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Post Your Coins With Stars

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 Posted 12/02/2021  2:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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I have never cared much for the obverse here, but I have always liked that reverse.

I agree. The obverse is rather generic and seems like the obligatory "match scene." The reverse, OTOH, is a more effective design, IMO, and conveys a sense of importance and permanence that is absent on the obverse.



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 Posted 12/03/2021  09:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1994 Prisoner of War commemorative silver dollar is one of three silver dollars authorized by Public Law 103-186 as part of the United States Veterans Commemorative Coins program. (I'll cover the others in follow-up posts.) It is another US commemorative coin that features stars that are a bit subtle.

The coin's obverse design depicts an American Bald Eagle that has broken the chains that were holding it and flying through a ring of barbed wire (each symbolic of escaping the tools used to secure prisoners). The design was created by Thomas "Tom" Mason Nielson, an artist/painter who focused on marine and landscape paintings during much of his career. Neilsen's design was modeled for coinage by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Alfred Maletsky.

The reverse design presents the then-proposed design of the National Prisoner of War Museum in Andersonville, Georgia; the Museum was completed and opened in 1998 - its final design was faithful to the proposed design. The Museum honors American POWs from all wars, even though Andersonville is most closely associated with the Civil War. In front of the Museum is seen a flag pole that is flying a US Flag; the stars within Old Glory's field are easily seen (though they are not fully star-shaped). US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Edgar Z. Steever IV was responsible for the design and its modeling.

National Prisoner of War Museum - Andersonville, GA

(image Credit: National Park Service - Andersonville web site. Public Domain.


1994 Prisoner of War Silver Dollar




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 Posted 12/03/2021  5:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The 1994 Vietnam Veteran Silver Dollar was part included in Public Law 103-186 as part of the United States Veterans Commemorative Coins program. The three-coin US Veterans commemorative program consisted of three silver dollars - Vietnam Veterans, Prisoner of War and Women in Military Service for America.

The Vietnam Veteran's obverse design presents a close-up view of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall along with an outstretched hand that is searching for the name of a veteran who gave his/her life in the Vietnam War. Though multiple names are clearly visible in the depiction, no specific name is identified as the soldier being searched for. The Washington Monument is seen in the background.

The coin's design and its modeling were done by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver John Mercanti; his "JM" initials are seen near the rim at about the 3:30 clock position.

The coin's reverse design depicts three Armed Forces medals awarded for service during the Vietnam War (l to r, Armed Forces Expeditionary Service (AFES), Vietnam War Service (replaced the AFES medal in 1965) and Republic of Vietnam Campaign); the coin was designed/modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Thomas D. Rogers, Sr. It is among the medals that is found the coin's star.

It might appear that the leftmost award medal includes a star, as multiple points are visible (especially to the left of the eagle) but the eight-pointed design element is actually a compass rose.

The coin's star is found on the medal at the right, the Vietnam Campaign medal. The hanging medal features a six-pointed white enamel star (the white is meant to represent purity) superimposed over a gold hexagon of rays with individual rays visible between the star's points. At the center of the star is a green circle (representing freedom) within which is a map of Vietnam; a red flame is included in the central region of the map, it was included to indicate the areas of active fighting. (Note: All color references are to the actual hanging medal; no Mint-produced version of the coin is colorized.)

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal


I purchased the Uncirculated versions of the three coins in the Veterans program via a three-piece set vs. individually.

1994 Vietnam Veterans Memorial Silver Dollar




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 Posted 12/04/2021  10:51 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The third of three 1994 US Veterans Commemorative Coins is the Women in Military Service Silver Dollar. (See my posts above for brief discussions of the other two coins in the program: 1994 Prisoner of War Silver Dollar and 1994 Vietnam Veterans Memorial Silver Dollar.)

The stars for this coin are seen on the coin's obverse; they are used as separators to differentiate the names of the circa 1994 branches of the US military: Army, Marines, Navy, Air Forces and Coast Guard. (Today, there is a sixth service branch: the Space Force.) The branch names encircle the central design, beginning at about the 7 o'clock position with "ARMY" and extending around to about the 5 o'clock position, completing the list with "COAST GUARD."

