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Women Of Rome - Herennia Etruscilla

 
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 Posted 07/07/2017  2:55 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add EFLargeCents to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Not much is really known about Herennia Etruscilla beyond her being the wife of Emperor Decius and the mother to Herennius and Hostilian. She was Augusta from 249-251AD.

No denarii were struck, but several types of Antoninianus along with bronze issues of Sestertius, Dupondius and As. A gold Auereus also was struck with her likeness.

For the Antoninii, reverse inscriptions include FECVNDITAS AVG, IVNO REGINA, and PVDICITIA AVG at the mint in Rome, as well as ADVENTVS AVG, PVDICITIA AVG and SAECVLVM NOVVM at the mint in Antioch.

The style between the mint in Rome and Antioch is distinctively different.

My example is RIC 59b, Rome mint, HER ETRVSCILLA AVG / PVDICITIA AVG.

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 Posted 07/07/2017  3:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Quite a nice example - and superior photography work there. Thanks for sharing!
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 Posted 07/07/2017  3:43 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with Bob.
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 Posted 07/07/2017  4:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Justinokay to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Pretty.
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 Posted 07/07/2017  4:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin!

Another fun fact about her is that in perhaps the only instance in Roman history, Gallus refused to grant the title of Augusta to his own wife so that Etruscilla could maintain her status. At least for the 30-ish days until Hostilian died suddenly of plague.

As a result, there are no coins of Baebiana.
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 Posted 07/07/2017  4:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice coin

I've had a quick look around and the Antioch mint seems a lot rarer and certainly more expensive.

Thanks for sharing

Paul
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 Posted 07/07/2017  6:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for kicking this one off, EFLC, with a nice coin. I will add my notes.


Annia Cupressenia Herennia Etruscilla married Trajan Decius some time before 230 but gained the title Augusta when Decius ascended to the throne in 249 after the defeat of Philip I near Verona. The sources for third century Roman history are comparatively thin, and authentication of reports is meager, so little is known of her life. Yet we may infer that she was likely of a senatorial family, inasmuch as she became regent for her son Hostilian after her husband and her older son, Herennius Etruscus, were defeated and killed in the Battle of Abrittus. However, after Hostilian's death of the plague in 251, Herennia Etruscilla slips yet more firmly into historical oblivion.





I have been apprehensive about posting for this figure. My examples of her coins are few in number and not very attractive. (Coins not on a black background have been purchased but have not yet arrived.) Moreover, though fairly plentiful in low grade, material in her honor is quite limited in variety if not in volume. What there is, is not well understood. The editor of the Introduction (Mattingly?) in RIC expresses it this way, "The coinage of Etruscilla has only one obverse legend, HER. ETRVSCILLA. AVG., and offers no immediate materials for dating. She has two varieties of coiffure, but their significance for dating has not yet been made clear. Probably, the one without ridges, but with a long plait carried up the back of the head, is the later."
This is where I wish to begin my discussion of her coins.

Coiffure Style 1
The image above shows the earlier hair style, which is very similar to that we see on the coins of Otacilia Severa, her predecessor. This has the hair combed down its length then plaited in waves front to back.
Draped bust right on crescent, hair waved and tucked at back of neck, stephane in hair

Coiffure Style 2
This next coin shows the later hair style as Mattingly described it.
Draped bust right on crescent, hair in straight lines with long plait carried up the back of head, stephane in hair




In RIC the coins of Herennia Etruscilla are listed in a section for her among the coins for Trajan Decius. In the case of silver, there are listed two mints to consider, Rome and Antioch. However, all the issues of Antioch are noted as Rare in RIC and are seldom seen in the marketplace. Our display will be limited to the issues from the mint at Rome until someone here finds and shows something from another mint (not counting the occasional hybrids of questionable origin.)


Far and away the most common reverse types for her from Rome bear the inscription PVDICITIA AVG and feature the figure of Pudicitia either seated or standing facing left (see above), holding a scepter in her left hand and fussing with her veil with her right hand. On that last point, there is some variation in the manner of her handling of the veil. Here is the seated type showing a long, strong strand of the veil, which is followed by progressively weaker representations down to no apparent veil (especially on a weak strike).





The form of the type with Pudicitia standing follows a similar progression.



No sense of chronology has so far been associated with these variances.


Next most common, though not seen anywhere nearly as often, are the types bearing Fecunditas standing facing with head to left, holding a patera in her right hand and a cornucopia in her left hand. There is a child to her left reaching up and tugging at her gown.

There are two forms of inscription for this type. The first is FECVNDITAS AVG with a single final "G": (singular)




The second reads FECVNDITAS AVGG (plural)





A third type used at Rome, and least frequently encountered, features Juno standing left, holding patera in right hand and long staff vertically in left. At her feet is a peacock. This is the same posture encountered with earlier Juno reverses bearing different inscriptions.

The reverse inscription reads: IVNO REGINA




Better grade examples of all these coins can be seen at the educational website prepared by Zach Beasley (formerly of Beast Coins, now with Heritage).
https://www.beastcoins.com/RomanImp...ruscilla.htm
Edited by lrbguy
07/07/2017 6:52 pm
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 Posted 07/07/2017  8:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great tag team of info between EFLC and irbguy! Nice work.
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 Posted 07/08/2017  07:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great information lrb and EFL


Quote:
The style between the mint in Rome and Antioch is distinctively different
.
What are the style differences?

Interesting about the use of hairstyles to date the coins more accurately.

Thank you

Paul
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 Posted 07/08/2017  1:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I've had a quick look around and the Antioch mint seems a lot rarer and certainly more expensive.



Have you seen Antioch pieces for sale? May I ask where these may be found, and what kinds of prices you have seen?
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 Posted 07/08/2017  3:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Have you seen Antioch pieces for sale?


There is only one for sale on vcoins at the moment its 170 euros

HERENNIA ETRUSCILLA, - AD 251. Antoninianus, Antioch. (4.18 g, 23 mm).
Bust right, set on crescent; three pellets below / VBERITAS AVG standing left.
RIC 68b.VF

Its with Klassische Muensen...Nice coin but too much for me

Hope this helps.

Saludos Paul
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 Posted 07/10/2017  6:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add augustus1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
lrbguy, that's a very nice set of notes. Thanks!
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 Posted 07/12/2017  11:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lrbguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
You're entirely welcome to use whatever suits you, Warren, and thank you for the affirmation.
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 Posted 05/09/2018  04:21 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nuggethill to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This rev is another PVDICITIA AVG




cheers
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 Posted 09/01/2018  12:25 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coffeyce to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here is my example

Herennia Etruscilla (wife of T. Decius) AR Antoninianus. Rome, AD 250. HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, set on crescent / FECVNDITAS AVGG, Fecunditas standing left extending right hand above child at her feet and holding cornucopia. RIC 56. 3.76g, 23mm, 6h.

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