Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

New Jersey State Copper Counter Stamp?

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 9 / Views: 773Next Topic  
New Member

United States
7 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2020  12:18 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add 2TriPs to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hello so this coin was found metal detecting. It's a New Jersey state copper. It has a odd counter stamp as well as being crimped. Any clue as to who stamped it and why as well as when.

My personal theory is it was stamped as verification of authenticity then crimped because it was cashed in as to be melted down because of the copper shortage. But I really don't know.


Moderator
Learn More...
United States
86236 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2020  11:19 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the Community!

Your reply was split into its own topic and moved to the appropriate forum for the proper attention.
Valued Member
United States
457 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2020  4:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lcutler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't know if it is a recognized counterstamp. but I found a Connecticut copper with one similar. Your theory doesn't sound plausible though, copper coins just weren't looked at that closely like silver coins were for authenticity. And by the end of the 1780's there was actually a huge glut of copper coins, not a shortage.
Pillar of the Community
United States
3672 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2020  8:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ExoGuy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the CCF!

Aside from concurring with Icutler's comment on theory, I'm unable to offer any insight on this stamp.
New Member
United States
7 Posts
 Posted 02/26/2020  10:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 2TriPs to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@lcutler
Yes I know copper coins were not looked at like silver. Also yes there were a lot of copper coins. That's not what I was talking about here.

At some point the New Jersey state copper became worthless. You were able to trade that coin for an equivalent coin before the end date of the Jersey coin.
Now when we look at this coin there is a obvious counter stamp on it. We all know why coins counterstamped. Even though it's not a silver coin and copper coins were not looked at his heavily as silver coins. that is besides the point because there counter stamp on this coin. when checking the authenticity of a coin usually the counter stamps were quite detailed making them easily identifiable. If you look at this coin it's counter stamp is simply. Easly made with little effort. The clip on the coin could possibly be part of the verification process because there were a lot of fakes go around. Men with money keep meticulous records. These men will also need a way to identify money that has already been exchanged.

Now I don't see where my theory is so far-fetched. But it's only a theory and comes second to the original question. Can anyone identify this mark?
Valued Member
United States
457 Posts
 Posted 02/27/2020  04:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lcutler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
You state "We all know why coins counterstamped" I am not sure what you mean by this, there were many reasons they were counterstamped. Many for advertising purposes, as love tokens, someone's initials as a carry piece, as a memento of an important occasion, some kid with a punch, the list goes on and on. Some of the advertising ones can be identified, but most fall into the someone with a punch category. Good luck on your search.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
8642 Posts
 Posted 02/27/2020  8:20 pm  Show Profile   Check paralyse's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add paralyse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I, too, have seen a few oddball colonials with a rosette or flower type punch, as well a couple of early large cents, but have never seen nor heard any explanation as to what the marks were punched for, nor who might have done so.
Member ANA - EAC - TNA - SSDC
Specializing in 1932-1964 Washington quarters

"Most of the things worth doing in the world had been declared impossible before they were done." -- Louis D. Brandeis
New Member
United States
7 Posts
 Posted 03/06/2020  7:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 2TriPs to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@paralyse do you know of any who's the true regarding the exchange of the colonial coppers for the new money that the government was using? I'm wondering if we might find some answers there regards to the stamp.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
8642 Posts
 Posted 03/06/2020  8:42 pm  Show Profile   Check paralyse's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add paralyse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Colonials are far from my area of expertise. I know only the basics. That would be a great question to ask C4 (the colonial club) members -- they would be much more knowledgeable than I.
Member ANA - EAC - TNA - SSDC
Specializing in 1932-1964 Washington quarters

"Most of the things worth doing in the world had been declared impossible before they were done." -- Louis D. Brandeis
Valued Member
United States
457 Posts
 Posted 03/07/2020  05:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lcutler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The simple answer to that one is, there was no exchange of colonial coppers for new money. In the early days the mint did accept old foreign silver coins to be minted into new US silver coinage. When the new small Flying Eagle cents came out, old large cents were accepted in exchange for the new coins. The Federal government never recognized any of the old coppers as legal tender so there was no exchange of old colonial copers for new coins. In fact many of the obsolete colonial coins found thee way into more utilitarian usage, buttons, kid's toys, even small clock gears.
Edited by lcutler
03/07/2020 05:34 am
  Previous TopicReplies: 9 / Views: 773Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.56 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05