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Post Your Coins/Medals/Tokens That Are Intentionally Dual-Dated

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 Posted 08/15/2022  06:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Norfolk Advertising Board, Inc. sponsored a dual commemorative half dollar in 1936 to mark the 300th anniversary of the land grant that led to the founding of the Village of Norfolk and the 200th anniversary of the establishment of the Borough of Norfolk.

At the center of the coin's obverse design - its Bicentennial side - is a three-mast sailing ship, a plow and three sheaves of wheat; the design was taken directly from the City of Norfolk Seal that dates to 1912 and is symbolic of the city's port and the area's agricultural interests. The obverse includes four dates: 1) Town - 1682, 2) Borough - 1736, and 3) City - 1845, plus the year when struck - 1936.

The coin's reverse features the Royal Mace of Norfolk, with "16" and "36" flanking it (the coin's fifth date). The Royal Mace is a link to the City's original Land Grant of 1636.

1936 Norfolk Bicentennial / Tricentennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the Norfolk half dollar, see: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/15/2022  07:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 Providence, Rhode Island Tercentenary Half Dollar (aka, the "Rhode Island") was struck to mark the 300th anniversary of the settlement of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations by Roger Williams in 1636.

The coin's obverse design depicts Roger Williams being greeted by a local Native American as he lands his canoe at the mouth of the Moshassuck River near present-day Providence, RI. The coin's dual dates of "1636" (settlement) and "1936" (year struck) are included at the rim just below the nine o'clock and three o'clock positions.

The reverse design of the coin presents a shield with the anchor of Hope as seen on the State's Seal.

1936 Rhode Island Tercentenary



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Rhode Island coin, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/15/2022  10:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is a really strong topic with examples that keep coming!


Quote:
The 1936 Columbia, SC Sesquicentennial Half Dollar was struck to mark the city's 150th anniversary as the capital of South Carolina.
Always a favourite of mine.
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 Posted 08/15/2022  1:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
More modern gold

50th anniversary of WW2



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 Posted 08/15/2022  1:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1995 w XXVI Stadium



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 Posted 08/15/2022  1:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
2008 Jackson's Liberty



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 Posted 08/15/2022  5:31 pm  Show Profile   Check daltonista's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add daltonista to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

This one-penny Irish token is one of two that were struck in or about 1816 for Edward Bewley, reputedly a grocer in Dublin. Celebrated here is the elevation in 1814 of Arthur Wellesley to the Dukedom of Wellington. This military hero and political prodigy was renowned and revered all over the British Isles -- but particularly in Dublin, his birthplace -- for his heroism and leadership during a series of stunning victories in the Peninsular Campaign of the Napoleonic Wars. In 1815 he teamed up with the Prussian and Silesian troops of von Blucher to finally defeat Napoleon's army at Waterloo, bringing twelve grueling years of war to a conclusion at last.

While this laureate and draped bust of Wellington appears on about a dozen Irish tokens of this era, the effigy on the Bewley penny is the only one accompanied by the 1814 date beneath. Interestingly, Bewley's other penny token has a slightly different bust and omits that date below, thus standing as an 1816-only issue.

Withers 1810, Davis 10 (Dublin), 16g, 34mm. "Common."


I never pay too much for my tokens...but every now and then I may buy one a little too soon.

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 Posted 08/15/2022  6:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@daltonista: Nice token! Thanks for posting and joining the discussion! I always enjoy the history you add.


Quote:
reputedly a grocer in Dublin

Do you not believe he was?


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 Posted 08/15/2022  10:48 pm  Show Profile   Check daltonista's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add daltonista to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Do you not believe he was?

Thanks, commems...good to be back.

I think I meant to use the word "reportedly" there.

Davis identified Bewley as a grocer in his 1904 catalog, even providing an address, but Withers couldn't confirm that almost a century later with contemporary 1816-ish documentation such as advertising and city directories. Withers does report a different Bewley at a different Dublin address in another line of business entirely (silk), so I didn't want to choose sides, so to speak. Upon reflection, going with "said to be a grocer" would probably have been the more diplomatic phrase...especially since I do business with Paul and Bente Withers from time to time.

Good eye, though. editorially speaking!

I never pay too much for my tokens...but every now and then I may buy one a little too soon.

