Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Finally A Rather Nice One.

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 8 / Views: 286Next Topic  
Valued Member
United States
221 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  3:47 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add gtkwml to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
A couple of years of soaking had almost no effect on a batch of crusties, so I resorted to electrolysis. I uncovered endless Constantine dynasty coins. ( Oh no, not another downed horseman!). But yesterday's session turned up this nice Tacitus, with a Fides Militvm reverse.



Bedrock of the Community
Australia
17909 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  5:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Almost like a eureka moment to end up with a Tacitus from crusty to as nice as this one!

I would appreciate it if you could write some details of your electrolysis cleaning method.
Valued Member
United States
221 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  7:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add gtkwml to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I am a trained scientist and have done much research on using electrolysis. Done wrong and it destroys coins. Done right it does absolutely NO damage to the metal surface of a coin. BUT -- it will usually remove any patina along with the other corrosion. Not a concern with badly encrusted coins, which defy soaking.

I use a battery or device charger as my electrical source.

The solution is DISTILLED water, with a small spoonful of sodium carbonate. ( Arm and Hammer washing soda). Do NOT use salt, sodium chloride, or baking soda.

The coin is held with a stainless steel clamp, which must contact the metal of the coin.

The other electrode is a carbon rod.




Valued Member
United States
221 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  7:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add gtkwml to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Valued Member
Learn More...
United States
131 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  9:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kcm to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I honor your skill at restoration. Your item is precious. You've seen to it that it lies now preserved in time,else it would be lost for all time.

This coin once mattered a great deal to some of us now lost. I doubt it will again matter as much to us who remain, but It should. I'll pause my personal use of time just now to thank you for your scientific perseverance.

Kevin
Valued Member
United States
61 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  9:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Numiscrat to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
What's your applied voltage? Do you see that making a difference?

What types of metals/alloys have worked well in this process for you? Anything that has been a disaster?
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United Kingdom
544 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  10:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That is one of the best results of electrolysis that I've seen, and a very nice coin too.

I tried electrolysis some years back with varying degrees of success. Most were coins that had been in de-ionised water for a long time without a decent result, so I gave up on crusties. I have one coin that didn't improve after being in de-ionised water for months, it didn't respond at all to electrolysis, and has been in virgin olive oil for four or five years now. The crust hasn't softened much, and only tiny fragments have been picked away. I can see bright metal around the edge where some crust has come away, but I wonder if I'll ever see a coin?
Valued Member
United States
221 Posts
 Posted 12/05/2020  11:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add gtkwml to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't know the exact voltage, just use old chargers from phones etc.

Many of the crusties yield poor images or "slugs", but many are decent and can be identified— especially by the experts at this site.

I've used electrolysis on bronze, copper, silver, and iron Civil War relics. On my Roman coins it is billon or silver coated that take repeated long electrolysis sessions.

This Licinius is another that emerged from the crust. I highlight the image by rubbing on a piece of denim. Purists are aghast by my methods, but these are crusties that resist years soaking in distilled water or olive oil.


Pillar of the Community
United States
794 Posts
 Posted 12/06/2020  11:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add travelcoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good job, it looks like you preserved the patina. I've never had such luck - always stripped coin bare. Nice to see there is still hope for this method.
  Previous TopicReplies: 8 / Views: 286Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.5 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05