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Post Your Coins With Stars

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 Posted 11/17/2021  10:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
1961 Repubblica Italiana. 500 Lire Unification Centennial.
Excellent!
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 Posted 11/18/2021  11:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1990 Republica de Costa Rica.
50 centimos.

A cultivated person is a citizen of the world*
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United Kingdom
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 Posted 11/19/2021  06:53 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1976 Bicentennial Quarter:
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 Posted 11/19/2021  10:17 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Presented here is the 1996 National Community Service commemorative silver dollar that was struck by the US Mint for the US National Community Service Trust.

Though a modern-era coin, its design is decidedly classical in nature. This is because the coin's designs are adaptations of those used for a medal created in 1905 by Frances Grimes under the direction/supervision of Augustus St. Gaudens for the Women's Auxiliary of the Massachusetts Civil Service Reform Association. (See the post at the link below for images of the original medal.) The coin's use of an allegorical female figure to represent Liberty harkens back to the designs of early US coinage and many 19th and early-20th century medals.

The coin's stars are found on its obverse, on the oval-shaped US Shield being supported by the left hand of Lady Liberty. The Shield includes 13 five-pointed stars, they are symbolic of the original 13 states of the Union.




For more on the silver dollar and medal, see:

- 1996 National Community Service Silver Dollar



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 11/21/2021  08:02 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's another US commemorative silver dollar that includes stars in its design, this one is from the two-year, 16-coin program that celebrated the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.

Atlanta Olympics silver dollars were issued in 1995 and 1996 (four each year), with the coins of each year sharing a common reverse design. Both reverse designs for the silver dollars include the logo/emblem created by the Atlanta Committee for the Games of the XXVI Olympiad (ACOG). From Olympics.com, the emblem is described as follows:

"The base of the torch mark logo, made of the five Rings and the number 100, resembles a classical Greek column and recognizes the centennial of the Games. The torch mark's flames gradually evolve into a perfect star symbolizing each athlete's pursuit of excellence."

Presented here is the 1996 silver dollar that highlights the High Jump event. The coin's obverse, depicting a high jumper in mid-jump, was the work of Calvin Massey, an outside artist ( John Mercanti of the Mint handled the design's modeling). Thomas D. Rogers, Sr. - an in-house US Mint Sculptor-Engraver - designed and modeled the reverse.

The reverse features ACOG's logo/emblem at left, with commemorative inscriptions to the right of the emblem and legally-required inscriptions around the rim. As described above, the emblem includes stars in its stylized design - one partial and three complete.

1996 Atlanta Olympics High Jump Silver Dollar



For more of a discussion of the coin's obverse, check out:

- 1996 High Jump Silver Dollar - Coins & Medals By John Mercanti Thread





Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/21/2021 1:06 pm
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 Posted 11/22/2021  1:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As a follow-up to my 1996 High Jump Silver dollar post (representing the common reverse design for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics silver dollars), I present the two 1995 gold half eagle coins of the Atlanta Olympic program: the Olympic Torch Runner and the Olympic Stadium.

Each of these obverse designs incorporates the emblem of the Atlanta Committee for the Games of the XXVI Olympiad (ACOG) as part of their respective design - the emblem includes stars. (See "High Jump Silver Dollar" post above for a description of the official Emblem.)

The obverse of the Olympic Torch Runner coin was designed by Frank Gasparro (after he had retired from the Mint); it was modeled by Mint Sculptor-Engraver John Mercanti. The design depicts an Olympic Torch Runner carrying the torch as he runs toward the Olympic Stadium and its cauldron (neither depicted); the Atlanta skyline is presented in the background.

Artist/Sculptor Marcel Jovine designed the obverse of the Olympic Stadium coin. The design presents an elevated view of the main Olympic stadium for the 1996 Games.

1995 Atlanta Games Olympic Torch Runner Gold Half-Eagle


1995 Atlanta Games Olympic Stadium Gold Half-Eagle



For more on the designs of the Atlanta Olympics 1995 gold coins, and John Mercanti's involvement in them, check out:

- 1995 Olympic Torch Runner Gold $5 - John Mercanti Coins Thread
- 1995 Olympic Stadium Gold $5 - John Mercanti Coins Thread



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/22/2021 1:26 pm
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 Posted 11/22/2021  1:43 pm  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting post, commems!

Eritrea 10 cents 1997 - the star is on the flag!
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 Posted 11/23/2021  07:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1991 silver dollar commemorating the United Service Organizations (USO) was issued to help mark the 50th anniversary of the organization. It features stars on both of its sides.

The USO is a private organization private organization that supports the recreational needs of US uniformed military personnel (and their families). It was chartered by the US Congress on February 4, 1941.

The organization was also meant to boost the morale of those serving (think Bob Hope and his USO shows!). Thousands of entertainers have taken part in USO shows/tours over the years.

