Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Meaning Of German Term?

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 12 / Views: 752Next Topic  
New Member

United States
2 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2020  08:39 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add rbo50 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
In a German-language book on ancient Greek coins the author refers to the classic tools used by ancient stone cutters and stamp cutters (for coin dies). He lists the burin (Stichel), drill (Bohrer), and the Rundperl. I can find nothing about the Rundperl. Can anyone tell me what this tool is in English?
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
1290 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2020  09:10 am  Show Profile   Check MetDet71's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add MetDet71 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Not 100 percent on this but Rundperlen means round pearl, if that helps at all.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1990 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2020  09:18 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nfine to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Internet German translator returned "Circular Perch"
Valued Member
United States
293 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2020  09:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bzookaj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Likely "round bead."
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
23033 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2020  09:52 am  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the community
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
3484 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2020  10:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Likely "round bead."


I think since many ancient and medieval coins have a beaded circle or other similar device, I think this makes a lot a sense, i.e. it is a punch that makes a hemispherical impression.
Valued Member
United Kingdom
266 Posts
 Posted 01/17/2020  11:49 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I think it refers to a small drilling/milling ball head bit, similar to this modern one.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
87578 Posts
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
17074 Posts
 Posted 01/18/2020  02:24 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
My first love is ancient coins.
I assume that the writer is referring to the cutting of dies for ancient coins.
Such a tool would NOT be made out of a modern hardened high speed tool steel ferro alloy.

Nevertheless, the picture has given me a clue.
I am thinking that
a 'rundperl' could be a ball headed punch
to help with the intaglio die cutting. The result would be a dot or a small dome on the coin.

The direct translation for 'rundperl' is roundperl

Edited by sel_69l
01/18/2020 02:29 am
Valued Member
United Kingdom
266 Posts
 Posted 01/18/2020  09:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As the OP mentioned the burin or Stichel (hand cutting tool) and the drill or Bohrer, with the Rundperl (drilling tools), the attached image was solely to show what a round ended drill bit, or burr may have looked like. It is actually a modern carbide ball nosed burr. A punch on the other hand is usually associated with a hammer.

If anyone else thinks I was inferring that Romans had such sophisticated drill bits, or burrs, then I apologise unreservedly.
Pillar of the Community
United States
4969 Posts
 Posted 01/18/2020  10:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Don't know if these guys, from among my tools for working on metal etching and drypoint plates, would qualify as "rundperls" - but they do have spherical heads. I don't use them as punches, however. I've mostly used them for burnishing in tight areas.

Edited by Bob L
01/18/2020 10:10 am
Valued Member
United Kingdom
266 Posts
 Posted 01/18/2020  12:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
They could well be, Bob. Hand tools have not changed much over the centuries. Ones with serrated edges would be cutting or shaping tools, and the smooth ones would indeed be polishing or finishing tools.

I see that you look after your tools, and they will give you good service for many years. Wooden handled tools should never be hit with a hammer.

Jim
New Member
United States
2 Posts
 Posted 01/18/2020  11:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add rbo50 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks to all who weighed in on my question. I have a better idea now of what the author was likely referring to.
  Previous TopicReplies: 12 / Views: 752Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.67 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05