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Commems Collection: A Quick Look At Green's "Mint Record And Type Table"

 
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 Posted 10/10/2021  6:56 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
A few years ago, I took a quick look at the commemorative coin section of Fell's United States Coin Book. The book was the Fourth Edition of the reference, and was published in 1958. One of the features of the book that I commented on was its use of drawings to illustrate the coins it presented vs. photographic images. By 1958, most coin books were using photographs to illustrate their coins, so the Fell's book was an outlier for its time.

Tonight, I thought I'd rewind a couple of decades and present a look at a book published in 1936 - Mint Record and Type Table / United State Coins arranged by C. E. Green. It was created to provide collectors with a comprehensive check list of US coins to help them keep track of their collection. It does not include market values for the coins, but does include a dotted line/space for a collector to write down the price and grade of the coins in his or her cabinet.

From what I've seen, it was not the first time Green had published such a volume, but it was his most complete and appears to have been the most commercially successful (based on the frequency at which they are found in today's marketplace vs. earlier editions). Like the Fell's book, Green's volume illustrates the coins it covers with drawings vs. photographs. Also like in the Fell's book, some drawings are better than others!

The growing list of US commemorative coins at the time did not appear to have impressed Green very much, as the commemorative section is the very last one included in the book and follows sections on "Private Gold," "California Gold," "Encased Postage Stanps" and "Postage and Fractional Currency." As with the other sections, the book presents only limited information on each issue, basicaly mints where struck and mintages (authorized and net).

Presented here are a few pages from the "U. S. Commemorative Coins" chapter of Green's reference work.

Green's Mint Record and Type Table Book: Title Page


Green's Mint Record and Type Table Book: Columbian and Isabella Page


Green's Mint Record and Type Table Book: Illinois, Maine and Pilgrim Page


Green's Mint Record and Type Table Book: Oregon Trail and Vermont-Bennington Page


Green's Mint Record and Type Table Book: Bay Bridge, and Elgin Page



Green's Mint Record and Type Table Book: Panama-Pacific Gold $50 Page


To read my earlier post on the Fell's book, check out:

- A Look At The Commemorative Chapter Of Fell's United States Coin Book"



For other of my posts on commemorative coins and medals, check out: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 10/11/2021  04:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is interesting on many level commems, thanks for sharing.

The reference to 2500 Lincoln (Illinois) halves 'sold at face value' dovetails directly into my interest in circulated commemoratives. Do you have any insight into the source data to support Mr. Green's conclusion?

To expand even further on the topic of released into circulation at face value, perhaps I can suggest you consider writing on the topic with any insights you have gained through your research.

A fun element of that discussion would be to compare the original asking price for the various coins, many of which were surely sold to collectors of the day at a premium before the excess issues were released into commerce.

I would enjoy that discussion. Of course, I'll temper my enthusiasm if you respond with 'it's planned for chapter x in the upcoming book'.
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.jk-dk.art
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 Posted 10/11/2021  1:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The reference to 2500 Lincoln (Illinois) halves 'sold at face value' dovetails directly into my interest in circulated commemoratives. Do you have any insight into the source data to support Mr. Green's conclusion?

I was hoping that someone would pick up on this and ask a question!

To my knowledge, there are two known/verified sources of 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial half dollars that saw circulation:

1) Q. David Bowers reports that a bank in Iowa City, Iowa received a $1,000 bag of Illinois half dollars (2,000 coins) in 1919 as fulfillment of an order it placed for regular-issue half dollars. As coins of the denomination were needed locally, the bank tried to distribute them alongside regular-issue half dollar coins. It appears, however, that the task proved more difficult than expected as local residents were hesitant to accept the coins due to their lack of familiarity with them/their design. (The Walking Liberty design was also relatively new at the time.) Eventually, the bulk of the coins did get distributed.

2) It is known that a bank in Springfield, IL discovered ~30,000 Illinois Statehood Centennial half dollars in its vault when an inventory audit was conducted in 1933 during the Franklin D. Roosevelt declared "Bank Holiday;" it is believed that the coins had initially been purchased (and held) for the local Chamber of Commerce in 1918. It's also known that the majority of the discovered coins were sold to coin dealers at a small advance over face value, but that a portion of the coins were released into circulation.

Was the number released truly 2,500? The Green book is the only reference I've seen in which a specific number for the coins released into circulation has been published. Did he have inside information due to his Illinois residency? Did the bank in question officially report the figure locally and Green became aware of it? Did he publish his best estimate based on anecdotal information?

I don't know, but I continue to look for an answer!

To your other request/comment...I've started a post about classic-era US commemorative coins that were placed into circulation, but it's still in early draft form. I'm not sure when I'll get back to it to complete it, but I'll try to bump it up on the list!

I briefly referenced the Springfield Bank situation in a previous post: 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial - Trivia.

I'll update things when/if I find more.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 10/12/2021  05:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Appreciate the follow up information commems. I do recall now your mention of the Springfield IL bank incident.

It's amazing when you start digging into the details behind these coins how much there is to learn. Your obvious passion for gaining that knowledge through independent research shines through in every post.
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.jk-dk.art
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 Posted 10/12/2021  07:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
It's amazing when you start digging into the details behind these coins how much there is to learn.

I agree! Someone could spend years researching the details.

Oh, wait...


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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