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How do you remove ugly toning?

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sel_69l
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Australia
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 Posted 07/28/2010  08:16 am Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Message

I have seen some threads that have discussed toning, and some high grade coins shown must have lost value because the toning on them is so ugly. I understand that nice toning can enhance the value of a coin, and it would be grievous to remove it. I know. I collect ancients.

Nevertheless, some of the high grade U.S. coins have been shown, where the owner has been rightly disappointed by the appearance of an otherwise beautiful coin especially in MS63 or better.

My question is this:

Is it possible to remove obviously ugly toning from an MS63 coin or better, without detracting from it's value?

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 Posted 07/28/2010  09:07 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add nod2003 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In most cases, it is a bad idea since toning is a part of the metal surface.
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 Posted 07/28/2010  09:16 am  Show Profile Check SsuperDdave's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add SsuperDdave to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Is it possible to remove obviously ugly toning from an MS63 coin or better, without detracting from it's value?


Yes, it's possible. I phrase the answer that way because several factors are involved. It's the process called "dipping," almost always involving a solution of Thiourea.

The amount of toning is relevant; once it reaches a certain level of development, the dip time required to remove it will leave the surfaces of the coin visibly altered. Under no circumstances can you ever dip any coin into this stuff for more than a few seconds, during its' entire lifetime, before sufficient metal is removed from the surface to forever dull the luster.

So, you're first faced with the question: has this coin been dipped before? I am being deliberately vague about the topic; it's a practice I cannot endorse, and I do not want anyone attempting it on my recommendation.
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 Posted 07/28/2010  09:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Also if the toning is heavy the toning itself will have remove or displaced enough to the metal to destroy the luster. Removing that type of toning will result in a dull dead appearing coin.
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 Posted 07/28/2010  11:02 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Namachieli to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's for this reason I stray away from deep color tones, ie: blues greens and purple/red. To me these are the worst to ones because it shows toning in a later stage that now may be attractive, but can easily become unattractive over time. It's tonings that are very light and even that I like, ie: thin yellow, light pink, light gold.

To me however, when given the choice. No toning > toning.

A one Mississippi dip might do the trick. But heed the above advice.
Edited by Namachieli
07/28/2010 11:05 am
Valued Member
United States
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 Posted 07/28/2010  1:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add weavus135 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I've never tried 'dipping' and I think I want to experiment jsut to see for myself what this does to coins. I don't collect the expensive silver (and not much US at all) but I would like to just see what this does to coins. so, do any of you have a suggestion on a brand of this stuff?

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 Posted 07/28/2010  1:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Namachieli to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
theres plenty of articles and pictures that show you what really happens. no reason to waste your coins in the learning process.
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 Posted 07/28/2010  3:00 pm  Show Profile Check robbudo's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add robbudo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If someone is experimenting with cleaning coins (whether it's to remove toning or whether it's to educate themselves on what cleaned coins look like), what should they do with the coins next?

Should they put a big scratch on the coin so it doesn't end up in someone's collection down the road?
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 Posted 07/28/2010  4:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wheatguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Acetone should work in removing artificial toning. E-Zest is a commonly used silver dip. Some consider dipping a coin doctoring, even if there are no indicative signs of cleaning. It's a controversial issue, since many collectors and dealers "say no to dipping", yet many dealers and collectors dip coins. A dip in acetone won't harm the coin and isn't really considered dipping a coin.


Quote:

It's for this reason I stray away from deep color tones, ie: blues greens and purple/red. To me these are the worst to ones because it shows toning in a later stage that now may be attractive, but can easily become unattractive over time. It's tonings that are very light and even that I like, ie: thin yellow, light pink, light gold.

To me however, when given the choice. No toning > toning.

A one Mississippi dip might do the trick. But heed the above advice.


No reason to stay away from those colors as long as they are stored properly. A non-humid and safe environment or an Intercept Shield box will stop additional toning from occurring.
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 Posted 07/28/2010  4:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Namachieli to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
No reason to stay away from those colors as long as they are stored properly


I should also say that it's a great reason to stay away if you dont like the way they look.

Even slabbed coins can tone further. I'm just saying, for the average collector, the toning will change.

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 Posted 07/28/2010  4:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wheatguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree but toned coins, in slabs or not, will not tone if stored in, for example an Intercept Shield box which is only $20 or so.


Quote:

you dont like the way they look.


Definitely. Collect what you like.
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 Posted 07/28/2010  5:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add pls to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Definitely collect what you like, and trade off what you don't. Don't ruin what you don't like. Like using a Brillo pad on a dull silver dollar, heavy cleaning is a bad idea for coins.
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 Posted 07/30/2010  5:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
If someone is experimenting with cleaning coins (whether it's to remove toning or whether it's to educate themselves on what cleaned coins look like), what should they do with the coins next?

Should they put a big scratch on the coin so it doesn't end up in someone's collection down the road?


NO, just spend them. That is basically what I do. I've attempted to remove toning from coins for many years with all sorts of results. Some good, some bad. It's reall the type of toning, tarnishing, corroding, staining that you need to know.
For example I've got an Indian Head Nickel that was almost completely black. For almost a year now I've experimented with Acetone, Laquer Thinners, Mineral spirits, Vinegar, Lemon Juice, Tomato Juice and almost any thing imaginable and yet that dark discoloration remains. On other types of coins such as toned, very recent cents, after such attempts I simply put them back into circulation.
I presently have a pile of such coins on a kitchen window sill allowing them to sort of rediscolor making them almost look normal. Takes a long time but usually works.
just carl
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