Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Paulina - Wife Of Maximinus I Thrax

 
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Pillar of the Community
United States
945 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2017  4:29 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Message





Practically everything known about the wife of emperor Maximinus Thrax (i.e. the Thracian) is recorded by two Roman historians who do not mention her name. Worse yet, one of the great sources of consternation for modern catalogers of the coinage for Empress Caecilia Paulina is the lack of sculptural likenesses to corroborate the visage on the coins. Humphrey Sutherland, in RIC IV pt. 2, p. 135, observes: "Both Ammianus Marcellinus and Zonaras refer to Maximinus wife, though without giving her name: and the attribution to this lady of the coins bearing the legend DIVA PAVLINA rests on the resemblance of the portraiture to that of Maximinus himself." "If, therefore, she is to be identified with the Paulina of the coins, the date of her consecration is difficult to determine."

As for the comment about family resemblance, here is a side-by-side view of all three. That the son looks like the father is not surprising. That he also bears strong resemblance to the mother might be a surprise. Let me suggest that this iconography was probably based on artistic conjecture before the new emperor and his family were likely to have been known by sight in Rome, a city that he, and perhaps they, never visited.

The Imperial family of Maximinus from 236-238,




Sutherland was aware of a monument inscription (CIL X 5054 in Atina, Campania) which records the full name of the empress as Diva Caecilia Paulina Pia Augusta, which is a bit removed from the coin inscriptions. However, another important inscription appears to have escaped him, that of a monument excavated (later?) in Paestum of Lucania:

Paestum 00048 = AE 1964, 00236
(Epigraphik-Datenbank http://db.edcs.eu/epigr/bilder.php?...64_00236.jpg $Paestum_00048.jpg )




Divae
Paulinae Aug(ustae)
C(ai) Iuli Veri Maximini
Pii Fel(icis) Imp(eratoris) Aug(usti) uxori
C(ai) Iuli Veri Maximi
matri nobilissi
mi Caes(aris)


From this we learn that the Diva Paulina Augusta, was the "most nobil" mother of Gaius Julius Verus Maximus, who had been appointed Caesar (in 236) by his Imperial father, emperor Maximinus.

Is this historical figure (Diva Paulina Augusta) to be identified with the figure on the coins which were simply inscribed DIVA PAVLINA?

In favor of this supposition is the fact that the city of Anazarbus in Cilicia struck coins in the name of "Thea Paulina" (the Greek equivalent of "Diva Paulina"), and dated them to the year 254 of that city's era which converts to 235/236 of the modern calendar. The divine reference on the coins indicates that they were produced posthumously, most probably by order of the emperor. In that case the imperial denarii can be dated to 236 or later, though not much later since the emperor and his son were themselves executed in 238.

The coinage for Paulina, all of it posthumous "consecration" issues, consisted of a single aureus, and small numbers of denarii and sestertii. The silver occurs with but two CONSECRATIO reverse types: one with Juno's peacock standing facing with tail fully spread (see above);

the other with Paulina seated waving on the back of a peacock which is flying.

Edited by lrbguy
05/30/2017 11:01 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
1304 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2017  4:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add EFLargeCents to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fantastic write up, excellent coins. The run of women of Rome coinage of late included women I do not yet have in my collection. This and the others inspire me to hold out and find the kind of excellent material thus posted. Well done Irbguy!
Edited by EFLargeCents
05/30/2017 4:56 pm
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
22287 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2017  6:32 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excellent write up and super coins.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
1299 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2017  6:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks lrb, I've learnt so much from your posts,and as I aquire new coins I will post them.

Saludos Paul
Pillar of the Community
United States
564 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2017  8:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Justinokay to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coins
Pillar of the Community
United States
4173 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2017  8:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting write-up, Irb. Great photography work on that Paulina denarius.

With regard to the appearance of Maximinus Thrax, there are two interesting Celator articles you may be interested in - assuming you haven't come across them before.

One contrasts his early, accession coinage (and portraits) with the later, more realistic "heavy chin" coinage: https://community.vcoins.com/celator-vol-10-no-08/

The other, a one-pager (page 14), is about his giant size, and it relates the later portraits with the large chin to possible evidence for excessive human growth hormone: https://community.vcoins.com/celator-vol-09-no-07/

Pillar of the Community
United States
945 Posts
 Posted 05/30/2017  11:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As always, thanks for the affirmation guys, and I hope you found something that made you want to dig into the coins a bit further.

