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Old Asian Coin Round Hole (Id: 19th Century Vietnamese 1 Phan)

 
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United States
60 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2017  11:47 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Brummagem to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi - My first thought was that this coin is Chinese but I haven't had much luck on a quick search so I thought I would ask in case it is from somewhere else. It is sized about 23mm & 3.0g.

Thank you :)



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6064 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2017  12:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Finn235 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks like a contemporary copy/counterfeit of Chinese emperor Kangxi, 1661-1722.

Many SE Asian countries made their own coins from common Chinese coins. These are usually crudely made in very poor quality copper. Likewise, since cash coins were seen as copper bullion by the Chinese (you needed "strings" of 1,000 coins for any major purchase), unscrupulous individuals would melt down genuine coins, add other metals, and then re-cast the alloy.

Try posting it on Zeno.ru for an ID; there are some experts in this coin type who frequent there. Good news is, this is very likely worth more than a genuine Kangxi cash. (Read: worth a few dollars instead of a few cents)
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United States
60 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2017  12:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Brummagem to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's wonderful - appreciate it!

I'll have to give Zeno another try. I have tried a few times before to register there but for some reason it always said registrations were closed and I just gave up. But that was a while ago.
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Belgium
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 Posted 08/03/2017  3:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Petrus to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Indeed one of these:
https://en.numista.com/catalogue/in...y&te=y&cat=y
I found this on internet (or was it here?):
A Chinese Coin with the Powers of a Charm
This is an example of an official Qing (Ch'ing) Dynasty minted coin, meant for general circulation, but which was immediately considered to have the powers of a charm. In the year 1713 AD, to celebrate the 60th birthday of Emperor Sheng Zu (Kang Xi), this special issue kang xi tong bao (#24247;#29081;#36890;#23453;) coin was cast with a bronze of a golden color. A 60th birthday is considered a major event in China. In honor of this milestone, the Chinese character xi (#29081;), which is located below the square hole, was written slightly differently. The character would normally have a vertical line at its left. Also, the part of the character normally written as (#33251;) has the center written as a (#21475;) instead. Finally, the upper left part of the tong (#36890;) character, located to the right of the square hole, has only one dot instead of the usual two.
There are several stories connected with this coin that have been passed down for the last 300 years which have given this coin the power of a charm. The stories have turned out to be historically false but continue to be believed. The different versions of the story basically state that the bronze used in the casting of this coin came from the melting down of gold statues of the eighteen disciples of the Buddha. These disciples were called lohan (luohan #32599;#27721;) in Chinese. Because the metal used to cast the coins was believed to be directly associated with these disciples of Buddha, the coin is believed to have special powers and is usually referred to as the lohan coin or arhat money.
Because of its special charm qualities, these coins were given to children in olden times as lunar New Year money (yasuiqian #21387;#23681;#38065;).
These coins were also considered to represent good luck because they commemorated a reign lasting for sixty years which is a complete cycle of the traditional Chinese calendar and thus symbolic of a long life.
Traditionally, these coins also acted as a keepsake or pledge of love between a man and a woman. Some women would even wear one of these coins tied to their hand in lieu of a "gold" engagement ring.
Up until about the 1940's, there was a tradition in the rural villages of Shanxi Province where stylish young men liked to carry a lohan coin between their teeth. This was an attempt to mimic the tradition of stylish young men in the cities who liked to show off a gold tooth.

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 Posted 08/03/2017  3:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Petrus to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Zeno: Send a mail to the postmaster, he will create an account for you
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United States
52 Posts
 Posted 03/07/2021  11:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oabmarcus to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
the first image is actually upside down, it's "Si de tong bao", it is an Vietnamese coin I think, and worth very little.
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 Posted 03/07/2021  4:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@oab, can you please provide a numista link or other attribution information back up your statement that this coin is Vietnamese? It is fine to express a different opinion, but it is most helpful to the OP when you provide evidence with your opinion. Thx.
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

Valued Member
United States
52 Posts
 Posted 03/08/2021  01:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oabmarcus to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces240687.html


I think it is obvious that this is not a Kangxi, kangxi have manchu scripts in the back, this coin's back is blank. If you turn the coin upside down, I think you'll see the resemblance. It helps if you can read traditional Chinese.
Edited by oabmarcus
03/08/2021 01:59 am
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 Posted 03/08/2021  8:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Ok perfect, thx for adding that link as that really helps with the attribution. I think that you are right on this one.
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

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