Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Post Your Coin Or Medal With Flora

First page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last 15 Replies
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 230 / Views: 6,379Next Topic
Page: of 16
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/22/2021  06:56 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Very interesting! I did not realize the significance before.

Glad to hear it! That's the primary goal of my content posts, I try to bring out small tidbits that get overlooked in the main references.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/22/2021  06:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Rhode Island Tercentenary half dollar marks the 300th anniversary of the founding of City of Providence in what would ultimately become Rhode Island. Providence was founded on the principles of freedom of religion, the individual's rights to his/her religious beliefs, as well as a tolerance of others and their beliefs.

On its obverse, the coin depicts Roger Williams, founder of the Providence Plantations colony, standing in a canoe as he comes ashore at the mouth of the Moshassuck River. He is shown with his right hand raised and offering a friendly wave to the Native American meeting him; his left hand is holding a Bible. The design's flora element is the stalk of maize/corn seen growing behind the Native American. (I've always been a bit amused at how the stalk perfectly follows the curve of the coin's circular inner frame.) The reverse of the coin presents a version of the Rhode Island State Seal.

The coin was co-designed by Newport, RI artists John Benson and Arthur Carey.

1936-D Rhode Island Tercentenary Half Dollar





I've posted before about the Rhode Island coin:

- 1936 Rhode Island Tercentenary
- 1936 Rhode Island Tercentenary - Revisited
- Horace Grant & the 1936 Rhode Island Half Dollar

Other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
Canada
18297 Posts
 Posted 05/22/2021  11:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1894 Republica de Guatemala.
4 Reales.


Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
Canada
18297 Posts
 Posted 05/23/2021  12:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
2004 Malaysia
50 Sen - Agong

Obverse
A hibiscus flower blossom (Binomial name: Hibiscus rosa-Sinensis), the national flower of Malaysia,
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/23/2021  07:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Wisconsin Territorial Centennial half dollar was issued "in commemoration of the one-hundredth anniversary of the establishment of the Territorial Government of Wisconsin, and to assist in the celebration of the Wisconsin Centennial during the year of 1936. (US Public Law 74-593)

The obverse of the coin is where the flora element is to be found. Though today's grading services and most collectors consider the Seal side of the coin to be its obverse, per the US Mint, the official obverse of the coin is the side with the badger. The badger is depicted on a log with three arrows (left) and a somewhat stylized olive branch (right) behind it; the badger has been the official state animal since 1957, but important to Wisconsin residents since its beginnings. The arrows symbolize the major, pre-territory clashes of the Black Hawk War, while the olive branch is meant to represent the eventual peace achieved between Wisconsin settlers and the local Native Americans.

A largely-accurate depiction of first Great Seal of the Wisconsin Territory is presented on the coin's reverse. It depicts a muscular, though disembodied, arm holding a pickaxe with a pile of lead ore in the background. (See the "Coins With Hands Thread" link below for more details and an image of the original Seal.)

The basic design for the coin and use of the Seal was suggested by the Wisconsin Centennial Commission. Benjamin Hawkins created the final models for the coin based on an initial interpretation of the Commission's design concepts by David Parsons.

1936 Wisconsin Territorial Centennial Half Dollar




You can read more about the Wisconsin Territory Centennial half dollar here:

- 1936 Wisconsin Territorial Centennial
- 1936 Wisconsin Territorial Centennial - Revisited
- 1936 Wisconsin Territorial Centennial - Coins With Hands Thread

Note: These earlier post use the prevalent thinking regarding obverse/reverse. The side specification included in this post is the official description per the Mint.

My stories about other commemorative coins are found here: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
9295 Posts
 Posted 05/23/2021  09:38 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another beautiful coin, commems!

1986 British pound coin showing a flax plant:

The flax is a symbol of Northern Ireland. Coins bearing this reverse were issued in 1986 and 1991. Other coins in this series showed the Oak Tree (England), Leek (Wales) and Thistle (Scotland). Like the English and Scottish shillings of 1937-66, they were all legal tender across all parts of the United Kingdom. Whilst it was nice for collectors to have different designs in circulation, the frequent changes of design on such a high-value coin were a boon to the counterfeiters, as most members of the public could not keep up with all the different types, and thus were less likely to spot a counterfeit or a stray foreign coin of about the right dimensions if they received one in change.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/23/2021  6:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@NumisRob: Too bad about the counterfeiting. From afar, I liked the idea of the rotating designs on the round pound.

