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Franc Friday: 1868 Dual Denomination $5 / 50 Francs Pattern NGC PF66BN

 
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United States
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 Posted 02/19/2021  2:25 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add CCFPress to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
1868 $5 Dual Denomination $5-25 Francs, Judd-656, Pollock-729, Low R.7, PR66 Brown NGC. This coin introduces three lots that numismatically document one of the many cross-cultural collaborations between the United States and France, two countries with a long record of friendship, if not always one of perfect accord. In 1868 a Congressional bill proposed to reduce the weight of the gold half eagle by 4.1 grains to make it compatible with the French 25 francs. Designer Anthony C. Paquet (who, despite his name and French ancestry, was born not in France, but in Hamburg, Germany, in 1814) was chosen to engrave the dies, featuring the dual inscription 5 DOLLARS / 25 FRANCS. The head of Liberty (or La Liberté) faces left, her hair entwined with two ribbons, one with a diadem and LIBERTY upon it, date below and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA around. The reverse shows the dual denominations surrounded by a wreath of laurel and oak. Struck in copper with a reeded edge.



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Australia
18524 Posts
 Posted 02/19/2021  7:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Do the dies of any major and very different U.S. patterns still exist?
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Canada
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 Posted 03/10/2021  7:49 pm  Show Profile   Check SPP-Ottawa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add SPP-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Gorgeous toning!
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Content of this post is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses...0/deed.en_US

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United States
475 Posts
 Posted 03/11/2021  05:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add PNWType to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This design is looking a bit more like Le Liberté the portrait looks fairly masculine in shape to me. Great design though, the hair and band details look great.

How crazy to think we were good enough friends with france to consider a dual denom on some coinage, that sounds so farfetched
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 Posted 03/11/2021  09:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
... a dual denom on some coinage, that sounds so farfetched

And it didn't happen either!

This pattern was the result of the US participation in the International Monetary Conference held in Paris in 1867. That was two years after the formation of the Latin Monetary Union (LMU), with member states France, Belgium, Italy, and Switzerland. The conference was a French initiative with the purpose of discussing the possibilities to extend the LMU to a monetary unification "among all the civilized states." While in LMU the base denominations were 5 francs/lire in silver and 20 francs/lire in gold, the French delegates at the conference proposed a base denomination of 25 francs (in gold). That would be close to 1 British pound and 5 US dollar coins. The British and Americans would only have to adjust weight and fineness of their coins a little bit ... . Not surprisingly, the British were not the least interested in changing their traditional pound to favor any ideas from the French, and the US was not overly enthusiastic. That not even the French authorities were united in their view of a more global monetary union didn't help either (the unification ideas were supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Council of State, who favored free trade, but were opposed by the Ministry of Finance and the Bank of France, who were concerned about the effects of tying the French economy to that of less stable countries).

Anyhow, the US participation resulted in this pattern coin, but with discussions not really leading further and especially the UK opposing the whole idea, it didn't fly. And with the defeat in the Franco-Prussian war 1870, causing the end of Napoleon III and the 2nd French Empire, France became concerned with other things than trying to unite the world under a French-led monetary union.

Interestingly, there was also another pattern coin a decade later, the "Stella" 4 dollar coin (Wikipedia article), which would correspond to the traditional 20 francs coin. It would have been used if the US joined the LMU (which was still in effect), which seems like an even more odd idea ... But Liberty undoubtedly looks better on that one!
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 Posted 03/11/2021  10:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Gorgeous toning!
Agreed!


Quote:
This pattern was the result of the US participation in the International Monetary Conference held in Paris in 1867...
Very interesting! Thank you for sharing.
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