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Why Does My 1966 Penny Look Like This?

 
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Canada
37 Posts
 Posted 06/14/2022  10:24 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add recollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
the 1966 penny composition is 98% copper, 0.5% tin and 1.5% zinc.
why does mine look like this?




*** Edited by Staff to clarify topic title. Titles are important! ***
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United States
45715 Posts
 Posted 06/14/2022  11:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
. Looks like some kind of staining to me.
John1
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United States
70157 Posts
 Posted 06/14/2022  12:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply




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Canada
15728 Posts
 Posted 06/14/2022  12:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add JimmyD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks like a cup holder coin.
It certainly didn't leave the mint looking like that.

Correct typo
Edited by JimmyD
06/14/2022 12:46 pm
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Australia
14495 Posts
 Posted 06/14/2022  6:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The answer to "why" is, fundamentally, "because it was exposed to an adverse environment". Exactly what that "environment" was, is impossible to say without knowing the history of where the coin has been. Some kind of liquid seems to have been involved, as an adverse gaseous environment would colour the whole coin evenly. It may have been sitting on the ground when some kind of noxious chemical spilled across the floor, for example; the "tide line" visible on both sides implies the coin was sitting on the floor at an angle, with only half the coin getting fully immersed in the liquid.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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Canada
37 Posts
 Posted 06/15/2022  1:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add recollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
its embedded in this holder with other 1966 coins, the dollar, 50 cent piece, quarter and dime. I think its made of acrylic. but I still cant see that as being a reason, seeing as the entire coin is embedded. As far as some chemical, what chemical would do that with no apparent damage to the detail? it also doesn't make sense, as both sides are affected. and if the coin was sitting in a liquid, all the raised parts should have been affected as these would attract the liquid assuming some degree of surface tension to the liquid. It almost looks like copper plating. very weird.

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Canada
37 Posts
 Posted 06/15/2022  1:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add recollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
tideline idea makes the most sense, except the shape doesn't really fit that, especially on the date side.
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Canada
10212 Posts
 Posted 06/15/2022  5:20 pm  Show Profile   Check SPP-Ottawa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add SPP-Ottawa to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It could have been like that when it was placed in the lucite. Looks like a lot of 1c coins I see when I open sealed mint bags.
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Australia
14495 Posts
 Posted 06/15/2022  9:13 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Ah, I see. In this case, what has happened is that there's actually a small air bubble trapped on the coin's surface - the acrylic isn't fully surrounding the coin. It's possible that the piece has seen wild changes in temperature, repeatedly going form hot to cold, and the coin is expanding and contracting at different rates to each other; eventually, all that microscopic pulling and pushing causes the surface of the coin to detach from the acrylic, in places. I have a couple of these acrylic-entombed coins - apparently, they were popular souvenirs in Canada in the 1960s and early 1970s - and one of them, the one my grandma had kept for decades in tropical north Queensland (which can get both very hot, and quite chilly), has turned a similar appearance to this coin. I'll see if I can find it and take some pictures.

The places where the acrylic is still fully bonded to the surface of the coin appear coppery-brown. The paler area is where the acrylic has detached. The microscopic gap between the coin and the surface of the acrylic is acting like an optical "thin-film", causing the strange colours to appear.

I can't explain the dark brown semicircle on the reverse. My guess - []iguess[/i] - is that this is an actual bubble in the acrylic dating from when the object was created, and the coin has been sitting there exposed to that tiny bubble of oxygen for all this time.

The "tide line" might be a relic of the method of manufacture. Coins do not naturally "float" suspended in molten acrylic; being much more dense, they would sink to the bottom if you just dropped a coin into a vat of molten acrylic. So while I'm not privy to their patented manufacture methods, it seems reasonable that when these items are made, there would be several "pourings" of the molten acrylic. You pour a layer of acrylic, let it set, put a coin down on the flat surface, then pour the next layer. A simple single-coin souvenir like the ones I own, or one where all the coins are suspended in the "same plane", just two pourings - top and bottom with the coins sandwiched in between - are all you need. For an object like this with lots of coins at all sorts of crazy angles to each other, multiple pourings would be needed. I suspect the "tide line" is from a time in-between pourings, when the coin was stuck half-submerged in hot molten acrylic waiting for it to cool and harden before the next pouring.

Nor can I explain why only the cent has suffered this fate, and not the other coins. If my hypothesis about heating and shrinking causing the detachment is correct, then perhaps the silver and nickel coins don't shrink as much. A materials scientist might now more than me about this.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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