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Commems Collection: 1935 Connecticut Ephemera II

 
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 Posted 01/21/2014  9:02 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
In previous posts, I've discussed the 1935 Connecticut Tercentenary half-dollar, the various boxes used to distribute the coins and the official commemorative medal (http://goccf.com/t/115266 and http://goccf.com/t/150343 ).

Tonight I thought I'd share some information on another of the official souvenirs of the Connecticut State Tercentenary Commission.

One of the publications produced by the Commission was An Almanack of the Connecticut Tercentenary Celebrn (they ran out of room on the title page for "Celebration" so they abbreviated it!). The brief booklet served as a summary of the state's 300th anniversary celebrations, educational programs and historical exhibits. It also presented "Facts of Interest" about Connecticut and included various historical notes about the state.

Read More: Commems Collection

The booklet also discussed the various "Historical Publications" that were published by Yale University for the tercentenary and the "Official Souvenirs" of the Commission. Following is an image of the page describing the various souvenirs.



At the bottom of the image you'll note the description of "four souvenir plates designed by Mr. Frederick Dunn." As I strive for "completeness" when it comes to my commemorative coins, I've added each of the plates to my collection. The "Wyllys Mansion and Charter Oak" plate has the most direct link to the half-dollar, though the image of the tree shown on the plate is not as dramatic as the depiction on the coin. At the edge of the plate is seen a wreath of grapes tied together with ribbons featuring the names of a dozen prominent Connecticut towns/cities.

From the Connecticut State Library web page on George Wyllys: "In 1636 he sent his steward, William Gibbons, along with twenty domestics and indentured servants, to Hartford to purchase lands and oversee building of a house. He had the largest home lot of any of the early Hartford settlers, and one of the largest homes in Connecticut. The famous Charter Oak stood on his property." (More information on George Wyllys can be found here: http://www.cslib.org/gov/wyllysg.htm.)

So, for everyone who enjoys large, ceramic "coins," I present the "Wyllys Mansion and Charter Oak" commemorative plate (and my example of the 1935 Connecticut half-dollar).








Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 01/22/2014  3:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bpoc1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Commems, you are kidding me.

Quote:
So, for everyone who enjoys large, ceramic "coins," I present the "Wyllys Mansion and Charter Oak" commemorative plate (and my example of the 1935 Connecticut half-dollar).

Did I read this right? You have an original ceramic plate. Amazing!
Let alone a MS65
Again thank you!
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 Posted 01/22/2014  5:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Did I read this right? You have an original ceramic plate.
"Sadly" I have all four of the plates sold by Connecticut Tercentenary Commission!


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 01/22/2014  6:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wow, this is incredible. Your dedication to the historical context continues to amaze me.
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 Posted 01/22/2014  7:04 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MeadowviewCollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is another great article commems.



-MV
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 Posted 01/22/2014  7:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Humbly apologize for the delayed reply to another of your tremendous posts commems ... we have been slammed by snow/cold here in MD and I have spent most of the previous 28 hours awake and at work.

I believe the sentiment previously expressed by many of us sums up feelings quite nicely ... the depth and breadth of your collection, and most importantly your unparalleled ability to place the collection in historical context, makes your collection and contributions an amazing and invaluable resource for all of us.


Quote:
I have all four of the plates sold by Connecticut Tercentenary Commission!


Why does this not surprise me?

I googled the visible names on your plate #1 of 4 ... Canteberry ... Pomfret ... Windham ... Ashford ... Stonington and Groten.

Learned a bit in my tired state about Connecticut history ... and as such appreciated the chance to gain some transient knowledge about your tremendous set.

Wondering if I should search out the 3 cent stamp mentioned in the brochure? ... I do indeed enjoy the Charter Oak image.

Many thanks commems for your continued sharing ....

Still wondering about the book.

David
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.finewoodcrafter.com
Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
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 Posted 01/22/2014  10:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MeadowviewCollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Wondering if I should search out the 3 cent stamp mentioned in the brochure? ... I do indeed enjoy the Charter Oak image.


Here's a link that shows you what the stamp looks like http://www.1847usa.com/ByYear/1935.htm

I quickly browsed eBay and there were a few BIN's for an unused single stamp. The prices seemed reasonable, but I don't know much about stamps.

-MV
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 Posted 01/23/2014  12:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here is a public domain image of the painting by Charles De Wolf Brownell that was used as the model for the coin as well as the stamps. (It does not, however, appear to have been used as the model for the plate!)


Courtesy of the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
01/23/2014 12:20 pm
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 Posted 01/25/2014  2:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Moe145 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Incredible post, as per usual, Commems!!



Question:

Did PCGS accidentally misspell "Connecticut" on the slab? Is that space limited in the number of letters they can print? (It sure looks like there could be more letters printed there...)

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