I made a couple of trips to England when these were in circulation, and brought a few back with me. Good stuff!




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/23/2021  6:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I almost didn't include the 1937 Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary commemorative half dollar in this "Flora" thread because, while its reverse design incorporates multiple mature trees, they do not carry a symbolic meaning germane to the event being commemorated. I changed my mind, however, when I realized that the peaceful scene on the coin is nothing like the much more barren landscape that surrounded the bridge at the time of the Civil War battle in September 1862. With this realization, I considered nature's ability to heal and renew itself - much like the nation had to after the Civil War (CW) was over. And that parallel got the coin included!

Here are a pair of photographs, taken at the time of the battle, that show a landscape around the bridge that is very stark in comparison to the coin's depiction of the famous bridge. Today, the bridge is known as the Burnside Bridge, but, at the time of the CW, is was referred to simply as the Lower Bridge over Antietam Creek.



(Image Credit: Both images Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Public Domain.)

Clearly, William Marks Simpson, the coin's designer, chose to present a more idyllic scene of the bridge that is likely representative of its appearance at the time of the anniversary vs. the date of the battle.

1937 Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary Half Dollar


Here's a current view of the bridge and its surroundings:


(Image Credit: National Park Service, Digital Asset Management System. Public Domain.)


You can read more about the coin here:

- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - Revisited
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - A Look At Its Stars
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - Coins with Beards Thread
- 1937 Battle of Antietam Half Dollar - Coins Depicting Places Thread


For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, see: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
Canada
18297 Posts
 Posted 05/23/2021  10:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1971 Bermuda.
10 Cents - Elizabeth II 2nd portrait.

Reverse
Bermuda Lily
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/24/2021  07:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1937 Roanoke Colony Memorial half dollar was issued to jointly commemorate the 350th anniversary of Sir Walter Raleigh's attempt at establishing a permanent colony on Roanoke Island, North Carolina, and the birth of Virginia Dare - the first child of English parentage born in the New World. Virginia was born on August 18, 1587.

The flora element on the Roanoke half dollar is a minor design element incorporated into the coin's reverse. Elinor Dare, wife of Ananias Dare, is the central element. Elinor is depicted standing and holding the newborn Virginia. As a bit of background...John White, the appointed governor of the colony, was Virginia's grandfather. John recruited his daughter Elinor and her new husband Ananias to be part of the colony.

Directly behind Elinor is seen a pine tree sapling. The sapling is symbolic of "new" and the promise of future growth, a promise to which the new colony aspired.

Though I have never seen anything more than a generic "pine tree sapling" reference in the books about US commemorative coins, it would not surprise me to learn that William Marks Simpson specifically depicted a Shortleaf Pine sapling on the coin. It is a very common variety of pine tree in North Carolina, is found across the state, including within the coastal region and its saplings closely resemble the sapling on the coin. Simpson is known to have visited the site of the Roanoke Colony, so it seems very plausible that he saw many Shortleaf Pine saplings during his time there and used one or more of them as the reference source for the sapling on the coin's reverse.

Simpson, of Baltimore, is also credited with developing the designs for the 1936 Norfolk Bicentennial / Tricentennial half dollar (along with his wife, Marjory Emory Simpson) and the 1937 Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary half dollar; each of these coins have been included in this thread. (See links below.)

