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Bilateral Collar Crack On A 1969-S Lincoln Cent?

 
 
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 Posted 10/14/2019  02:48 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Kojack to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hey guys and gals! I'm new here and id love to get some knowledge dropped on me here! I was excited to find a 69S Lincoln today. As I was impatiently searching for a D.D. I noticed that the thickness (due to the collar/rim) was very thick for 80% and then a small portion MUCH less so.
I immediately focused on the collar and I think its due to a bilateral collar crack? ALSO, after cleaning her up with a little water, I notice she has a BEAUTIFUL rainbow toning going on... is that just natural or could it be an experimental planchet? Any ideas?

(1 picture showing the 69s stacked atop a 68 to show dramatic thickness and close up of bilat collar?)



Edited by Kojack
10/14/2019 03:08 am
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 Posted 10/14/2019  06:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Do have a roll of cents in a clear plastic tube of solid copper planchet coins? Take a look at the edges of the coins. You will note that many of these cents look like your coin. As you turn the tube vertically, you will see this on the solid copper cents. The strike is different because the profiles are different. These have a higher bust design. It is call a 'high profile'. The single squeeze cents have a 'low profile'. That means the design of the bust is lower. You will note on these cents that these coins don't show this as often.

On your coin you will note that double rim near the edge of the coin. These are formed by a tilted die issue. With the die at a slight tilt, it will make the rim lower on one area, and higher on another area. The lower area because of the tilt will allow the metal to escape between the die and the collar creating a fin. Most of the time this fin is not wide and is often flattened during the rolling process. Just like on your coin.




So when these fins are flattened, they are no longer collectibles. This all happens on a single strike. So your coin is struck with normal dies, but during the strike there occurred a slight tilt of the die allowing a fin to develop, that was later flattened.



Not a mint error, but common. Hope this helps.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Edited by coop
10/14/2019 2:46 pm
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 Posted 10/14/2019  10:29 am  Show Profile   Check Errers and Varietys's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Errers and Varietys to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Agreed with Coop. The toning is from Environmental exposurex not an error.
More information about Die Deterioration? http://goccf.com/t/317950
Retired U.S. Mint Coin Die Set information. http://goccf.com/t/302961
Machine Doubling Tutorial. http://goccf.com/t/332421
Die states progression on coins. Scroll down, so you can see the different die state progressions. http://goccf.com/t/325638
Die Deterioration Doubling Tutorial. http://goccf.com/t/336470
Split Plate Doubling Tutorial. http://goccf.com/t/357614
2000 P LMC With Retained Struck Through error. http://goccf.com/t/357080
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 Posted 10/14/2019  4:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kojack to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks soo much!! Now, not all of the fin has been flattened its semi sharp and raised on 40% of its radius, so hopefully its still semi-collectible since its on a 69-s Toned #128525;

Thank you guys for such a quick response and all the new knowledge ive gained today!!
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 Posted 10/14/2019  8:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Note the thinnest on my images. That is what collectors are looking for. Ones like yours has been flattened are easy to find. Save it for now, until you find a better one.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 10/15/2019  1:53 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another way to know it isn't a cracked collar is: on a cracked die the result is a raised line on the struck coin. A collar crack will show a raised line on the edge of the coin. The edge of this coin is flat and smooth. Likewise a die break causes a raised area on the face of the coin, and a collar break results in a raised lump on the edge of the coin. Now if the bottom edge of the collar breaks the lump on the coin edge will show evidence of having been sheared off during the ejection of the coin and may showa raise lump at the junction of the edge and rim.
Gary Schmidt
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 Posted 10/15/2019  2:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Panther to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
How exactly does the die become tilted in the first place. That would mean many of those coins were probably struck. Is there ever a time when it's the planchet that is tilted ?

Dan
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