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Canadian Cheque Chat

 
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Pillar of the Community
Canada
1118 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  01:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Harmonica to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Let us look at Canadian Deaths 1878-1886: Abstracted from The Dominion Annual Register and Review once again.


Quote:
DOMVILLE, James Wm. (Lieut.-Genl.), Royal Artillery - Born August 2, 1817 at Greenwich, England - Died November 19, 1883 Kingshurst, Rothesay, New Brunswick - Died at his son's residence. He was of royal descent. He came to Canada in 1875 and settled in New Brunswick - (Obit. 83).


His son, James Domville Jr. played a role in founding The Maritime Bank of the Dominion of Canada. The bank building still stands today. It is known as the "Bomville Building"

The Domville Building in Saint John is a historic building. It was made out of brick after the fire (as was the Saint John Free Public Library)

http://historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg...aspx?id=1443


Quote:
This building is significant as one of a collection of Italianate and Second Empire style commercial buildings built between 1877 and 1881 after two thirds of the City of Saint John was destroyed in the Great Saint John Fire of 1877. The Second Empire building also exhibits significant Greek architectural features and a unique design. The Domville Building was built for the Maritime Bank of Saint John in 1878. The building includes an associative value with its founder, Senator James Domville, for whom the building was named. He owned the land on which the building was built and laid the corner stone. A member of the Canadian Senate for eighteen years, Domville is the only Canadian Senator born in Honduras. He was also the founder of the Saint John Public Library which was the first free, tax based, library in Canada.
This building serves as a reminder of the strong will of the Saint John merchants to rebuild the city after the fire. The brick and stone architecture sent a message that the city would be more fire resistant in the future. The elements and level of design demonstrate that the city was rebuilt in grander fashion.
Source: Planning and Development Department - City of Saint John


http://saintjohnlibrary.com/about-u...history.html


Quote:
Then came Colonel James Domville, an officer commanding the 8th Princess Louise Hussars, a member of Common Council, and a Member of Parliament for Kings County. To him belongs the credit for founding the library. He thought the best way to replace the many private libraries lost in the fire was to start a public library, which would be free to all citizens of Saint John. In 1879 he prepared and distributed a circular which brought books and contributions from well-wishers everywhere, including the British and United States governments. When the books arrived, Col. Domville established a trust placing them under the control of the City. At the same time, a citizens committee made a presentation to the Council concerning the establishment of a library. As a result, the Council appointed a provisional board consisting of Mayor Charles R. Ray, Dr. James Christie, Col. Domville, Eilliam Elder, Frank Hatheway, A. Chipman Smith and James Ruel with resolutions as outlined in the Common Council Minutes of September 28, 1880. The books remained in boxes in the Market Building until the passing of an Act by the Legislature in 1883 "to provide for the establishment of a Free Public Library in the City of Saint John." This Act
allowed Common Council to assess $500.00 upon the City for the maintenance of the library. The full Act and subsequent legal documents can be read in the downloadable PDF at the left of this page.


You will find a lot of the cheques from The Maritime Bank of the Dominion of Canada made out to the Freeman's National Bank of Boston. So why are so many bank cheques from New Brunswick made out to the Freeman's National Bank of Boston?
They helped fund the bank when it was on it's last leg and note holders where directed to redeem their money with them as they closed up shop.

Cheques from this bank come from either the Woodstock, Fredericton of Saint John branch variety.

Wilfred H. Harrison wrote his MA history thesis at the University of New Brunswick: Fredericton on the Maritime bank back in 1971. It is a great resource.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
4197 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  08:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chequer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sounds like you have the makings of a couple of cool articles. Are you an RCNA member? This is why I love collecting cheques.

I don't have a Nicholson cheque catalogued, which doesn't necessarily mean I don't have one, but it doesn't sound familiar.
Edited by chequer
03/26/2016 08:19 am
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1118 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  10:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Harmonica to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I am not an R.C.N.A. member, that is next on my list actually.
I was thinking I could try to do something for Material Culture Review, a little Folklore journal from Cape Breton University but getting in the R.C.N.A. news letter would be steller. I need to get a proper computer and editing software for pictures. Heck, I don't even have a word processor, I use Google docs. .

I can get my hands on a second Nicholson cheque if you don't have one. You use a cataloque system. When I hear things like this it makes me relies how much more I have to do to be a serious numismatist.