Bob, I particularly want to thank you for the Celator references. I had not recalled them, but I was working with the study by Robert Carson in BMCRE. I am not sure I have it mastered, or that I even have the right kind of material itself, since the earliest series was repeated for types and obverse inscription by a later set of portraits which still are not the rugged images.

Here is a quick scan of what I believe at the moment to be my latest Sev. Alexander (SPES PVBLICA/IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG) and earliest Maximinus (SALVS AVGVSTI/IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG)).




The Alex has a more prominent chin than most, and the Max has a less prominent chin than most, and these are supposed to be successors. But I'm still not sure I'm assigning them to the right series in either case.

Nonetheless, I am trying to follow Carson.

Do any of you guys have examples of either of these for comparison?
Pillar of the Community
United States
516 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  01:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add augustus1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here is a website on portraits of Maximinus:
http://augustuscoins.com/ed/Maximin...ximinus.html
The resemblance of late Severus Alexander portraits to early Maximinus portraits is clear there.
My educational sites: http://augustuscoins.com/ed/
My coins for sale: http://augustuscoins.com/
My ancient-coin literature for sale: http://augustuscoins.com/numislit.html
Pillar of the Community
United States
945 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  11:25 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Ah, thank you Warren! I needed clear examples, especially for Max. Now I see the problem. I want examples that show more chin whisker for Alex and no curve to a short chin for Max.

I did some rummaging and made a quick online selection.
Here are my new exemplars. The Max is a new purchase.



The reverse of the Max is a PAX AVGVSTI
and the reverse of the Alex is a SPES PVBLICA
both sets of inscriptions are correct for the period of transition in 235.
Pillar of the Community
Belgium
1152 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  12:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add antwerpen2306 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
very nice photo's and interesting write-up,but one small error in the translation ofthe inscription on the altar : nobilissimi(male genitive) refers to Caesaris , if it was for Paulina,it has to be matri nobilissimae (female dative). albert
Pillar of the Community
United States
945 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  1:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It was really a synopsis not a translation (notice how I jumped over line 4), but you are quite right, Albert, "...mother to the most noble Caesar." mea culpa

The real point is that this inscription uses the Diva Paulina Augusta identifier, parallel to the form on the coins (minus the "Augusta") For whom else would such a coin be minted?
Pillar of the Community
Belgium
1152 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  3:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add antwerpen2306 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
No mea culpa , it is only a detail without signifiance in this context,but Latin and Greek are two of my hobbies ,so...
Interesting here is that the identification of the coins of Diva Paulina is made with numismatic and archeological objects .As far as I know , Paulina is the only woman figuring on coins and not mentioned in the texts.Congrats to mentioning it. albert
Pillar of the Community
United States
945 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  6:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Albert, the key to unraveling the identity issue seems to come from the monument stone at Phaestum. Some may wonder how it could have been missed for so long. The key to that is provided by a bit of history of the archaeology at that site, as noted in the historical notes on this article on Wikipedia (in the Wiki, which is well annotated in this case). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paestum


"The whole ancient city of Paestum covers an area of approximately 120 hectares. It is only the 25 hectares that contain the three main temples and the other main buildings that have been excavated. The other 95 hectares remain on private land and have not been excavated. "

Those excavations began in earnest (with interruptions) in 1943 with the Allied Invasion of Italy during WWII. However, excavation of the necropolis waited until the 1960s, and that digging is still going on. The inscribed stone we are looking at was apparently excavated and first published in 1964. That is too recent for inclusion in the standard references.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Spain
1299 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  6:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great info! ...but maybe start a new thread on Max?

Paul
Pillar of the Community
United States
945 Posts
 Posted 06/02/2017  6:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's going to be hard to untangle the connection to Max, since his iconography was used for a time to help identify Paulina. So recognizing the early stage images is part of the numismatic story for her too. But Albert got us back on track with the discussion of Paulina directly, and I would now want to avoid going any deeper into the coins of Maximinus in this thread. If someone got a new insight into Paulina via his coinage, so be it, but apart from that she deserves her day in the sun.

I am curious about how much provincial coinage there was for her. Anyone got anything?
Pillar of the Community
Belgium
1152 Posts
 Posted 06/03/2017  11:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add antwerpen2306 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
sorry , I can t help , it is not my area. albert
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2019 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2019 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.86 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05