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Need Help Iding The Mint Of This Claudius II Bronze

 
 
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Pillar of the Community
United States
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 Posted 07/16/2009  6:55 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Archraz to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I just got this one recently, but, as the thread title says, I need some help identifying the mint of origin. Also, might anyone know of the significance of the reverse design? Thanks!

Update: This looks to be the Roman mint. (RIC 36( Am I right about this? http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/...us_II/i.html







Edited by Archraz
07/16/2009 10:02 pm
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Australia
13140 Posts
 Posted 07/16/2009  7:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's this type, GENIVS EXERCI, "Spirit of the Army".

The Genius, or Spirit, of a group (such as the Army, or the People of Rome as a whole) was a personification of the unity of purpose of a group that gave them a power to do things far greater than the sum of it's parts could have. In that sense it's analogous to the "team spirit" often spoken of today, only with more supernatural overtones. A "Genius" could also watch over an individual in high office (such as the Emperor), empowering them to do a job no mere mortal could do.

Roman coins of this period don't have mintmarks. They were generally produced only at a few locations at any one time. The latest edition of the Sear catalogue tells you which mint it was most likely produced at, but this is only determined from stylistic analysis and hoard evidence. I'm at work at the moment, but if no-one else has chimed in before tonight, I'll look it up when I get home.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
United States
3414 Posts
 Posted 07/16/2009  7:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Archraz to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sap- Thanks very much for the help! I must admit that I am surprised that this coin is in fact from a Roman mint. Out of curiosity, how much do you suppose that this coin is worth? I paid about $15, so I don't think that I could have done too badly.
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 Posted 07/16/2009  9:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
$15 for an identifiable CLaudius II sounds reasonable enough.

Speaking of the identity: I occurs to me that "GENIVS" doesn't fit too well in the available space, and the letter I thought was a V looks less and less like one the more I look at it; it may be another type. FIDES EXERCI (Faith of the Army) is perhaps a more likely possibility; again, I'll have to check my Sear to see if there are any other types I might have missed.

Fides was the personification of Faith, but not in a religious sense; this was faith that someone would do as they had been asked to do, without needing constant checking and supervision to make sure they were doing it properly. Perhaps "trust" would be a better translation of the sentiment implied. In this case, the emperor was saying he had faith that the army would do it's job properly and not revolt against him, and in return he would be worthy of the army's faith to not make boneheaded military decisions that would get them all killed.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
United States
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 Posted 07/16/2009  9:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Archraz to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sap- thanks for all of the fascinating information and help! I always learn something new from you.
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 Posted 07/17/2009  05:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The FIDES EXERCI type was indeed struck in Rome, in AD 268-9. Listed in Sear as number 11334.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
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 Posted 07/17/2009  12:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Archraz to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sap- Thanks again! You are quite the master.

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