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Post Your Coins With Stars

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 Posted 03/14/2021  1:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add IndianGoldEagle to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1914-S Saint Gaudens $20 double eagle


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 Posted 03/15/2021  01:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
2016 American Silver Eagle.


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 Posted 03/15/2021  09:49 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1935 Connecticut Tercentenary half dollar was issued "in commemoration of the three-hundredth anniversary of the founding of the Colony of Connecticut." (Public Law 73-446) The coin was designed by Henry Kreiss.

The obverse of the coin presents the famed "Charter Oak," the hiding place for the colony's Royal Charter when an attempt was made by King James II (through his local administrator Sir Edmund Andros) to revoke it.

The reverse features a standing eagle with 13 small stars (representing the original 13 colonies, of which Connecticut was one) above it, just under "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" near the rim of the upper half of the coin.

1935 Connecticut Tercentenary Half Dollar





For other of my posts about the Connecticut half dollar, see:

- 1935 Connecticut Tercentenary
- 1935 Connecticut Tercentenary - Ephemera
- 1935 Connecticut Tercentenary - Ephemera II
- 1935 Connecticut Tercentenary - Philatelic Tie-In

Other of my posts on commemorative coins and medals can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 03/16/2021  09:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1892-93 commemorative half dollars for the World's Columbian Exposition make minor use of stars in their designs. As with several other coins of the commemorative series, the stars are used simply as separators. What makes the stars different on this coin, however, is the fact they are six-pointed stars vs. the much more commonly-used five-pointed stars seen on other commemorative coins.

On the obverse, the stars separate "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" at the top rim from "COLUMBIAN HALF DOLLAR" at the bottom; the stars are located at approximately the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock positions.

Within the reverse design, the stars are used to separate "1892" (or "1893") at the bottom rim from "WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION CHICAGO" which encircles the ship at the rim above. The stars are located at approximately the 5:30 and 6:30 clock positions.

The coin's obverse features a right-facing portrait of Christopher Columbus; it was designed/modeled by Charles Barber. The reverse depicts Columbus' flagship on his First Voyage, the Santa Maria; it was designed/modeled by George Morgan.

The use of six-pointed stars on the Columbian half dollar is therefore not much of a surprise as Barber's designs for the dime, quarter and half dollar (1892-1915) make use of six-pointed stars, and Morgan's namesake silver dollar (1878-1904, 1921) does the same. Six-pointed stars were the norm for coin designers on 18th and 19th century US coins; the changeover to the regular use of five-pointed stars occurred in the 20th century.

1892 World's Columbian Exposition Half Dollar





You can read my previous posts here:

- 1892 Columbian Half Dollar
- Columbian Half Dollar Cousins
- 1892 Columbian Half Dollar - Metallic "Ephemera"
- 1892 Columbian Half Dollar - Special Day Badges
- Columbian Half Dollar - Quick Bits

Other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 03/16/2021  9:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1960 Republica de Cuba.
5 centavos.


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 Posted 03/17/2021  06:50 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1900 Lafayette Memorial dollar is another classic era US commemorative coin on which stars are used in a supporting vs. a starring role. (Sorry! I couldn't resist!)

The Lafayette Dollar includes two stars on its obverse side and three on its reverse. On each sides, the stars are used to separate the coin's inscriptions and do not carry any special significance or meaning. The design is the work of Charles Barber; he used five-pointed stars on the Lafayette vs. the six-pointed stars he used eight years earlier on the Columbian half dollar. (See my post above.)

The words included in each inscription phrase on the coin are separated from each other with a space filled with a dot (shown as hyphens here); the phrases are separated from one another via stars. On the obverse, "UNITED-STATES-OF-AMERICA" is separated from "LAFAYETTE-DOLLAR" via stars that flank the denomination. On the coin's reverse, "ERECTED-BY-THE-YOUTH-OF-THE-UNITED-STATES-IN-HONOR-OF-GEN-LAFAYETTE" extends CCW at the rim from the 7 o'clock position around to the 5 o'clock position, and is separated from the one-word inscription "PARIS" and the date "1900" at the coin's bottom by stars that flank and split the two short inscriptions. (Note: Per the US Mint, the "1900" is not the coin's date, but rather the date of the Paris Exposition. Technically, the coin does not feature a date - the coins were struck in December 1899.)

The Lafayette Dollar was the first classic US commemorative coin to feature five-pointed stars. Every classic-era commemorative coin that followed it also used five-pointed stars.

