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 Posted 08/06/2017  11:28 pm  Show Profile   Check Moe145's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Moe145 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I LOVE this stuff!!
Links to ALL previous "Days of..." Threads:
http://goccf.com/t/108352#108352
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 Posted 08/07/2017  2:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Victor D. Brenner's (designer of the Lincoln penny) design for the $1 coin.
Interesting what could have been, even though it looks similar to the seated and trade dollars.
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 Posted 08/07/2017  5:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The design looks kind of old fashioned entering the turn into the 20th century. Very different than the very simple Lincoln cent design he is famous for.
numismatic_student aka CoinNerd
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 Posted 08/07/2017  7:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here is a medal that Victor D. Brenner designed for the Art Institute of Chicago's Norman Wait Harris Prize. It is a massive 70mm. Seems to be channeling Hermon MacNeil's standing liberty design.

Still feels classical rather than MacNeal's art deco feel. I think VDB was just more rooted in victorian classicism.


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Edited by numismatic student
08/07/2017 7:31 pm
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 Posted 08/08/2017  11:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Vermillion Flycatche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That is an interesting piece and the 26 date would means it was most likely designed after the SLQ were put in circulation. The reverse has the Art Institute profile and I think that is an oak branch on the left. What is the right? Any idea of the significance of those two tree branches?
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 Posted 08/08/2017  11:43 pm  Show Profile   Check TNG's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add TNG to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
My guess would be laurel a symbol of Victory
maybe Olive branch ( peace )?
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Edited by TNG
08/08/2017 11:44 pm
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 Posted 08/10/2017  11:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Silver certificates between March 1964 and June 24, 1968, were exchangeable at U.S. Assay Office facilities for silver bullion granules. The plastic box containing the granules does not resemble packaging used by the U.S. Mint. -Coin World 2011

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Edited by numismatic student
08/10/2017 11:30 pm
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 Posted 08/11/2017  11:31 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Silver certificates between March 1964 and June 24, 1968, were exchangeable at U.S. Assay Office facilities for silver bullion granules.
Something new I learned today.
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 Posted 08/12/2017  07:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Gary to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This medal was designed in 1909 a few years before MacNiels SLQ and in the book "The Beaux-Arts of America" by Barbara A. Baxter, she states the following.




Here is another picture of the medal in bronze.



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 Posted 08/12/2017  09:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the helpful information Gary!
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 Posted 08/13/2017  12:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Here is another picture of the medal in bronze.
Very nice!
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 Posted 08/18/2017  12:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


NGC Certifies 17 Experimental Glass Cents and Tokens
Coin World July 25, 2017

Patterns struck during World War II by the Blue Ridge Glass Corporation

Numismatic Guaranty Corporation® (NGC®) has certified 17 experimental cents and tokens struck in glass during World War II to test the unusual composition for coinage. Images of these rare pieces can be viewed at NGCcoin.com/GlassCents.

1942 experimental glass cent. Image courtesy NGCWith copper needed for the war effort, the United States Mint experimented in 1942 with a variety of alternative materials for cents. Pattern (or test) cents were struck in bronze, brass, zinc, zinc-coated steel, manganese, white metal, aluminum, lead, rubber, fiber, plastic and even glass. Ultimately, zinc-coated steel was selected for 1943 cents.

The glass patterns were struck by Blue Ridge Glass Corporation of Kingsport, Tennessee, using blanks supplied by Corning Glass Works and dies prepared by US Mint engraver John Sinnock. The 1942-dated obverse was based on the then-circulating Columbia Two Centavos while the reverse featured a design proposed by Anthony Paquet in the 19th century.

The group certified by NGC includes nine of these pattern glass cents, of which seven are intact and two are fragments. All are struck on amber-colored glass blanks. The grades of the intact specimens range from NGC MS 62 to NGC MS 64 while the fragmented pieces were attributed but not graded. Numismatists were previously aware of just two Blue Ridge glass pattern cents, one of which was a fragment.

1942 glass token. Image courtesy NGCAlso certified by NGC are eight glass tokens struck at the same time as the glass cents by the Blue Ridge Glass Corporation. Three of these tokens were struck with a die depicting the factory with the text of BLUE RIDGE GLASS CORP. above. The others feature more modest design elements. The tokens have been graded MS 64 to MS 66 by NGC except for two that are fragmented.

The fragmented pieces reveal the reason glass coins were not practical for circulation—they would break too easily. Roger W. Burdette, author of the book United States Pattern and Experimental Pieces of World War II, noted that Blue Ridge Glass had some employees carry glass blanks in their pockets, but those blanks chipped, creating sharp edges.

These experimental glass pieces have been cataloged by Burdette and will appear in the next edition of his book. NGC used Burdette’s catalog numbers on its certification labels.

The 17 experimental glass cents and tokens recently certified by NGC will be sold by Heritage Auctions on August 4, 2017, at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Denver. To view the sale, visit HA.com/1258

NGC has posted an image gallery of these rare and unusual experimental pieces. View them at NGCcoin.com/GlassCents.
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 Posted 08/18/2017  2:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Those are very interesting!
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 Posted 08/18/2017  5:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add numismatic student to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Took the kiddos to see a couple of depictions of Liberty in NYC. First, Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi's Statue of Liberty and then Augustus Saint Gaudens' Statue of William Tecumseh Sherman led by Liberty on the southeast corner of Central Park.


numismatic_student aka CoinNerd
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Edited by numismatic student
08/18/2017 5:06 pm
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