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2017 Australian 5 Cent Die Failed

 
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Pillar of the Community
Australia
561 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2022  06:29 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Allcoinage to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I was told that liquid doesn't leak out of coins this 2017 has been leaking from indent on head of queen.




This above is 2017 normal 5 centred below is the die failure 2017 5 cent coin.





Pillar of the Community
Australia
561 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2022  06:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Allcoinage to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I looked to make sure that it wasn't PMD but die was oozing from indent that I circled.
Pillar of the Community
Australia
561 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2022  06:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Allcoinage to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
And the fluid or die had dried out overnight and this is I'm guessing die had failed.
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United States
71559 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2022  09:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Are you talking about die grease?
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Australia
14643 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2022  09:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Dies don't "ooze" anywhere. They're made of hardened steel, with a melting point far higher than anything the presses can achieve through general use. When dies fail, they crack, rather than melt or deform like that.

What you're seeing here is a " Grease Filled Die".

As I noted in one of your earlier threads, high-pressure modern coining machinery uses high temperature grease, rather than regular lubrication oil. This grease is solid at room temperature, kind of like wax. "Used" grease, after tens of thousands of pumps of the dies back and forwards, is usually filled with microscopic bits of worn-off metal, and is even more solid and metal-like at room temperature.

When the run of a coining press stops, the warm dies get a chance to cool down, and any grease still stuck to the die cools and solidifies. It stays there, in the cracks and crevices of the die, the next time the presses start up again. The result is a coin featuring a " Grease Filled Die".

" Grease Filled Die" and "worn die" can look similar, in terms of "the detail is missing". But as a general rule, grease-fill shows up on the low points of the die - which are the high points of the coin. Die wear shows up on the high points of the die, which are the low points on the resultant coins. And there, in the middle of the queen's hair and forehead, is a "high point" on the coin, and thus a "low point" on the die.

"Grease-filled die" can also look a lot like plain old wear from circulation, since the same high points that are vulnerable to grease-fill are vulnerable to circulation rub; you can tell the difference on a high grade coin because the rest of the coin is lustrous and uncirculated and doesn't appear to match up with the "worn spot". But on a worn heavily circulated coin, greasers are notoriously hard to ID. Fortunately, that's not a problem here.

I don't think "greasers" see too much of a premium from error collectors; they're not considered a "major error", nor even a variety, unless the "bald spot" or "mising detail" is particularly noteworthy.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
Australia
561 Posts
 Posted 08/20/2022  10:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Allcoinage to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks sap, and yes its not oil I used a similar wax for cutting sheet metal and thicker sheets too size.
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