DO you know what bank your Irving cheque was from?
Pillar of the Community
Canada
4197 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  11:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chequer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I've been lax in my cheque organization lately, so nothing's up to date and I'm not even certain where many items are (e.g. my Red Rose building cheque!). I just use an Excel spreadsheet, nothing fancy. The Irving one is drawn on the Royal Bank of Canada in Buctouche and dated 20 July 1914 - I'll get a scan sometime ... when I locate it.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1118 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  12:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Harmonica to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, I have the same problem. I think all coin guys have that problem.
I haven't read any Irving bios in a while but I believe JD had a saw mill in Boctouche and KC brought the family bizz to Saint John.

Do you happen to have a Maritime bank cheque from Saint John? I do not have one nor have I seen one. I know they exist.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
4197 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  12:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chequer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
No, I think I only have Fredericton (unless I have one somewhere that hasn't been inventoried).
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1118 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  12:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Harmonica to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have several from Woodstock if you ever want to trade.

So once you get them in mylar flips do you put them in those currency binder pages? I seen a guy keep his CTC collection like that and it looked sharp. That is ultimately what I think I am going to do. If I could I would like to do a numismatic display at the Hartland Trade Show this year and I was going to do a tokens of Carleton County theme with one of the Franklin mint's longest covered bridges mmedals in the center but I think I may show off some of my cheques. I am already known as the trade token, ancient, tea and cheque guy at my collector club.

Surely we can't be the only two on here interested in cheques? Anyone else?
Pillar of the Community
Canada
3690 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  2:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CC-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting topic.

I have several old cheques:

The Provincial Bank of Canada 1933
Government of Canada 1954
CIBC 1959
Bank of Montreal 1956
Canadian Bank of Commerce 1941 (3 cent stamp attached)
Province of Ontario Treasury Dept 1942
National Canadian Bank 1941 (2 cent stamps attached)
Bank of NS 1937 & 1939 &1933 (3 cent stamp attached) & 1931 (2 cent stamp attached)
Manufacturers Trust Company 1950
Imperial Bank of Canada 1949 (3 cent stamps attached)
Bank of Toronto 1946 & 1930

Pretty sure they are next to worthless but I like them.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
736 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  2:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Hounddog Bill to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The items shown here aren't Canadian but from a bank in a small community along the southern shores of lake Erie.
The one here I thought may be interesting because it was charged $1.25 for insufficient funds.
What makes a check collectable anyway apart from the bank?
Do you look for checks signed by certain people or are you looking for who they were made out to?
I have quite a few checks, promissory notes, receipts etc from this gentleman all are from around 1911-1913.
Some of the checks are made out to well know companies of the time. Here's a list of some.
1. Standard Oil Co. of NY.
2. Studebaker Corporation.
3. American Express Co.
4. International Harvester Co. of America.
5. John Deer Plow Co.
I also noticed one of the checks was made out for a value of only 4 cents.









Pillar of the Community
Canada
4197 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  3:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chequer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Love the NSF one. Many things make a cheque collectable - bank, location, signatures, drawers/drawee, some even put a premium on special dates ... I noticed Harmonica's Bob Newhart cheque was dated on Halloween (the autograph would be the main interest with that though).

What locations are yours CC-Ottawa?
Pillar of the Community
Canada
3690 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  3:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CC-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Most are Ottawa, some Toronto, at least one New York.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
4197 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  3:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chequer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Government of Canada '54 cheque would be cool to see.
Pillar of the Community
Canada
3690 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  4:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CC-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I blanked out the payee and their address (for their privacy) but here is the cheque.


Pillar of the Community
Canada
4197 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  4:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add chequer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I like that a lot!
Pillar of the Community
Canada
1118 Posts
 Posted 03/26/2016  11:53 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Harmonica to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Speaking of why a cheque is collectable I could tell you I like the Government of Canada cheque, but I am not sure why. Is it because it is Canadian, the vignette coat of arms? I do not know why I like that particular cheque but I do.

I am a geographical collector, anything Maritimes with a focus on NB and NS usually. Of course as I go down the rabbit hole of stamp collecting I could see myself looking to do stamp type sets on cheques.


Quote:
I have quite a few checks, promissory notes, receipts etc from this gentleman all are from around 1911-1913.


That is attractive to me but I am not sure about other cheque guys. I collect envelops from tea companies and I have a King Cole cover and a Red Rose cover made out to the same guy in NS and I enjoyed doing the research on that man. The fact that you have all those cheques from big companies all from the same guy AND they are over 100 years old is awesome. You could really paint a story with those. I would guess he was a farmer, the farm might still be in use.

The Bank of North Collins. I love the blacklettering/ fracture script. They did not have to go above a stander Times New Romans but they did. These things are ephemeral, you tossed them out. If cheques aren't amazing works of folk art then I do not know what is.
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