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Commems Collection: 1928 Hawaiian Revisited

 
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 Posted 01/02/2014  11:26 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
The first commemorative coin I presented here on CCF (back in March 2012) was the 1928 Hawaiian, a half-dollar issued to mark the 150th anniversary of the "discovery" of the Hawaiian Islands by Captain James Cook, the noted British explorer. It was a relatively brief post, unlike most of my later discussions of the classic commemorative series. So, I thought I'd revisit the Hawaiian and ramble on a bit about the discussions that took place in Congress regarding the coin.

In late 1927, Victor Stewart Kaleoaloha Houston, House Representative from the Territory of Hawaii introduced a bill proposing a half-dollar coin to mark the sesquicentennial of the discovery of Hawaii. The proposed coin was referred to the House Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures in January 1928.

Read More: Commems Collection

Prior to the Committee meeting to discuss the coin, its Chairman, Randolph Perkins (R-NJ), sent the bill to the Treasury Department to seek their opinion of the coin. Much to the surprise of Representative Perkins and others on the Committee, Andrew Mellon, the Secretary of the Treasury, replied that the "department would interpose no objection to the enactment of this legislation." It's important to note, that by 1928 the Treasury's opposition to special commemorative coins had grown to the point that they were generally opposed to all such coins.

Representative Ole Juulson Kvale (Farmer-Labor-MN) was one of the Committee members who expressed surprise that the Treasury did not object to the bill. He commented, "I am very much interested in learning what powers of persuasion have been exercised by the gentlemen from Hawaii to bring out such a favorable report. The reason I ask is that three years ago this month I endeavored to be spokesman for two and half million of the best citizens of the United States in the interest of a bill of this kind, and I did not even get so far as to introduce the bill because the gentlemen in the Treasury Department told me they would oppose anything of the kind. So I acquiesced in their demand and introduced the bill for a medal instead of a coin. This is not at all as satisfactory as a coin." Representative Kvale was referring to his bill for what became the 1925 Norse-American Centennial medal (vs. a coin).

After further discussion, including statements by Representative Houston that he did not engage in any special lobbying efforts for the coin with the Treasury, Representative Perkins sent a request to Secretary Mellon asking for the reasons behind the lack of opposition. The first reason the Secretary gave in his written response was that "the proposed coin is for a Territorial government enterprise. It is sponsored entirely by the Territorial government of Hawaii." He contrasted this with the private, non-governmental organizations that were typically associated with such special coins.

He also remarked that "a special coin would seem to be a well-merited recognition of their [Hawaii's] interest and loyalty to our government." Secretary Mellon also went on to comment that the number of coins requested by the bill - 10,000 - was a small enough number to ensure that the coins would be kept as souvenirs and not be dumped into circulation; the placing of commemorative coins into circulation was a big issue for the Treasury.

And so, the Hawaii Sesquicentennial commemorative bill was reported out of Committee favorably and would go on to passed by Congress and signed into law by Calvin Coolidge. It would be the last US commemorative coin signed into law until 1934.

Thanks for reading!


1928 Discovery of Hawaii Sesquicentennial - Obverse




1928 Discovery of Hawaii Sesquicentennial - Reverse




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
01/03/2014 2:59 pm
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 Posted 01/03/2014  03:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add PennyPiggy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for expanding my knowledge of this coin.

But the coin just reminds me too much about manifest destiny. Not a big fan of it, regardless of its scarcity.

And even Cook who is still celebrated for his discoveries died over an argument where he tried to strong-arm the natives.

I'm going to look for the next Hawaiian Sesquicentennial half in the modern gold commemorative coins with the high quality designs and limited mintage numbers.
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 Posted 01/03/2014  10:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ASLAN TVorlon to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Manifest Destiny, that was the term I was looking for to describe these...

https://www.coincommunity.com/forum...whichpage=31


I thought Rampant Imperialism and Occupation Government of USA giving way to Occupation Government of Japan, then becoming Occupation Government of USA again, sounded too politically charged but Manifest Destiny says it all Thanks
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 Posted 01/03/2014  11:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add denco7 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another great post, educating us all in the history of this historical and numimatically important set of coins.

