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Swedish Livonia Solidus - A Steal?

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 12 / Views: 1,355Next Topic  
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United States
6030 Posts
 Posted 04/04/2016  11:22 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1647-Solidu...8756?txnId=0

I bought a lot of older Russian coins from this seller, and put in my chips on a whole bunch of Swedish Livonia silver coins from the early 17th century. I won most of them, the majority for $0.99-2.50. Most catalogs list these coins at $18+ in VF or higher--many of the coins I purchased appear to be XF or AU. The seller has outstanding feedback and was upfront about any replicas he had for sale, so I am pretty confident that these are genuine.

Did I just luck out, or am I missing something here?
My Collections:
Roman Imperial
http://goccf.com/t/348979
Japan Type set Tokugawa + Modern
http://goccf.com/t/348999
Indo Sassanian
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 Posted 04/04/2016  12:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add pepactonius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Did I just luck out, or am I missing something here?


$4.00 shipping + 0.99 for the coin, so about $5.00 total. This isn't a bad price, since I see others in the US starting at about $7.00 or so. Maybe these things are pretty common and cheap in Latvia?
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 Posted 04/04/2016  12:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Even better--the seller combined shipping. $4 for the first two + $0.50 each additional was advertised, but he combined all shipping for $4 flat.
My Collections:
Roman Imperial
http://goccf.com/t/348979
Japan Type set Tokugawa + Modern
http://goccf.com/t/348999
Indo Sassanian
http://goccf.com/t/322087
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United States
23415 Posts
 Posted 04/04/2016  2:42 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excellent price.
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 Posted 04/04/2016  8:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Maybe these things are pretty common and cheap in Latvia?


Not sure about Latvia specifically, but yes, there are lots and lots of these guys.
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

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Australia
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 Posted 04/12/2016  01:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Enlil to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Lots and lots, for now.
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 Posted 04/12/2016  10:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Got these in the mail a few days ago. Here they are, mixed with the rest from the "Renaissance lot" thread coins:


Most are pretty rough and poorly centered, but a handful are absolutely stunning! Most are from Christina, but also Gustav Adolphus, Sigismund III, and free city of Riga.

The other coins are copper solidii of Jan II of Poland, and a 6 groschen from Prussia.
My Collections:
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http://goccf.com/t/348979
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 Posted 04/12/2016  10:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Also noticing the slightly off center coins, it appears that these coins were made by pressing a huge die into a "sheet" of silver, and then each coin cut out with a circular punch by hand. Is that more or less correct?
My Collections:
Roman Imperial
http://goccf.com/t/348979
Japan Type set Tokugawa + Modern
http://goccf.com/t/348999
Indo Sassanian
http://goccf.com/t/322087
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Russian Federation
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 Posted 04/20/2016  4:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
What's the big coin at top left? Doesn't look like a solidus...
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 Posted 04/21/2016  12:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Haven't taken the time to figure that one out just yet. It's a heavily worn, wafer thin silver coin from about the same time period, at any rate. I had won a lot of misc. coins from the seller, including Russian, German states, Poland, more Swedish solidii, a billon 1 Íre and a couple mystery coins.
My Collections:
Roman Imperial
http://goccf.com/t/348979
Japan Type set Tokugawa + Modern
http://goccf.com/t/348999
Indo Sassanian
http://goccf.com/t/322087
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608 Posts
 Posted 05/17/2016  06:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add publius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Also noticing the slightly off center coins, it appears that these coins were made by pressing a huge die into a "sheet" of silver, and then each coin cut out with a circular punch by hand. Is that more or less correct?


Where do you get that impression? The typical mediaeval coin was struck on a piece of silver cut from a sheet with shears, using two dies which were held together by hand. Good centering is therefore rare.

What you describe, which was never done to my knowledge, would result in pieces with part of another impression intruding on one edge. There were experiments in the Renaissance period with producing coins by a rolling-mill technique, followed by punching- or cutting-out, which could produce such a result, but that's about as close as anyone has ever gotten.
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Russian Federation
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 Posted 05/17/2016  07:28 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Where do you get that impression? The typical mediaeval coin was struck on a piece of silver cut from a sheet with shears, using two dies which were held together by hand. Good centering is therefore rare.

What you describe, which was never done to my knowledge, would result in pieces with part of another impression intruding on one edge. There were experiments in the Renaissance period with producing coins by a rolling-mill technique, followed by punching- or cutting-out, which could produce such a result, but that's about as close as anyone has ever gotten.


To the best of my knowledge, this latter experiment (or something very similar) was, in fact, how the Livonia (and Riga) solidi were made. You can see a tiny piece of this "another impression" on the shiny '47 coin (just left of the middle).

The recent "28 centuries" thread has another shiny '47 (of the Livonian variety), which has a much bigger intruding piece (even with traces of the lettering).
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Lithuania
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 Posted 09/09/2016  4:11 pm  Show Profile   Check giedrius's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add giedrius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
All these coins of 17 century made using the rolling machine.
The rolling machine for minting coins that was based on the principle of the press was invented in 1550 in the Tyrolean town of Halle. It consisted of two shafts connected with a notched gear. Depending on the size the shafts had from 4 to 19 negative images of the obverse and reverse sides of the coin, so that the images chopped on the tape of the tsan after passing it in the machine. The appearance of this machine greatly accelerated the process of manufacturing and also improved the quality of the image on the coins. There was no more displacement of the picture after double or even triple blows that were so characteristic of the hammer gear coinage.
Catalogue of Lithuanian half-groats 1495-1529 http://goccf.com/t/282866
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