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 Posted 08/16/2022  07:39 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In 1936, the US issued a half dollar to commemorate the centennial of the establishment of the Wisconsin Territory. When it was created on July 4, 1836, the Wisconsin Territory occupied a much larger area than the present-day State of Wisconsin; it also included what is now Minnesota and Iowa, as well as portions of North and South Dakota.

The coin features elements of the first Great Seal of the Wisconsin Territory on its obverse, namely, an arm holding a pickaxe with a pile of lead ore in the background; a new Seal was adopted in 1839 - it did not include the arm with pickaxe or pile of lead ore. The coin's dual dates "1836" (Territory Establishment) and "1936" (Year Struck) are found on the obverse. The coin features the full calendar date of the Territory's creation - July 4, 1836 AD.

The coin's reverse design features a badger on a log with arrows (left) and an olive branch (right) behind it; the badger has been the official state animal only since 1957, but it has been important to Wisconsin residents since its earliest days.

1936 Wisconsin Territorial Centennial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Wisconsin half dollar, see: Commems Collection.

For a discussion of other US commemorative coins with a full calendar date, see:

- Quick Bits #46 - Calendar Dates On Classic Coins
- Quick Bits #47 - Calendar Dates On Modern Coins



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
08/16/2022 07:45 am
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 Posted 08/16/2022  07:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 York County, Maine Tercentenary Half Dollar is one of the coins in the classic-era US commemorative coin series that uses questionable dates for its celebrated anniversary. In this case, a problem arises when considering the County's founding date. The coin was issued to mark the 300th anniversary of the founding of York County, Maine, and the coin's 1936 issue date suggests the County's founding occurred back in 1636. The County was actually established in November 1652, not in 1636. But let's not let such details stop us!

The coin's obverse design depicts Brown's Garrison, believed to be one of the first stockades built in York County. The coin's reverse design features the Seal of York County. These "official" designations of obverse and reverse are opposite of the "adopted" conventions used by most of today's collectors and the third-party grading services - they are official, however, coming from the US Mint.

The anniversary milestone dates of "1636" (Founding) and "1936" (Year Struck) are found on the coin's reverse; they flank the shield of the Seal.

1936 York County, ME Tercentenary



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and design of the York County half dollar, see: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/16/2022  07:48 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary half dollar commemorates the bloodiest single day of the Civil War -- 17 September 1862. During the battle, the first major battle on Union soil, it is estimated that over 23,000 soldiers were either killed or wounded. The battle took place in Washington County, MD, in the vicinity of Sharpsburg.

Conjoined portraits of General Robert E. Lee (foreground) who led the Confederate forces, and General George McClellan (background), leader of the Union forces, are seen on the coin's obverse. The reverse design depicts the Burnside Bridge over Antietam Creek - site of some of the fiercest fighting of the battle. The coin was designed by William Marks Simpson.

The dual dates on the Antietam half dollar's reverse are a bit more subtle than many of the other classic-era commemorative coins, with "1862" being part of "September 17, 1862" - the calendar date of the battle, and its anniversary date of "1937" (also the year of striking) seen separately at the reverse rim at the six o'clock position.

1937 Battle of Antietam 75th Anniversary



For a discussion of other US commemorative coins with a full calendar date, see:

- Quick Bits #46 - Calendar Dates On Classic Coins
- Quick Bits #47 - Calendar Dates On Modern Coins


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 08/17/2022  07:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1937 Roanoke Colony Memorial Half Dollar commemorates the 350th anniversary of the failed colonization attempt at Roanoke Island (then a part of Virginia, today a part of North Carolina), as well as of the first child of English descent born in America - Virginia Dare.

The coin's obverse design features a portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh, the sponsor/organizer of the colonization attempt; Raleigh did not travel to the colony. The obverse also bears the year "1937," the year mandated to appear by the coin's authorizing legislation. The reverse design portrays Eleanor Dare holding the infant Virginia. The "1587-1937" dual dates for the anniversary being celebrated are found below the figure of Eleanor on the reverse. Another triple-date coin!

The coin was designed by William Marks Simpson; he also designed the 1936 Norfolk, VA and 1937 Battle of Antietam commemorative half dollars.

1937 Roanoke Colony Memorial



For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more on the history and designs of the Roanoke half dollar, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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