1900 Lafayette Memorial Dollar





You can read more about the Lafayette Dollar here:

- 1900 Lafayette Memorial Dollar
- 1900 Lafayette Memorial Dollar - Revisited
- Yorktown Medal vs. Lafayette Dollar
-1900 Lafayette Memorial Dollar - Coins with Hats Thread

Other of my stories about commemorative coins and medals can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 03/17/2021  11:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The 1900 Lafayette Memorial dollar is another classic era US commemorative coin on which stars are used in a supporting vs. a starring role. (Sorry! I couldn't resist!)
Well played!

Nice example!

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 Posted 03/18/2021  07:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Columbia, SC Sesquicentennial commemorative half dollar has fit into multiple of the "Post Your..." threads here on CCF. I've previously written about the buildings seen on the obverse of the coin in the "Places" thread (Read it here.) and of how Justice, the central figure on the obverse, is depicted holding a balance scale and sword in the "Hands" thread (Read it here.).

In this post, I turn my attention to the reverse of the coin and the 13 five-pointed stars seen within the central area of the design. Unlike many of the commemorative coins I've posted about recently, the stars on the Columbia Sesquicentennial half dollar do carry meaning and are not simply used as inscription separators. The 13 stars are symbolic of South Carolina being among the original 13 colonies; they encircle the Palmetto tree at the center of the reverse's design, starting at about the 7:30 clock position and extending around to the 4:30 position.

A quick note about the Palmetto tree seen on the reverse: logs from the tree were used in the construction of a fort on Sullivan's Island in South Carolina; the fort was built to protect Charleston, SC. On June 28, 1776, a group of nine British Navy ships, under the command of Commodore Sir Peter Parker, attacked the fort . The attack lasted approximately nine hours, but the Palmetto logs withstood the cannon-fire barrage and the fort held - Charleston was saved! After the successful battle, the fort was named after its commander, Colonel William Moultrie. The Palmetto tree, and its strength, soon became a popular symbol of South Carolina and has remained such through to the present day.

1936 Columbia, SC Sesquicentennial Half Dollar





You can read more details about the Columbia, SC half dollar, its original holder and various related ephemera by checking out:

- 1936 Columbia, SC
- 1936 Columbia, SC - Ephemera
- 1936 Columbia, SC - Ephemera #2
- 1936 Columbia, SC - "Cousin"

More of my posts about commemorative coins and medals can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
03/18/2021 09:34 am
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 Posted 03/18/2021  09:39 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1862 Belgium 5 centimes:
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 Posted 03/18/2021  11:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excellent!


Quote:
A quick note about the Palmetto tree seen on the reverse: logs from the tree were used in the construction of a fort on Sullivan's Island in South Carolina...
Fort Moultrie is a great place to visit and explore if you get the chance.
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 Posted 03/18/2021  10:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1983 Pakistan,
25 Paisa


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 Posted 03/19/2021  09:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1936 commemorative half dollar marking the centennial of the founding of the city of Elgin, IL is host to the lonliest star in the classic US commemorative coin series - just a single star is presented on the coin! The half dollar was designed by Trygve Rovelstad.

The star is located on the coin's obverse and separates the dates "1673" and "1936" at the 6 o'clock position. To my knowledge, the single star has no symbolic meaning - it's just another ornamental separator!

The two dates on the coin are a bit at odds with the legislated primary purpose of the coin - the 100th anniversary of Elgin's founding. The city marked its centennial anniversary in 1935 vs. 1936 and the 1673 date - a reference to the year Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet began their exploration of the Mississippi River in search of its mouth - has no genuine connection to the present-day city or its precursors.

In fairness, the bill proposing the Elgin half dollar was introduced in the House of Representatives in May 1935; at which time it was referred to the House Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures. It was not reported out by the Committee, however, until February 1936 - well past Elgin's centennial anniversary date.

Such anniversary issues aside, the coin had a secondary objective of helping to support the completion of the Pioneer Memorial statue so that it could be presented to Elgin. The coin's reverse depicts the full statue, while its obverse presents the head of the leftmost pioneer in the statue's grouping. (More about the statue and its long-overdue erection in Elgin can be found here: 1936 Elgin, IL Centennial - Coins Depicting Beards Thread.)

1936 Elgin, IL Centennial Half Dollar





Pioneer Memorial Statue in Elgin, IL

Image credit: Pioneer Monuments in the American West web site. Visit them here Pioneer Monuments in the American West for a great overview of American pioneer memorials.


You can learn more about the Elgin coin here: 1936 City of Elgin, IL and here: 1936 Elgin - Revisited.

More of my posts about commemorative pieces can be found here: Read More: Commems Collection



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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