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Commems Collection Modern: 1976 Bicentennial Clad Layer Errors

 
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 Posted 04/16/2015  4:20 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I've posted before about one of my 1776-1976 US Bicentennial coinage errors: http://goccf.com/t/159418.

Today, I thought I'd "show-and-tell" about a Bicentennial set I recently added to my collection - a set of reverse clad layer missing coins.

In 1965, the US changed the planchets it used for its traditional circulating silver coinage from solid silver (90% silver/10% copper) to one comprised of three layers. For the dime and quarter, the new "sandwich" planchets were made of a pure copper core in between layers of 75% copper/25% nickel. The 1965-70 half-dollar planchet consisted of outer layers of 80% silver/20% copper and an inner core of 20.9% silver/79.1% copper - it produced a 40% silver (by weight) planchet. From 1971, the circulating half-dollar planchet was the same composition as that used for the circulating dime and quarter.

Read More: Commems Collection

The use of clad planchets created an entirely new area for error coin collectors to pursue. Namely, "sandwich" coins that were struck on planchets that were missing one (or both) of the copper-nickel layers that surrounded the copper core. Coins struck on these "missing clad layer" planchets have their design pressed into the copper core and result in a "red" coin rather than one with the expected silvery appearance. Missing layer coins are available for all of the clad denominations and can be found with either the obverse or reverse struck on the side with the missing layer; they can also be found for most (if not all) years since 1965. On rare occasions, coins can be found that were struck only on the inner core (i.e., with both clad layers missing!).

For quite some time, I've thought about assembling a set of Bicentennial reverse clad layer missing coins, I thought they would present an interesting contrast to the standard coins. As they are reasonably scarce, however, they do not come on the market with great frequency. Recently, I had the opportunity to acquire a nice mint state set and so decided to take the plunge.

Here they are!








Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
04/16/2015 11:23 pm
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 Posted 04/16/2015  4:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bpoc1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Commems, thank you again for a wealth of information.
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 Posted 04/16/2015  5:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Those are very nice. Thank your for posting the story and the photos. I am sure many will enjoy this.
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 Posted 04/16/2015  7:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Outstanding commems ... truly an esoteric branch of the hobby to pursue ... but admittedly with an amazing story and challenges.

I note the influence granted by your friend ... and salute your ability to actually acquire all three of these examples ... treasures indeed.

Best - David
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.finewoodcrafter.com
Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
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 Posted 04/16/2015  9:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Hondo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wow, what a great idea for a set.

As always commems, thanks for sharing.
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 Posted 04/16/2015  11:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One note to add...

One diagnostic used to determine whether a coin truly has a missing clad layer is the coin's weight - a coin with a missing clad layer is lighter than standard.

Here are the standard weights for these coins so that you can quickly compare with the weights specified on the labels shown:

Quarter Dollar: 5.67 grams
Half Dollar: 11.34 grams
Dollar: 22.68 grams

You'll find that each of the coins shown is 17.1% lighter than standard.

From that you now know that the two clad layers make up ~34% of each coin's total weight and the inner copper core is ~66% of the coin's weight.

And that concludes today's math lesson!

Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 04/17/2015  12:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MeadowviewCollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A neat trio commems I've never seen the missing clad layer on a Bicentennial before.


-MV
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 Posted 04/18/2015  12:07 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you for posting the weight information, especially the percentages. I was never quit sure about the clad to core ratio.
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 Posted 04/18/2015  01:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CelticKnot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Just catching this thread - very cool, commems. Thank you for sharing the lore and the photos.
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