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Fun For History Buffs: "When This Coin Was Made..."

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 Posted 03/02/2018  04:36 am  Show Profile   Check chafemasterj's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add chafemasterj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1990 was the year of the beginning of the first Gulf War. Iraq had invaded Kuwait and the rest is history.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_Kuwait




Check out my counterstamped Lincoln Cent collection:
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 Posted 03/03/2018  12:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Seems like yesterday. My senior University year.

Nice contribution.
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 Posted 04/04/2018  12:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cross-posting:

Philip I "The Arab"
AR Antoninianus
IMP C M IVL PHILIPPVS P F AVG P M, Radiate draped bust right
PAX FVNDATA CVM PERSIS, Pax standing left, holding branch and scepter
Minted 244/245



The young Gordian III died under unclear circumstances in 244 while on a campaign against the new Sassanian emperor, Shapur I. Whether by vote of the Army or his own machinations, Philip was immediately declared emperor. A provincial citizen, he knew that he needed to leave at once to consolidate power. He reached a treaty with Shapur I on humiliating terms; he returned Armenia to Sassanian control, and paid 500,000 gold Aureii to Shapur for peace. This not only put enormous strain on an economy already on the brink of collapse, but also demoralized many within Rome, worsened when taxes were increased to resupply the imperial treasury. Philip tried to placate the populace through the minting of this coin, along with several other reassuring themes. He also spent lavishly on the Secular Games for Rome's 1000th birthday in 248. Discontent boiled over, and usurpers started coming out of the woodworks, culminating in Philip's defeat and death at the hands of his former ally, Trajan Decius.

While the Romans glossed over the events of the treaty made with the Sassanians, Shapur commissioned a monument of the event at Naqs-e Rustam:



Shapur, on horseback, holds the bound Valerian while Philip kneels in supplication. Further reading:
http://www.livius.org/pictures/iran...of-shapur-i/

A bit more background for those two or three of you who aren't well versed in 3rd century Roman politics

- Before the rise of the Sassanians, the great Persian power to the east was Parthia, which had ceased to be a major threat by the time of Augustus, and had virtually no military might by the time of the great campaigns undertaken by Lucius Verus and Septimius Severus between the 160s and 200s. Parthia was toppled from within by Ardashir, the king of a small tributary state called Persis.

- Ardashir died and was succeeded by his son Shapur in 242. The Romans failed to take him seriously, and were shocked when he was able to both successfully raid their frontiers, and halt a Roman punitive campaign against him. Many believe Gordian III was murdered with his troops, who believed the campaign's failure was due to the teenager's inadequacy.

- The peace was maintained for a time pursuant to the agreement between Shapur and Philip, but when Philip's successor Decius fell in battle against a Germanic army, Shapur renewed hostilities, determined to capture the Roman east. Decius was succeeded by Gallus, who was too incompetent to deal with Shapur and the Germans concurrently, and offered no resistance.

- Gallus was killed in 253, followed very briefly by a usurper, and then succeeded by Valerian and Gallienus. Valerian spent his entire reign on campaign against Shapur, but he was unexpectedly defeated and taken as a hostage by Shapur, who was reported to have used the former emperor as a foot stool for his own amusement.

- Shapur died in 270, and court infighting allowed Rome to recompose herself. Emperor Carus managed to launch a punitive campaign and sacked the Sassanian capital city. In the 280s, the threat of the Sassanians was a driving force behind Diocletian's tetrarchy, which would forever transform Rome's politics until its demise.

- The Sassanian and Roman (later Byzantine) empires alternated between times of uneasy peace and warfare for the next four centuries; the final emperor of the Sassanians was overthrown by the Muslims in 651, after the Muslims capitalized on a prolonged war between the Sassanians and Byzantines.
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 Posted 04/05/2018  11:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add DeputyMax to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
October 4, Sputnik is launched and the space race is on.

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I never met a half dollar I didn't like - DeputyMax
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 Posted 04/06/2018  12:34 am  Show Profile   Check spruett001's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add spruett001 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the history, Finn!

Space-related posts are some of my favorites. Thanks for sharing Dgm9999!
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 Posted 04/06/2018  6:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
October 4, Sputnik is launched and the space race is on.
Good one.
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 Posted 04/09/2018  06:56 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ron6788 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

[Hope nobody has posted this already as I didn't get to read the whole thread. Also, hope my memory serves me well as I read the story some time ago]

In 1805, the Lewis & Clark expedition was exploring the western US. At that time, it was wilderness: herds of buffalo, small animals scurrying all around, grizzly bears, and Indian villages throughout. The expedition was actually a paid army detail and the two men led a group of 30 men. Their mission was to find a route to the Pacific. They were heavily armed and well-financed, carrying silver dollars (this is from the L & C diary, but whether they were early US bust dollars or Spanish reales isn't mentioned).

A true life adventure story, the group lived off the land for two years, hunting for their food and trading with the Indians for vegetables. They traveled about 30 miles a day via the wild rivers on canoes. Sometimes, Lewis would walk on the shoreline instead. Part of his mission, besides being the leader and mapping the route, was to catalog all the new flora and fauna. How did he do that? By hand, of course. That's right, every night he would tirelessly draw pictures and make scientific descriptions of these things.

The group was gone so long that everyone, including President Jefferson (whose idea this was), thought they were dead, either from conditions or killed by Indians. In truth, Lewis did have to fight off (and kill) an Indian one night when he snuck into their camp and tried to rob them. Another time, he was chased by a grizzly- even after the bear had been shot 8 times! Lewis escaped by jumping in the river. Then, there was another time one member of his group accidentally shot him during a hunting trip. With the poor state of medicine back then, he was lucky there were no complications (I believe the bullet passed through).

