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Is This Chinese Cash Coin?

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 6 / Views: 318Next Topic  
New Member

United States
3 Posts
 Posted 04/17/2021  11:39 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Demano to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hello all, Found this coin today while metal detecting at an 1800's home site, was 10" down. Any info on symbols and age is greatly appreciated by this newbie. Thanks
Edited by Demano
04/18/2021 12:46 am
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United States
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Valued Member
United States
79 Posts
 Posted 04/18/2021  12:16 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 1847bill to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Cool find. It looks like a Chinese cash but picture isn't clear enough. Also you need to post a picture of the other side.
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United States
3 Posts
 Posted 04/18/2021  12:50 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Demano to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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 Posted 04/18/2021  01:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add macmercury to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A Qián Lóng T#333;ng B#462;o (#20094;#38534;#36890;#23542;) coin. From Wikipeida:


Quote:
During the first few years of the reign of the Qianlong Emperor China had suffered from a shortage of cash coins due to the contemporary scarcity of copper, but soon Yunnan's copper mines started producing a large surplus of copper allowing the Qing government to swiftly increase the money supply and minting more coins at a faster pace.[16] In the middle of the Qianlong era as much as 3,700,000 strings of cash were produced annually.[16] In 1741 coins were ordered to be made of an alloy of 50% copper, 41.5% zinc, 6.5% lead, and 2% tin to reduce the likelihood of people melting down coins to make utensils, all while the Qing government encouraged to sell their utensils to the state mints to be melted into coinage.[25] The addition of the 2% tin caused the Chinese people to dub these cash coins qingqian (#38738;#37666;, "green cash").[18]

By the end of the Qianlong era, Yunnan's copper mines started depleting the production of cash coins, and the copper content was debased once more. 1794 all provincial mints were forced to close their doors, but subsequently reopened in 1796.[25]

During the Battle of Ng#7885;c H#7891;i-#272;#7889;ng #272;a in 1788 special Qián Lóng T#333;ng B#462;o coins were minted with An nan (#23433;#21335;) on their reverse sides as a payment for soldiers.[26]

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New Member
United States
3 Posts
 Posted 04/20/2021  12:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Demano to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the information, I love finding old coins with my metal detector, but getting to look into the history of them is so interesting. Thanks for help.
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Australia
42 Posts
 Posted 04/20/2021  8:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add drowning to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice find
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