Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Identifying Ancient Greek Coins #9

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 2 / Views: 113Next Topic  
Valued Member
Cyprus
85 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2020  1:40 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add micha to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hello, I'm trying to identify some coins and any idea is very welcome.
Thank you for your help!

1. Diameter 18mm, Weight 6.2gr , Sicily?



2. Diameter 13mm, Weight 1.5gr , Seleukid Antiochos III ?
(can't read any letters)

Pillar of the Community
United States
5201 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2020  6:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
1. Diameter 18mm, Weight 6.2gr , Sicily?


I would lean toward Mysia. If the obverse head is female (as it appears to me), then perhaps from Lampsakos, 4th-3rd century BC. If male, then perhaps from Adramytion, 4th century BC. Mysia either way.


Quote:
2. Diameter 13mm, Weight 1.5gr , Seleukid Antiochos III ?


That would be my guess too.
Valued Member
Cyprus
85 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2020  7:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micha to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Bob, after searching for some time and studying the coin and the symbol below, the sakkos on female's head etc I'm standing to your first choice.
Mysia Lampsakos. Dolphin below. About the female, after reading some more (dying to learn), that female probably is Aphrodite!!
Aphrodite is part of the history of Lampsakos and she is wearing a sakkos in many other cities coins.
Also some history/mythology:
"The ancient Greeks widely believed that Priapus had been born in the city of Lampsacus on the Hellespont. Here sacrifices of donkeys were made in his honor, probably because of the sexual prowess that the Greeks attributed to this animal. The people of Lampsacus revered Priapus more than any other god and identified him as a son of Dionysus and Aphrodite.[2] By the end of the third century B.C.E., Priapus' image was found on coins in this region.[3]"
I wonder how they missed that detail when the archeologist identify the Lampsakos coins.
Thank you Bob!
  Previous TopicReplies: 2 / Views: 113Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.



Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Forums
It took 3.84 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05