The central devices of the design are the conjoined portraits of five servicewomen, one for each branch of the military. To prevent any type of unintended significance/prioritization being assigned to the ordering of the portraits, they all are presented wearing the same uniform jacket and without any distinguishing insignia. The approach used suggests an equal standing among the branches. US Mint Sculptor-Engraver T. James Ferrell is the designer/modeler.

The coin's reverse design reflects an old-and-new theme. It presents a portion of the Women in Military Service for America Memorial - the Hemicycle - found in Arlington, Virginia. The "old" aspect of the design comes in via the facade itself which was dedicated in 1932 as the ceremonial entrance to the Arlington National Cemetery. The structure was never fully completed, however, and had been left in such a state until being purchased by the Women In Military Service For America Memorial Foundation (WIMSA) in 1986.

Original Hemicycle at Arlington National Cemetery

(Image Credit: Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs DIvision. Historic American Engineering Record. Public domain.

The structure was updated, expanded and renovated to create appropriate gallery/exhibit hall space and opened as the Women in Military Service for America Memorial in 1997; it was rebranded as the Military Women's Memorial in 2019. The design and modeling of the coin's reverse was handled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Thomas D. Rogers, Sr.

From the Memorial's web site:

The Military Women's Memorial is the only historical repository documenting all military women's service. It is located at the ceremonial entrance to Arlington National Cemetery and features an education center, interactive exhibitions, a world-class collection of military women stories, and engaging programs and events for all generations.


1994 Women in Military Service Silver Dollar




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 Posted 12/04/2021  5:52 pm  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great coin and interesting story, commems!

1976 France 50 francs - a star after 'FRANCAISE' and another on the edge!

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 Posted 12/04/2021  9:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1963 Republica de Colombia.
20 centavos.

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 Posted 12/05/2021  09:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The US commemorative coin program in support of the 1996 Atlanta Olympics Centennial Games issued coins in three denominations: half dollar, one dollar and five dollars. Each year, the coins of each denomination shared a common reverse - all of them include stars as a result of the official Atlanta Games logo being included within each design.

The half dollar coins were copper-nickel (CuNi) clad coins, the same composition as the regular, circulating US half dollar coin. Baseball and Basketball were the themes for the two obverse designs produced.

The shared reverse design, the work of US Mint Sculptor-Engraver T. James Ferrell, features a globe map showing North and South America, Europe and Africa. The map is meant to represent the 197 nations that participated in the 1996 Games. The official logo of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games is overlaid on the map in the Atlantic Ocean area between the Americas and Europe/Africa; the logo gives the two half dollars their stars. The logo features one "perfect" star at its top plus three other stars in progressive stages of transformation between flame and star.

Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games Logo


From https://www.olympics.com/en/olympic.../logo-design, the logo/emblem is described as follows:

"The base of the torch mark logo, made of the five Rings and the number 100, resembles a classical Greek column and recognizes the centennial of the Games. The torch mark's flames gradually evolve into a perfect star symbolizing each athlete's pursuit of excellence."

Presented here is the 1995 Baseball Half Dollar. The coin's obverse depicts a scene at home plate, with a batter, the catcher and the home plate umpire all in position and waiting for the pitch. Edgar Zell Steevers IV, an in-house US Mint Sculptor-Engraver, designed and modeled the obverse.


1995 Atlanta Olympics Baseball Clad Half Dollar - Common Reverse Design





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 Posted 12/05/2021  3:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The US commemorative coin program for the Atlanta Olympics released multiple CuNi clad, silver and gold coins in 1995 and 1996. As I've mentioned in previous posts, each denomination, in each year, features a distinct shared design.

The reverse of the 1995 silver dollars feature an outline illustration of two clasped hands with the lower arms seen; each is shown grasping the other's wrist, with the Atlanta Committee for the Games of the XXVI Olympiad (ACOG) logo presented above them. The clasped hands are meant to be symbolic of the bond among Olympic athletes and the team spirit they exhibit. It is the ACOG logo that incorporates stars into the coin's designs. The design was created by outside artist William Krawczewics and was modeled for coinage by T. James Ferrell, a US Mint Sculptor-Engraver.

