Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Commems Collection: 1936 Rhode Island Tercentenary Revisited

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 5 / Views: 1,223Next Topic  
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
5937 Posts
 Posted 08/19/2013  10:30 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
In 1937, the Rhode Island Tercentenary Commission issued its report regarding the "Celebration of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in 1636 by Roger Williams."

The report, a hardcover volume of some 158 pages, provides a nicely complete summary of the activities of the Commission and its various committees. It includes a review of the numerous tercentenary celebration events that were held, the educational programs and exhibits staged, the dozens of books and historical maps that were published, as well as the road markers and memorials that were erected.

Read More: Commems Collection

As one would expect, the volume also includes a discussion of the commemorative half-dollar. The report recounts the quick, near sell-out of the coins on their first day of release, and mentions the higher prices that were charged for the coins by coin dealers within days of the coins being released. The report proudly states, however, that the Jubilee Committee, the group responsible for the coin, held firm with its announced price for the half-dollar and sold its supply for either $1.00 (local sales) or $1.15 (mail orders). According to the report, the first Rhode Island commemorative half-dollar was purchased by Ethelbert A. Rusden of Providence

For a discussion of the "Opening Day Sell-out" of the Rhode Island half-dollar, see the discussion here: http://goccf.com/t/146787.

A somewhat unusual inclusion in the report is the extended discussion of the coin that was written by John Howard Benson, one of the coin's designers. In addition to his explanation of the obverse and reverse designs for the coin, Benson included a few comments that I find particularly interesting.

The first is a discussion concerning the inclusion of required inscriptions on US commemorative coins. Benson remarked, "On most such coins the words required by mint regulations are often put on as small as possible. Here we have made them a definite part of the whole pattern so that ornamentation and lettering fit together in an integral design."

I would argue that the inscriptions "United States of America," "Half Dollar" and "E Pluribus Unum" as presented on the Rhode Island half-dollar are proportionally similar in size to many of the US commemorative coins that preceded it, but I agree that the inscription "In God We Trust" is definitely presented in larger letters than what had been seen previously (when the inscription was included). I also agree with Benson's assertion that the inscriptions are better incorporated into the design. The use of the inscriptions to form a wide border that completely encircles the central devices of the obverse and reverse definitely makes for a well-integrated design.

Another interesting comment is Benson's reference to the future development of toning/coloring on the coins - though I'm not sure if he was referring to coins kept out of circulation by collectors or to those that might be placed into circulation. Benson commented, "All silver coins turn black eventually and the best ones give a beautiful black and white pattern, the background remaining black and the raised portions white. When this happens to the Rhode Island coin, it will have an unusual effect." In my view, the circulated examples of the Rhode Island posted here on CCF are more in line with this comment than are toned, mint state examples.

Following is an interesting discussion of the Rhode Island name included in the report, along with a pair of images of the coin.


Commission Report: Rhode Island Name




1936 Rhode Island Commemorative Half-Dollar: Obverse




1936 Rhode Island Commemorative Half-Dollar: Reverse



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Pillar of the Community
United States
4052 Posts
 Posted 08/20/2013  06:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bpoc1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Commems, thanks again with another informative article.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
101057 Posts
 Posted 08/20/2013  5:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The high quality of your write-ups still impresses me.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
5937 Posts
 Posted 08/21/2013  7:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@bpoc1/jbuck: Thanks both for the kind words and positive feedback - much appreciated!


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
7121 Posts
 Posted 08/21/2013  8:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Home now from way too much work ... but of course any commems post on any topic is required reading for all collectors of this series.

This thread again fits the need with commems usual expert insight into the history of the series and his exceptional writing skills to deliver the message.

Personally ... I am waiting for the book to be published.

David
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.finewoodcrafter.com
Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
Pillar of the Community
United States
899 Posts
 Posted 08/22/2013  10:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Doug58s to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
commems... you keep impressing article after article.

I have to say this isn't one of my favorite classics - but learning the history of the coins is part of the desire to collect them and ponder their Heritage. I'd have liked the font to have been smaller and the images more pronounced, but that is just me I guess.
  Previous TopicReplies: 5 / Views: 1,223Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.29 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05