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US Commemorative Coin Series: Quick Bits #84 - Celebrating A Century, 1800 To 1899 - Part I

 
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 Posted 11/28/2022  11:42 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
The 1800s bore witness to many of the events commemorated by US commemorative coins of the classic era - Statehood Centennials, Municipal Anniversaries, the Civil War, National Expansion and Exploration, to name a few. I've split the list into two pieces to make the annotated list a bit easier to digest.

Even still, lots to cover in this post!

1903 Louisiana Purchase Exposition Gold Dollar

The 1903 Louisiana Purchase Exposition Gold Dollar were included in an Act "To authorize the Government of the United States to participate in celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of the exploration of the Oregon country by Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark in the years eighteen hundred and four, eighteen hundred and five, and eighteen hundred and six, and for other purposes." Among the "other purposes" was "the Secretary of the Treasury shall, upon the request of the Lewis and Clark Centennial and American Pacific Exposition and Oriental Fair Company, cause to be coined at the mints of the United States...gold dollars...to be known as the Lewis and Clark Exposition gold dollar, struck in commemoration of said exposition." The LPE opened on April 30, 1904 and closed on December 1, 1904.

Two types were struck: Thomas Jefferson portrait, and William McKinley portrait.






1904-05 Lewis & Clark Expedition Gold Dollars

The 1904-05 Lewis & Clark Exposition Gold Dollar was authorized in 1902 within an Act "Making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and three, and for other purposes." The Act authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to strike gold dollars "to be known as the Lewis and Clark Exposition gold dollar, struck in commemoration of said exposition." The Lewis & Clark Exposition opened on June 1, 1905 and closed on October 14, 1905.




1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial Half Dollar

The 1918 Illinois Statehood Centennial Half Dollar was struck "in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the admission of the State of Illinois into the Union." Illinois was the 21st State to be admitted - on December 3, 1818. The coin was the first US commemorative piece to mark a Statehood anniversary - multiple others would soon follow.




1920 Maine Statehood Centennial Half Dollar

Maine's Statehood was commemorated in 1920 with the Maine Statehood Centennial Half Dollar. The 50-cent piece was struck "in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the admission of the State of Maine into the Union." Maine was the 23rd State to be admitted - on March 15, 1820.




1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial Half Dollar

The 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial Half Dollar was struck "in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the admission of the State of Alabama into the Union." The bill was signed into law on the same day as the Maine Statehood coin. Alabama was the 22nd State to be admitted to the Union (ahead of Maine), being admitted on December 14, 1819. Its coin was not struck until 1921, however, due to it not being proposed/approved until 1920 and the US Mint not striking the issue until the second half of 1921.

Two varieties of the coin were struck: Plain and 2x2:






1921 Missouri Statehood Centennial Half Dollar

The 1921 Missouri Statehood Centennial Half Dollarwas minted "in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the admission of Missouri into the Union." Missouri was the 24th State to be admitted to the Union, being admitted on August 10, 1821.

Two varieties of the coin were struck: Plain and 2*4:






1922 Ulysses S. Grant Birth Centenary Half Dollar

The 1922 Ulysses S. Grant Birth Centenary Half Dollar and Gold Dollar were struck "in commemoration of the centenary of the birth of General Ulysses S. Grant, late President of the United States." Grant was born on April 27, 1822. He rose to the rank of Commanding General of the Union Army during the Civil War and, after the War, served as President of the United States from 1869 to 1877.

Two varieties of each coin were struck: Plain and with Star - for four coins total.








1923 Monroe Doctrine Enunciation Centennial Half Dollar

The 1923 Monroe Doctrine Enunciation Centennial Half Dollar was struck "in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the enunciation of the Monroe doctrine." The principles that came to be known as the "Monroe Doctrine" were originally points Monroe delivered in his 1823 State of the Union address to Congress - it was not a standalone document like the Declaration of Independence. The points made by Monroe are generally credited to the pen of his Secretary of State - John Quincy Adams.




1925 California Statehood 75th Anniversary Half Dollar

The 1925 California Statehood 75th Anniversary Half Dollar was struck "in commemoration of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the admission of California into the Union." California was the 31st State to be admitted to the Union, doing so on September 9, 1850. California was never an organized territory, it went straight to Statehood. The area was acquired from Mexico in 1848, and was administered by the US military until it became a State.




1925 Fort Vancouver Centennial Half Dollar

The 1925 Fort Vancouver Centennial Half Dollar was minted "in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of the founding of Fort Vancouver, State of Washington." The fort served as a trading post for the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) which administered Britain's interests in the area; the area was jointly occupied by British and American frontiersmen, trappers and settlers.




I'll finish up my look at the 1800s anniversaries later in the week.


For other of my posts about commemorative coins and medals, including more about each of the Classic Era US Commemorative Coin presented here, see: Commems Collection.



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
11/28/2022 4:37 pm
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 Posted 11/28/2022  12:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm finally learning some US history!
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 Posted 11/28/2022  3:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Outstanding commems - I really enjoy reading your concise but history filled summaries for each of these coins.


Quote:
I'm finally learning some US history!


My thoughts exactly. Where was commems during my 10th grade US history class? For example, I did not know the following:


Quote:
California was never an organized territory, it went straight to Statehood.


@ commems - forgive my OCD and I am not trying to become a type editor - but your outstanding threads deserve 100% accuracy so in that spirit I humbly suggest you go back and edit the year Monroe espoused the points in his doctrine:

" .... were originally points Monroe delivered in his 1923 State of the Union address to Congress"
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.jk-dk.art
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 Posted 11/28/2022  4:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
...go back and edit the year Monroe espoused the points in his doctrine

Thanks! Done!

I've lost track of how many times I've typed that error over the years!



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 11/28/2022  7:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Arggh commems - I feel like the nasty unwanted relative at the concert who points out minor blemishes on a fabulous Mozart performance.

In that spirit I defer to you on your interest in being appraised of these going forward.

From my end - I'm simply enthralled to read everything you write so the occasional minor historical date error is not a distraction from the intended educational value of the thread.

All that said - please forgive me if my mention of minor stuff is a distraction to your fabulous efforts on education.
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.jk-dk.art
Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
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 Posted 11/28/2022  8:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@nickelsearcher: Keep 'em coming! I prefer things to be accurate!


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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