1937 Roanoke Colony Memorial Half Dollar




I have made several posts about the 1937 Roanoke half dollar, you can check them out here: Read More: Commems Collection

To see the "flora" discussion regaring Simpson's other US commemorative coin designs, see:

- 1936 Norfolk Tricentennial/Bicentennal Half Dollar - Coins Depicting Flora Thread
- 1937 Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary Half Dollar - Coins Depicting Flora Thread



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
9295 Posts
 Posted 05/24/2021  07:25 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
2009 UK Kew Gardens 50p:


Originally founded by Princess Augusta , mother of King George II, in 1759, Kew Gardens has plants and trees from all over the world. The famous Chinese Pagoda was erected in the gardens in 1762, and the palm House was built in 1848. During World War II vegetables were grown in the gardens to support the war effort. The 50p coin was issued to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the gardens, and is the lowest mintage 50p coin issued for circulation, with a mintage figure of 210,000, plus 128,364 in BU sets and 7,575 silver Proofs. My photo is of a BU coin in its original Royal Mint packaging: I've now sorted through 13,040 50p coins in the past few years and have yet to pull one from circulation!
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
104701 Posts
 Posted 05/24/2021  10:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I almost didn't include the 1937 Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary commemorative half dollar in this "Flora" thread because, while its reverse design incorporates multiple mature trees, they do not carry a symbolic meaning germane to the event being commemorated. I changed my mind, however, when I realized that the peaceful scene on the coin is nothing like the much more barren landscape that surrounded the bridge at the time of the Civil War battle in September 1862. With this realization, I considered nature's ability to heal and renew itself - much like the nation had to after the Civil War (CW) was over. And that parallel got the coin included!
Brilliant way to make the connection!
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/24/2021  6:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I previously posted about the olive branch on the reverse of the 1934-38 Texas Independence Centennial half dollars and its use as a representation of peace. (See link below.) This time out, I'm taking a look at the flora on the coin's obverse.

The viewer's eye is naturally drawn to either the eagle or large star on the coin's obverse, but a closer look will reveal the oak branch that is also part of the design. Is the eagle holding a small part of an oak branch in its talons or is it perched on an oak branch that has been presented without its tree? I'm not sure, but I tend to favor the "perched eagle on a tree branch (sans tree)" perspective. In any case, the oak branch is included to symbolize the strength and power of Texas and its residents. ("Don't mess with Texas!")***

The coin's designs were created by Pompeo Coppini, an Italian-born artist who emigrated to the United States in 1896; he became a naturalized US citizen in 1902. He moved around a bit based on the work/commissions that came his way. He began in New York City, moved to Chicago then Texas, then back to New York and then back to Texas. He was maintaining a studio in New York and working on a multi-year commission when he was selected by the Texas Centennial Commission to design and sculpt their coin.

For many, Coppini's designs make for a winning coin! Like the designs or not, it's hard to argue against the man's talents!

1934-38 Texas Independence Centennial Half Dollar




If you'd like to learn more about the Texas half dollar, check out:

- 1935 Texas Independence Centennial
- Texas Centennial - There Could Have Been Five!
- Texas Independence Centennial - Coins Depicting Places Thread
- Texas Independence Centennial - Coins with Hats Thread
- Texas Independence Centennial - Mythology on Coins Thread
- Texas Independence Centennial (Reverse) - Coins Depicting Flora Thread

I also have other commemorative coin and medal posts that can be found at: Read More: Commems Collection.


*** "Don't mess with Texas!" was created as the slogan for a roadway anti-littering campaign in Texas managed by the Texas Department of Transportation; it dates to 1986. Over time, the meaning of the phrase has expanded beyond its initial purpose - especially among those not familiar with its true origin story - and today often is used, informally, to represent general Texas pride and toughness.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
9295 Posts
 Posted 05/25/2021  04:10 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Stunning coin, commems! And thanks for pointing out the origin of "Don't Mess With Texas!" A few years ago someone brought back a fridge magnet from their vacation with that on it...

Here's another olive branch on a coin - 2 cents from Malta. This coin bears one of the new reverse designs introduced in 1986:
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
6538 Posts
 Posted 05/25/2021  09:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
thanks for pointing out the origin of "Don't Mess With Texas!" A few years ago someone brought back a fridge magnet from their vacation with that on it...

You're welcome! There's almost always something to learn from the study of a coin!

Thank you for your continued participation in the thread and for the background info on the coins you post. Much appreciated!



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
05/25/2021 09:25 am
Page: of 16 Previous TopicReplies: 230 / Views: 6,379Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.5 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05