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Commems Collection Medals: 1964 John F. Kennedy Memorial Medals

 
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 Posted 09/24/2022  09:10 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Most collectors are aware that North Carolina was once home to the Charlotte Mint, a US Branch Mint that struck Gold Dollar, Gold Quarter Eagle ($2.50) and Gold Half Eagle ($5.00) coins between 1838 and 1861. Far fewer collectors are aware that it is not the only mint to have called the "Tar Heel State" home.

In 1962, Aaron C. Schultz founded Capitol Medals ("Capitol") in High Point, NC and entered the numismatic marketplace with a medal series called "States of the Union." He was looking to capture some of the market that was created after the US issued its last classic-era commemorative coin in 1954.

Shortly after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, Capitol expanded beyond its "States" series and announced the release of a memorial medal in his honor. The obverse of the medal presents a left-facing portrait of Kennedy; the reverse features his famous "Ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can do for your country" quote taken from his 1961 inaugural address; the quote is encircled by 50 stars. The Eternal Flame at Kennedy's grave site is also depicted on the medal's reverse at the six o'clock position, it is flanked by an olive branch representing Peace stretching to the left and an oak branch symbolic of Strength to the right.

Available beginning in February 1964, the medal was struck to the same size specifications as the "States" medals (i.e., 1-17/32"). They were available in 0.999 fine silver for $10.00, bronze "silver satin" oxidized for $3.50 and bronze oxidized for $2.50. A three troy ounce silver version ($100.00) and a pure platinum version ($750.00) were also available. I haven't seen any final mintage/sales figures for the medals, so I can't say how aligned they are with the maximum limits published.

The maximum mintage for the 0.999 fine small silver Kennedy medal (Proof) was listed as 15,000 pieces; the three-ounce silver piece mintage was listed as 104. A maximum of 25 platinum pieces were available for ordering. The base metal versions had unlimited mintages.

The JFK Memorial medal program also included custom-made plastic holders designed to store either one or two medals; the holders were available separately. The one-medal holder cost $2.10; the two-medal holder was $4.00 (prices without medals). The holder was available with either a white or black insert with gold lettering.

Shown here are my bronze "silver satin" oxidized (obverse) and bronze oxidized (reverse) medals in the custom plastic holder. It doesn't include any mark to indicate it, but the holder appears to match those produced by Capital Plastics, a non-affiliated company that was/is known for its coin and currency holders. (Don't quote me on such a provenance, but I'd bet a nickel on it!)


Note: I have removed the clear front and back panels from the three-piece holder to enable a clearer picture of the white insert and medals.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 09/24/2022  11:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Not the most inspiring image!
Edited by Coinfrog
09/24/2022 11:36 am
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 Posted 09/25/2022  7:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Not the most inspiring image!

I agree - much better numismatic portraits of JFK exist, but the quote on the reverse of the medal helped to inspire a nation!

Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 09/26/2022  05:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting thread commems - I never knew of the existence of the private mint in High Point.


Quote:
the quote on the reverse of the medal helped to inspire a nation!


I agree with that sentiment.
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