I feel like I should print off all of these posts and bind them into a booklet. Can you send a piece of paper with your autograph, so I can say I have a signed copy of the first draft of your new book ?
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 Posted 01/03/2014  12:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kookoox10 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It just plain stinks, in my budget range, this coin is cost prohibitive in any mint state grade. I've had to settle for a cleaned AU earlier in the year just to fulfill this space in my album.
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 Posted 01/03/2014  12:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MeadowviewCollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the information. Your work telling the story behind these coins makes an interesting read.


-MV
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 Posted 01/03/2014  2:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add xshift to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great info, commems.. thanks for posting it
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 Posted 01/03/2014  3:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I continue to be inspired by the unprecedented knowledge you have acquired commems ... your research and subsequent knowledge of this tremendous series is world-class indeed.

Personally I'm very grateful that you continue to share this knowledge with us ... as exemplified again in this post on the 1928 Hawaiian Sesquicentennial half dollar.

Reading the original post (twice now) reminds me that the history and story behind the coins is a significant part of why I so much enjoy the series ... and your well written informative posts always serve well to fill the gaps in my knowledge of that history.

Tremendous insight for me in this line ...


Quote:
Representative Kvale was referring to his bill for what became the 1925 Norse-American Centennial medal (vs. a coin).


I always wondered who was supporting the Norse Medal ... turns out it was "Representative Ole Juulson Kvale (Farmer-Labor-MN)" ... which makes perfect sense.

BTW ... I likely oogled at your PCGS MS65 example on the original thread ... so pardon me if I do so again ... tremendous coin in your set.


Quote:
this coin is cost prohibitive in any mint state grade


Agreed that this is not an inexpensive coin ... but the joy of owning any authentic example in any grade is immeasurable. I say the same for an authentic AU cleaned example such as you profess to have in your set.


Quote:
so I can say I have a signed copy of the first draft of your new book ?


LOL ... I've made that suggestion a few times myself.

Thanks again commems for another all-star sharing of knowledge.

David
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Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
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 Posted 01/03/2014  6:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks all for the positive feedback!

@denco7: Sure! Make sure the page is at least 8.5" x 11" - I sometimes sign big!

@kookoox10: I certainly understand your frustration. I agree with nickelsearcher - owning a genuine example, regardless of grade, is a worthy accomplishment.

@nickelsearcher: Warning! If you keep on prodded me about the book, I may just enlist you as an unpaid proofreader!

@PennyPiggy/ASLAN TVorlon: While I don't agree with your political views re: the Hawaiian or the US coinage for the Philippines (and don't believe this is the best place for such discussions), I certainly respect your viewpoints.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 01/03/2014  11:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Moe145 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Commems!!
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 Posted 11/20/2015  06:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add DrDarryl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The first commemorative coin I presented here on CCF (back in March 2012) was the 1928 Hawaiian, a half-dollar issued to mark the 150th anniversary of the "discovery" of the Hawaiian Islands by Captain James Cook, the noted British explorer. It was a relatively brief post, unlike most of my later discussions of the classic commemorative series


I commend you on presenting historical information on the Hawaiian commemorative. You have a great specimen in your collection!

Here is something that I stumbled upon in my book search of numsimatic items relating to Captain Cook. It's from a very hard to locate and out of print book.



Note that the card indicates Bank of Hawaii as the original agent. In 1986, the Bank of Hawaii cosigned 137 specimens for auction. It would have been nice to purchase one from this auction (after 58 years held by the original agent) with an original agent to first buyer pedigree.

References:
The Faces of Captain Cook by Allan Klenman
Hawaiian Money Standard Catalog 2nd Edition by Medcalf & Russell
Bowers and Merena Galleries, The 1928 Hawaiian Commemorative Half Dollars, Public Auction sale January 23, 1986
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