Coin Community Family of Web Sites Live Coin auctions starting as low as $1
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


This page may contain links that result in small commissions to keep this free site up and running.
Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Tom Goodheart's Last 20 Posts

Format Coins Of Birmingham: Still In Business?
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/29/2023  6:32 pm
Glad to be able to help.
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
England, Charles I Related Items Wanted. British Historical Medals, Literature, Coins
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/28/2023  11:50 am
This group of British Historical Medals sold back in May through Stacks Bowers in their World Collectors' sale ( Lot #72413 ). BHM 1437 WM



I'd like one of these with King Charles I on it, (#25, bottom right, damaged slab).

So if anyone here bought the lot and is willing to part with it, please let me know! Thank you!
Forum: Post Your Numismatic Want Lists Here
 
Format Coins Of Birmingham: Still In Business?
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/28/2023  11:24 am
List 50, March 1995 daltonista.







Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins

Format Coins Of Birmingham: Still In Business?
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/28/2023  11:09 am
Ah, yes. Found it @daltonista. How annoying of Noble to omit which list!
Sadly my friend who has most of the Format fpls needs to know which year's issue to narrow it down!

He might try anyway ..
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
A Continuing Thread ~ Post Your Tokens, Medals, Exonumia Acquisitions
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/27/2023  07:49 am
Another Royalist badge from me.

Unfortunately, not a great deal appears to be known about this series of what are commonly termed 'badges'. They were produced in, as far as I know, unknown numbers. Generally by casting (which meant that an existing example could be copied without need for much engraving or die making) and then the finished product was chased to tidy it up, a simpler process than having to strike them. No doubt made in Royalist strongholds such as Oxford and Nottingham once King Charles and his followers had ceded London to the Parliamentarians.

Worn or carried by supporters of the crown to show their loyalty (we know such badges came out of hiding and were shown openly following the restoration of the monarchy and for some years afterwards), so probably of more sentimental than monetary value to their owners.

They were also made in numerous different styles, although for simplicity often the obverse showing the bust of the king remains the same, with only the reverse design changing.

Which brings me to this. Medallic Illustrations 362/236. The 'usual' bust of Charles, 'lovelock on left shoulder, in falling lace collar, armour, and scarf across the breast'. But with a different reverse where the Royal Arms is in relief rather than the commoner 'engraved' style and the crowned shield is not within the Garter.



Gilded silver, 27mm x 20mm. 2.93g. Some light wear to the gilding on the high points. The reverse shield appears poorly rendered (a feature it shares with the British Museum's example) rather than worn.

So far I've only found the one other example (British Museum #7282). None in the online collection records of the Fitzwilliam or Hunterian collections and none in the Farquhar (1955), Heckett (1977), 'English Collector' (1989), Foley (2014) or Platt (2022) sales, so has to be assumed to be quite rare.

It'd be nice to know a bit more (either about the provenance of this particular piece or other examples) but that seems to be the nature of this collection area, all a bit unknown! Such is life.
Forum: Tokens, Medals, Challenge Coins, and other Exonumia
 
Format Coins Of Birmingham: Still In Business?
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/27/2023  06:21 am
Been trading since 1971 and Garry Charman who founded it was born in 1946, so may have retired.
The address in Birmingham is a set of serviced offices. And they aren't listed as a member of the British Numismatic trade Association so I wonder if it's another 'old school' dealer that is no longer trading?

They used to publish twice-yearly fixed price lists. #3688 will be a number in one of those.
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
A Continuing Thread ~ Post Your Tokens, Medals, Exonumia Acquisitions
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/23/2023  4:00 pm

Quote:
I've read about that "Kings and Queens" set. As I recall, there's a smaller piece, in a different medal, for Cromwell.


There is indeed. The set starts with William the Conqueror and finishes with a medal each for George II (to whom the set was dedicated) and his Queen, Caroline. All medals are 41mm, apart from Cromwell's at 38mm.

And thanks for the kind comments. I hoped people might find something a bit different to be of interest.
Forum: Tokens, Medals, Challenge Coins, and other Exonumia
 
A Continuing Thread ~ Post Your Tokens, Medals, Exonumia Acquisitions
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/23/2023  05:52 am
The cameo is a bit of a curiosity. Made in the style of Dassier's portrait and of a similar size, but in jasper ware (coloured porcelain). A technique invented by Josiah Wedgwood, it's likely these are Wedgwood productions, originally sold in sets (like the Dassier ones). Late 18th-early 19th century. The reverse just bears an imprint of the design number (#25) for this particular monarch.