They were successful in their mission and returned to Washington, DC as heroes. Lewis was given a lifetime job out west by the President. Others became politicians, some went out west and became trappers and traders.
Edited by ron6788
04/09/2018 10:14 am
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 Posted 04/09/2018  08:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Arkie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excellent job!
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 Posted 04/09/2018  09:49 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excellent post!


Quote:
whether they were early US bust dollars or Spanish reales isn't mentioned
The former. I chose to believe the former.
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 Posted 04/10/2018  2:23 pm  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great Britain 1936 silver threepence:



Employees of The Royal Mint in London celebrating New Year's Day on January 1, 1936, could hardly have imagined how their lives would change in the year ahead.

The first big upset of the year came less than three weeks later, when King George V passed away on January 20. The country had only celebrated his Silver Jubilee the year before. He was succeeded by his eldest son, King Edward VIII.

Although a few colonial coins with central holes were issued for Fiji, New Guinea and East and West Africa in the name of King Edward VIII, there were no plans to mint any British coins bearing his portrait until after his coronation in 1937. However, The Royal Mint got to work on a series of patterns, including a 12-sided nickel brass threepence, intended to replace the coin illustrated above. As far as circulating coinage went, 1936 was a very high mintage year for all denominations, except for the Wreath crown, with a mintage of 2,473. (The highest mintage of any Wreath crown was only 15,030 in 1927).

Great Britain participated in the Olympic Games in Berlin in August, and won four gold, seven silver and three bronze medals. However, the Olympics were seen by many as a work of propaganda by Adolf Hitler designed to promote the Nazi ideas of racism and anti-Semitism, and some commentators looked ahead to the possibility of another Global conflict.

Meanwhile, Edward VIII's love affair with American divorcee Wallis Simpson was causing ripples both at court and among the general population. When it became clear that Mrs Simpson would not be accepted as a Queen, Edward abdicated in favour of his younger brother Albert, who took the throne as King George VI on December 11.

However, perhaps the event of 1936 in Great Britain that would have the most far-reaching consequences worldwide took place on November 2 on a hill in North London!

Alexandra Palace, on Muswell Hill, was never a royal residence. It opened in 1873 as an entertainment and exhibition centre, but never really lived up to the expectations of its promoters. By the 1930s much of the building was closed and derelict. The local council who owned this white elephant were delighted when a group of engineers from the fledgling British Broadcasting Corporation asked if they could rent part of the palace to create something called 'Television'.

Locals soon called this bizarre tribe of mostly young, male and university-educated people "the fools on the hill" as they built a large antenna on top of the palace and started experimenting with two different systems - a mechanical one devised by Scotsman John Logie Baird (soon abandoned) and an electronic one designed by Marconi EMI.





On November 2 the world's first high-definition TV broadcasts were made from this building, and the world has never been quite the same ever since.
Edited by NumisRob
04/10/2018 2:27 pm
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 Posted 04/11/2018  7:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ron6788 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1918-9 Spanish Flu

Don't blame Spain for this one, the virus is actually believed to have originated in China. It took its name from the fact that Spain had the most complete news coverage about it. Other nations had news blackouts as part of national security from WWI, which was just wrapping up.

The scourge of the Spanish Flu killed 50 million people worldwide, including more than 1/2 a million here in the US. At that time, there was no medicine for the flu. Authorities didn't even know it was a virus. They did know it was highly contagious, though, and many precautions were taken, such as ordering different operating times for businesses in NYC so there'd be less people on the subway at one time.

So many people were dying so fast that morticians were overwhelmed. There are stories of families having to dig graves for their own relatives. Even President Wilson got the flu, although he didn't die. But many young men, lucky enough to have survived WWI, came back only to soon perish from deadly bronchial complications of the flu.

The flu began in earnest in the Spring of 1918, exactly 100 years ago this season. It killed more people worldwide than any other pandemic, including the Bubonic Plague of the Middle Ages.
So, you think you'll be ok with today's modern medicine? Well, yes and no. Yes, it's unlikely the flu will kill you but, no, it can still make you very sick with a fever and muscle aches so bad you can't stand.
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 Posted 04/12/2018  10:07 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good and bad all rolled up into one post!

Nice cent though.
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 Posted 04/12/2018  10:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice entries! Two of my great-great grandparents died during the 1918 flu pandemic

I'm glad to see this thread get a breath of life again
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 Posted 04/15/2018  12:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ron6788 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I like this thread because it has me researching stuff I normally wouldn't and learning or relearning some important and interesting facts.

American Civil War, 1861-65


painting, Hancock at Gettysburg, by Thure de Thulstrup

The Civil War was started by the South when they open-fired on Fort Sumter. It kicked off four years of bloody fighting with the North suffering more casualties. One of the costliest battles, in terms of loss of life, as well as the Confederacy's chances of winning, was at Gettysburg, PA. Total losses were 51,000 over 3 days. It was at the site of this grave battle that President Lincoln made his famous Gettysburg Address.

I had always thought this speech took place after the war but it was actually during the middle of the war, when there was still some doubt about who would win. Short, but eloquent, Lincoln rallied the country in believing there was a higher purpose to the Union prevailing. That was to preserve the founding fathers idea of a nation where everyone would be equal.

But the idea of secession from the Union is not unique to the 19th century. Just last year, Californians were polled on their preference for declaring their state a separate country- with 32% in favor! [Berkeley IGS Poll, 3-28-17].
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