The USO brought together the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA), the Salvation Army, the National Catholic Community Services, the National Travelers Aid Association and the National Jewish Welfare Board under one cooperative umbrella. The USO continues its mission to the present day. (Side Note: A similar organization, the United Seaman's Service (USS) was created in 1942 to focus on the needs of US and Allied mariners who were not enlisted personnel.)

To learn more about today's USO, visit https://www.uso.org/

The coin's obverse design is fairly simplistic. At its center, the design depicts a pennant with "USO" that is flanked by three stars each to its left and right; the pennant's design is based on the USO Flag. The stars represent the original six organizations that joined together to form the USO (see above). In calligraphy above the pennant is written "50th Anniversary." Robert Lamb, an independent, professional calligrapher and sculptor, created the design; William C. Cousins of the Mint developed the models from Lamb's drawing of the design.

Mint Sculptor-Engraver John Mercanti created the coin's reverse design. It presents an American Bald Eagle perched on a globe oriented to present North and South America as well as Europe, Africa and a tiny portion of Asia; the eagle holds a ribbon in its beak, the ribbon features "USO" inscribed on it. Eleven stars are presented in an arc below the globe.

Mercanti's "JM" initials are found below the inscription "FIFTY YEARS SERVICE" to the left of the globe and just above the topmost star; the inscription "TO SERVICE PEOPLE" is seen to the right of the globe. The two inscriptions should be read top-down, then left-right. Combined together, the two inscriptions quote the USO's anniversary theme, "Fifty years service to service people."


1991 United Service Organizations (USO) 50th Anniversary Silver Dollar



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/23/2021 08:21 am
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 Posted 11/24/2021  07:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's an example of the first gold coin of the modern US commemorative coin series. it is a Gold Eagle ($10) struck for the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics - it features stars within its reverse design.

The obverse design depicts a male and a female runner, side-by-side, jointly carrying the Olympic torch as they run; the Olympic rings, with "LOS ANGELES" inscribed above them, are seen to the left (viewer's perspective) of the male runner. The original sketch for the design was created by US Mint artist James Peed. US Mint Sculptor-Engraver John Mercanti finalized the design and created the models for the coin; both of their initials are found at about the 7:30 clock position near the rim.

The coin's reverse presents an eagle design that closely resembles the design of the Great Seal of the United States. It includes a bald eagle in heraldic display with outstretched wings. The eagle is depicted clutching a branch with 13 olive leaves in its right talon and 13 arrows in its left. Above its head is presented a constellation of 13 stars which is meant to represent a new sovereign nation joining the ranks of others of the world. The "13" theme is symbolic of the 13 original states that formed the US. The design and modeling was the work of John Mercanti; his initials are found directly below the eagle's tail feathers.

1984 Los Angeles Olympics Gold Eagle




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/24/2021 07:20 am
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 Posted 11/24/2021  2:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Time for a quick look at the 1989 half dollar that was part of a three-coin program to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the first session of the US Congress. The 1989 Congress Bicentennial commemorative coin program was authorized by Public Law 100-673. It consists of a copper-nickel clad half dollar, a silver dollar and a gold half eagle. The CuNi clad half dollar includes stars on both of its sides.

The operational structure of the US Congress was set forth in the US Constitution. It formally came into being upon the ratification of the Constitution - June 21, 1788 when New Hampshire ratified the document, the ninth of 13 states to do so. Its first official meeting, however, was held on March 4, 1789 at Federal Hall in New York City. This is the date being commemorated by the coin program.

The obverse of the Congress half dollar presents a "head shot" of the Statue of Freedom, the bronze statue that stands atop the dome of the US Capitol. The Statue was created by sculptor Thomas Gibson Crawford. Crawford was born in New York City on March 22, 1814. In 1835, he moved his home and studio to Rome, Italy where he stayed for the rest of his life. He died on October 10, 1857 in London, England, the result of cancerous eye and brain tumors that first cost him his vision, then his career and, ultimately, his life.

The plaster model of the statue was shipped to the US from Italy, in sections, after Crawford's death. The sections were cast in bronze at a foundry near Washington, DC. The final piece of the statue was put in place atop the Capitol Dome on December 2, 1863. (Side Note: The statue was originally referred to as Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace.)

The closeup image of the helmeted head of the statue on the coin's obverse reveals the helmet's stars. Four of its nine stars can be seen easily (a fifth can be seen with very close inspection). Nine? Recall note (above) regarding New Hampshire's ratification of the US Constitution.

The coin's reverse presents a full view of the east face of the Capitol Building surrounded by a segmented ring of 13 five-pointed stars - seven above and six below.

Independent artist/sculptor Patricia Lewis Verani designed and modeled the coin's obverse and independent artist/painter William Woodard created the reverse design. US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Edgar Z. Steever IV modeled the reverse.


1989 US Congress Bicentennial Half Dollar



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, check out: Commems Collection.




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 11/24/2021  3:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very nice!

The 1989 Prestige Proof Set has this half dollar. My mother bought me the 1988, 1990, and 1991 sets while I was in school. I am not sure why I did not get the 1989 set.
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