While the majority of my collection is contemporaneous with Charles' reign (1625-1649) things like this amuse me and so I've allowed them a space. This was meant to be a little sideline from my coin collection, but has rather taken on a life of it's own!
Forum: Tokens, Medals, Challenge Coins, and other Exonumia
 
A Continuing Thread ~ Post Your Tokens, Medals, Exonumia Acquisitions
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/23/2023  05:40 am
Hi publius. The medallet is indeed of a similar style to religious medals with fixing loops at the compass points, which I imagine was not entirely accidental!

The two medals you mention are a bit later. The smaller silver one was engraved and struck by James and Norbert Roettier at the Mint in the Tower of London and offered to the public for a bit over a guinea (so not cheap) in The London Gazette of 1695.



The larger one was designed and struck by Jean Dassier as part of his Kings & Queens series of 1731. Sold to the public for 6 guineas (also issued in silver and damascened bronze). Incidentally I bought this from a medal dealer in the US! There are several later re-issues of these. Once of which (restruck in white metal by Edward Thomason in 1830) is on my 'wants' list.


Forum: Tokens, Medals, Challenge Coins, and other Exonumia
 
A Continuing Thread ~ Post Your Tokens, Medals, Exonumia Acquisitions
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/22/2023  6:17 pm
And in case anyone complains, here are some medals from the same period (17th-18th century) with King Charles I as the subject. Apologies for the poor photo.



Forum: Tokens, Medals, Challenge Coins, and other Exonumia
 
A Continuing Thread ~ Post Your Tokens, Medals, Exonumia Acquisitions
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/22/2023  6:07 pm
Just found this thread. So here's my latest addition, which I hope someone finds of interest! I collect historical medals from this period too, but this is a medallet (more commonly termed 'badges' in the UK) of King Charles I of England. These were produced towards the end and after his reign to allow Royalists to show their support for the King at the time of the English Civil War.

These would have been worn on a cord around the neck, or by using the loops at top and bottom, sewn to clothing. As the war turned against the King and professing loyalty to the crown carried more risk, the badges became smaller, so that they could be concealed more easily. This one is quite small at 26mm x 20mm (1 in x in).

The war ended with the King's execution and 10 years of England and Wales, later along with Ireland and Scotland, being governed as a republic, before the monarchy was restored in 1660 and this is a memorial to Charles' death. Possibly by Thomas Rawlins and dating from around 1649, not at first sight particularly striking, but of great historical appeal to me.

Classed as Medallic Illustrations 344/196 (Platt Type A). The obverse is a relatively standard portrait of Charles, facing left and with his titles in the legend around. But what is interesting to me is the reverse.

Here we see a skull, a crown below and another, different in style above. At first this might be taken for a standard 'memento mori' since on either side is written GLORIA and VANITAS.

What tells us the story is however the legend that surrounds the image, which reads BEATAM . ET. ETERNAM . SPLENDIDAM . AT. GRAVEM which is almost a quote of Charles' last words on the scaffold, to the effect that he was about to relinquish a splendid, but burdensome crown (VANITAS) and instead receive a blessed and eternal one (GLORIA).

A message which reflects the symbols and message of the Eikon Basilike, a book purported to be a spiritual autobiography written by the King himself which was published on 9 February 1649, a mere 10 days after his execution.

I've only ever seen two others like this (one in the British Museum) so I'm very happy to have tracked this one down at last!




Forum: Tokens, Medals, Challenge Coins, and other Exonumia
 
Relig - Protlec - Anc - Liber - Parl, Hiber - Rex - Carolvs: Need Help With This Coin
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 08/14/2023  10:55 am
The reverse legend you highlighted in the title to this thread Michal is taken from a speech by Charles I, where he declared he'd protect the Protestant religion (Relig . Prot) the laws of England (Leg . Ang) and the freedom of Parliament (Liber . Parl).

Hence such pieces are known as 'declaration' type. Sadly, despite his assurances, Parliament was not convinced and we all know how the story ends ..

As Sap says, a replica. But still quite an interesting piece.
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
Good Books To Get Featuring United Kingdom Coinage (Pre-Decimal)
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 07/13/2023  05:49 am

It may not affect you much Westcoin, but Spink reviewed the whole of the Charles I silver coinage section in 2006, changing the numbering for many coins. Anything after that should be fine. That and Coincraft (I like that this gives diameters in the milled section, which can make identification much easier!) are sufficient for an overview.