(See the post above regarding the 1995 Atlanta Olympics half dollar for a color image of, and the official description for, the ACOG logo.)

The Atlanta program included four 1995 silver dollars: Gymnastics, Track and Field, Cycling and the Paralympic Games. To illustrate the shared reverse design of the silver dollars, I present the 1995 Cycling Silver Dollar.

The coin's obverse design was created and modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver John Mercanti. Based on the style of the bicycles depicted and the helmets worn by the cyclists, it is safe to say the scene depicts cyclists in a road race (vs. a Track Cycling or Mountain Biking event, the other cycling categories at the Atlanta Games).


1995 Atlanta Olympics Cycling Silver Dollar




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 Posted 12/06/2021  07:48 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The US Mint followed the 1995 Baseball and Basketball half dollars with 1996 issues that featured themes of Swimming and Women's Soccer. The 1996 Atlanta Games were the first ever to include Women's Soccer as a medal event. (The US team beat China 2-1 in the Gold Medal match.)

The US commemorative coin program struck in support of the 1996 Atlanta Olympics Centennial Games issued coins in three denominations: half dollar, one dollar and five dollars. Each year, the coins of each denomination shared a common reverse - as all of the designs included the the official Atlanta Games logo, they all include stars within their design.

The program's half dollar coins were copper-nickel (CuNi) clad coins, and struck on planchets that were of the same composition as those used for the regular, circulating US half dollar coin.

The 1996 pair's shared reverse design, the work of outside artist Malcolm Farley, with modeling by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Thomas D. Rogers, Sr., is dominated by the "torch and stars" logo of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). (See previous posts for an image and discussion of the logo's design.) The logo features one "perfect" star at its top plus three other stars in progressive stages of transformation between flame and star.

The coin's obverse design was created by freelance artist Clint Hansen, it depicts two women soccer players battling for the ball during a match. (You can learn more about Hansen at his web site: https://www.ClintHansen.com.) The design was modeled for coinage by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver William Cousins.


1996 Atlanta Olympics Women's Soccer Clad Half Dollar - Common Reverse Design




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 Posted 12/06/2021  10:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you're looking for a discussion of the shared reverse of the 1996 Atlanta Olympics Silver Dollar, you will find it here:

- 1996 Atlanta Olympics High Jump Silver Dollar



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 Posted 12/06/2021  11:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
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 Posted 12/07/2021  06:11 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The commemorative coin program for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics includes four gold half eagle coins, two issued in 1995 and two in 1996. Within each year, the coins share a distinct reverse design that creates their clear link to the Atlanta Games. The two 1996 gold half eagle design types are referred to as the Cauldron and the Flag Bearer.

The Cauldron Gold Half Eagle includes stars only on its reverse, while the Flag Bearer Gold Half Eagle features stars on both of its sides. The two coins feature the same reverse design which has the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) official logo as its center device; the logo is flanked by olive branches that curve around it.

The shared reverse design was created by William Krawczewicz; US Mint Sculptor-Engraver Thomas D. Rogers, Sr. modeled the design for coinage.

A color image of the logo, along with its official description can be found above in my previous posts about the Atlanta Games. (Link below.)

The obverse design of the Cauldron Half Eagle depicts the lighting of the Olympic Flame in the Atlanta Olympic Stadium cauldron at the start of the Games. The design was created by former US Mint Chief Engraver Frank Gasparro and modeled by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver T. James Ferrell.

The Flag Bearer Half Eagle's obverse design was the work of freelance artist Patricia L. Verani; it was modeled for coinage by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver John Mercanti. The design presents the flag bearer of the US Olympic team leading the US team into Olympic Stadium. The stars of the US Flag are easily seen in the depiction.

1996 Atlanta Olympics - Cauldron - Gold Half Eagle


1996 Atlanta Olympics - Flag Bearer - Gold Half Eagle



For more information, check out:

- 1996 Atlanta Olympics - Logo Discussion
- 1995-96 Atlanta Olympics Coin Program - 1995 Gold Half Eagles



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 Posted 12/07/2021  08:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dorado to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1909 E Kingdom of Saxony (Albertinian Line) (German states)
3 Mark - Friedrich August III
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