texas half dollar, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/19/2022  07:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Now that I've finished up the US classic commemorative coins with dual (or more) dates, I wanted to sneak in a few commemorative silver dollars from the modern series that have (IMO) historically important backstories.

First up, the 1996 Smithsonian Institution Silver Dollar...

The Smithsonian Institution was originally funded by a bequest from the estate of James Smithson of England. Smithson died in 1829, at the age of 64, and, per his wishes, proceeds from his estate eventually were used toward "an Establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men" in the United States. The Act establishing what would become the Smithsonian Institution was signed into law on August 10, 1846. (To read more details of the story, see the links below.)

The obverse of the coin features a well-executed depiction of the Smithsonian Castle, the first building of the Smithsonian Institution. The dual dates of the sesquicentennial anniversary - "1846-1996" - are found below the Castle on the obverse.

The coin's reverse is an allegorical depiction of a classical female figure holding the Torch of Knowledge in her raised left hand and a scroll featuring "ART / HISTORY / SCIENCE" written on it in her right. The figure is depicted floating above the earth with the North Atlantic Ocean at the center and the North American, European and African continents visible.

1996 Smithsonian Institution 150th Anniversary Silver Dollar



For more on the Smithsonian Institution Silver Dollar, see:

- 1996 Smithsonian Institution Silver Dollar.


For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more Modern US commemorative stories, see: Commems Collection.



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 Posted 08/19/2022  08:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Now that I've finished up the US classic commemorative coins with dual (or more) dates, I wanted to sneak in a few commemorative silver dollars from the modern series that have (IMO) historically important backstories.
Excellent!


Quote:
First up, the 1996 Smithsonian Institution Silver Dollar...
A fantastic start.
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 Posted 08/19/2022  09:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Continuing with modern gold, 1997 Jackie Robinson




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 Posted 08/19/2022  12:40 pm  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1997 Philippines 1 Peso:

These coins have the date of issue on the reverse. The date 1993 on the obverse refers to the date of the establishment of the Philippines Central Bank.
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 Posted 08/19/2022  1:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@NumisRob: Interesting coin - thanks for posting! A very pragmatic use of dual dating.


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 Posted 08/20/2022  10:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One of the more important anniversaries to be celebrated on a US commemorative coin, IMO, was the bicentennial of the US Congress - commemorated in 1989 with a gold Half Eagle and a Silver Dollar. The Half Eagle has already been posted, so I will focus on just the Silver Dollar from my collection.

The US Congress was established by the US Constitution:

Article I
Section 1: Congress
All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

The Constitution, in the remainder of Article I, specifies the composition of each chamber, and outlines each chamber's responsibilities and its legislative powers. (It's a good read if you have a few minutes: US Constitution.)

Congress first met on March 4, 1789 in Federal Hall in New York City. It held it first meeting in Washington, DC on November 17, 1800 - it was the Second Session of the 6th Congress.

The obverse of the silver dollar depicts the Statue of Freedom which is erected at at the top of the US Capitol Dome. The dual dates of the bicentennial - "1789" and "1989" - flank Freedom. The coin's reverse presents the Mace of the House of Representatives. The National Bird of the US, the American Bald Eagle, surmounts the mace and is perched atop a world globe with the Western Hemisphere facing forward (the US is in the Western Hemisphere). Note: The Hemisphere detail is not seen on the coin's design.

1989 US Congress Bicentennial - Silver Dollar



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Congress Bicentennial silver dollar (and gold Half Eagle), see: Commems Collection.



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 Posted 08/21/2022  04:09 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cyprus 100 mils 1976:

The coins of this series are all dual-dated. The date '1976' is the year of issue. The date '1960' on the shield is the year the Republic of Cyprus was established following independence from the United Kingdom.
Edited by NumisRob
08/21/2022 04:09 am
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 Posted 08/21/2022  11:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another modern gold commemorative with some toning on the reverse.



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 Posted 08/21/2022  3:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One of my disappointments in the US classic series of commemorative coins was the Congress' failure to pass the 1937 bill that proposed a half dollar commemorating the 150th anniversary of the US Constitution. It took 50 years, but at least the Constitution got its "day in metal" in 1987 when Congress authorized silver and gold commemorative coins for its 200th anniversary.

The US Constitution is the framework of the US Government; it has proven to be a stable, yet flexible enough document to remain as the guiding force of the nation's Government for nearly 235 years (and counting!). It created the three branches of the US Government - Executive, Legislative and Judicial, it defines the division of powers between the Federal Government and the individual States and outlines rights and freedoms to be guaranteed to Americans.

A silver one dollar coin and a gold Half Eagle were authorized to help mark the Constitution's bicentennial; each included two dates, but took different approaches to their placement. The Silver Dollar presented them as "1787-1987" on one side, the gold Half Eagle split the dates between its sides.

1987 US Constitution Bicentennial Silver Dollar


The obverse design of the Silver Dollar features a quill pen presented over pages of parchment paper (alluding to the US Constitution) with "We the People" (the famous opening phrase of the US Constitution) written below it. The dual dates of the anniversary "1787 - 1987" are seen below the pages, under an arc of 13 stars; they flank the motto "LIBERTY."

The coin's reverse design presents a large group of people of varied time periods and backgrounds that is meant to represent the wide diversity to be found among the peoples of the US.


1987 US Constitution Bicentennial Gold Half Eagle


The obverse design of the gold coin presents a stylized, left-facing bald eagle that is clutching a quill pen in its right talon; the quill extends in a northeast direction across the face of the coin. In the background are seen 13 rays of sun light - the "13" being representative of the original 13 states that ratified the US Constitution. The year of issue for the coin - "1987" - is seen at the rim at the six o'clock position.

The Half Eagle's reverse design also features a quill. The feather is presented at the design's center with "We the People" inscribed over/in front of it. The "SEPT 17 1787" date to the left of the quill (viewer's perspective) refers to the date the delegates at the Constitutional Convention signed the document. Thirteen stars are symbolically included in the design (same symbolism as on obverse).



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/21/2022  7:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add eaglebub7 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Pictured is a 1959 Hawaii Statehood Year Souvenir $1 Trade Token Brass So-Called Dollar. The year 1959 is on the obverse, with 1960 on the reverse, which is when you had to cash it in. There are several spelling errors (not this example) related to this token, like OAHU being spelled OHAU.

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