As with anything else, there are many more specialist publications as you go into detail. The main ones are perhaps English Silver Coinage (shortened to ESC) which is in it's 7th edition for silver from 1649 and Wilson Peck's English Copper, Tin and Bronze Coins in the British Museum 1558-1958 (though that's hard to come by and pricey!) People use both for classification I believe.

I'd say if you start to focus on a particular area, come back here and people can recommend a more detailed book if you want one. Worth remembering the British Numismatic Society has digitised it's journal, which has many helpful in depth articles.

The above is for milled (machine made) coinage (basically from the reign of Charles II). There are other books for earlier hammered coinage if you find that interesting. England's Striking History: A Brief History of England and Its Silver Hammered Coinage is a good starting point, I'd say.

Oh, and .. welcome to the dark side!
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins

1928 1 Farthing Proof Vs Uncirculated
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 05/08/2023  08:08 am
The rims of proof coins are normally very sharply defined. When handling them the edge feels almost as if you could cut yourself on them. This looks like a nice circulation strike to me.
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
Can I Get Help On What This Is
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 05/05/2023  11:55 am
As captainmandrake says. Maundy money. Yours is a penny Genlou.

The sets are made up from four possible coins. A penny, twopence, threepence and a fourpence. Originally made up from currency, nowadays specifically struck for Maundy sets. The recipients receive the equivalent to the sovereign's age in pennies. So it helps if the king or queen is older!
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
Odd Shaped Script On The Edge Of A 1996 Celtic Cross One Pound Coin
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 04/18/2023  4:51 pm
Forgery. The legends seem to be the part they found hardest to copy. Sometimes the legends don't even match the designs they were meant to go with. But then they only needed to look passable to the average punter. Most people don't inspect their change to the degree we do!

On the bright side though, these modern counterfeits are historically quite interesting, although not of any great value. In the UK a specialist collector of fakes would likely be happy to give you a pound for it!
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
Very Worn 1998 50 Pence - What Caused It? Opinions Invited!
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 04/18/2023  06:05 am
The lettering looks wrong. I'd guess a cast fake. Obviously not too far off weight so wasn't picked up in sorting.
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
2011 20 P I Found In My Change Is It Rare?
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 03/25/2023  07:32 am
I think someone's hammered a punch into it. What's known as 'Post-Mint Damage'

Most likely it's unique. And worth precisely 20p. Sorry.
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
Charles 1 Silver Coin ID Help Please
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 03/25/2023  07:30 am
Well, that turned out great! Very well done Wade! Shame there's no paperwork for it. It would be interesting to know how it turned up where it did.

As an aside, I'd grade this at about a British Very Fine. I'm not in the market for one, though I do collect this sort of thing. At auction I'd expect an estimate of 800- 1000 ($975-$1200), so keep it safe!
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 
Best Place To Grade Coins In The Uk?
Tom Goodheart
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
848 Posts
Old Post Posted 03/13/2023  09:13 am
Well, Third Party Grading and slabs were introduced to allow dealers to trade in the days before images were easily available on the internet, so that makes sense jecz.

And I don't think British collectors mistrust or shun the coins in slabs. It's just that most TPGS grade to the Sheldon scale, which wasn't designed for British coinage and is sometimes carried out by people who don't have the knowledge or experience of the coins they're slabbing to say anything useful! In particular early milled or hammered coinage often have qualities that don't translate well to a strict numeric scale. And slabs can make it difficult to see the edges (or even outlines!) of coins, which can be important to UK collectors.

There is an increasing market for encapsulated coins in the UK. However it's more for the more modern pieces. And sometimes applied to items that I don't feel benefit from it. What's the point of a 'top pop' grade for a series that's all struck to proof standard and not intended for circulation?

I think the British view is still 'buy the coin, not the slab'. I'm sure we've all seen things that, technically, are uncirculated, but spoilt by odd toning or some other defect that takes away the 'eye appeal' but not the grade. Similarly, coins that, due to striking techniques of the time, lack the crispness of a modern issue and are subsequently 'penalised' with a lower grade, even though they are better than average examples for the type.

I worry that the trend to slab everything is like shoehorning round pegs into square holes. TP Grading has it's place. I just hope that British collectors and dealers continue to understand that it's not appropriate for everything. In some cases it's just a waste of money.
Forum: United Kingdom (Great Britain) Coins
 


Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2023 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.55 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: