Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

I'm a relatively new collector, I don't know where to start.

 
Next Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2
New Member

United States
9 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  12:01 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Jim Halpert to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi everyone,
I started coin collecting a few months ago, but forgot about it for a bit due to school. I started coin collecting as a hobby, meaning I wasn't too serious bout it and didn't want to take up too much time and effort doing it.

What are some beginning steps I can take to start coin collecting a bit more seriously, but not to the point that it becomes the sole way to spend my free time? I

Also, I was thinking about going to a bank and buying a quarter roll or two, but I didn't know if they gave only new coins from the current year, or a mix of whatever other people exchange.
I'm also under 18, so I don't have that much free roam.

Thank You!
Valued Member
United States
160 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  12:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CoinBuffalo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


The way I started off was getting penny rolls from the bank and looking for wheat pennies. They're still fairly common to find and are a good starting point. Buying quarter rolls won't get you much unless you want to collect State or ATB Quarters. They can hand you whatever roll they have on hand, it can be new or mixed. Just never be an inconvenience and ask them to give you a different one, they might turn you away.

Another thing you can do is find a classic design you really like, US or even foreign, and try to put together a set of those, or just stack them. Some coins even in low grades are quite nice so you don't have to break the bank
New Member
United States
9 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  01:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Jim Halpert to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hey CoinBuffalo!
Thanks for the tip with the pennies, the only reason I mentioned the quarters is because I got super absorbed into them, but yeah, I've definitely noticed that its a ton easier to find older pennies that it is for quarters. Also, I would never find enough confidence to ask for a new roll, so I'm sure that wont be a problem XD.

Can you explain your ast paragraph?
What is a classic design? What does stack mean? Break the bank?
Thank you!
Valued Member
United States
200 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  06:31 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Lionel90 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you are interested in quarters then go for it. I just started ATB (parks) quarters but it ties up lots of cash compared to cents. I get $5 of cents rolls from the bank. I also get $50 of quarters from the bank. Try some roll hunting and see what you like. The good thing is they can all go back to the bank if you change your mind abount one group of coins.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
Japan
505 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  06:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Half to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good evening Jim,

Classic design are, typically, the old designs which are no longer produced/circulated such as the wheat cents, Buffalo nickels, Standing Liberty quarters and such.

Stacking is just an easy way to say "accumulating".

Breaking the bank is another way of saying "spend more money than you can afford".


As far as getting started goes......do research. Read books, peruse this forum (isn't it awesome?), talk to the family about taking you to a coin club or coin show if such occur locally. Find yourself a Red Book for US coins or a Krause catalog for a broad view of modern foreign coins.

I recommend collecting cents out of circulation, as it is fairly easy to finish a set of Lincoln shields and does not cost much, while you research and figure out what you like.
New Member
United States
40 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  06:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bzookaj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Whichever coins you choose to collect, buy an album. Dansco and Whitman are the two main brands. This will make storage easy, and guide your collection.
Edited by bzookaj
12/07/2018 06:48 am
Valued Member
United States
297 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  07:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TJLang to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with above.
Start by looking at your change. Cherry Picking.
Yes and then Google everything, Youtube also works well.
I like my credit union because they have a change counting machine.
I will get customer rolled quarters from them and if I don't find anything I just dump them back in the machine.
you also need some books to store the good things you find.
Then when you find something better exchange them your self

Best of Luck and Happy Hunting.
Hey Cashier, What's in your draw? have anything odd ? New or Old?
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
9347 Posts
 Posted 12/07/2018  07:18 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add T-BOP to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Ok your under 18 so I'm assuming funds are low . Like most have said start with coin roll hunting Lincoln Cents and Jefferson nickels . If you want to be sure you don't get a solid roll of all one date then ask the teller for customer wrapped rolls . Buy a couple of books as mentioned and look for errors and varieties , as well as high grade and older dates . good luck .
Don't take life too seriously and remember it is just a passing fad ......
Michael Philip Jagger

Valued Member
United States
308 Posts
 Posted 12/08/2018  10:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CoinHunter27 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hello and
Since you are under 18 and probably have a limited income, I suggest going to the bank when you get the chance to, and buying pennies. I always hunt pennies because it's super cheap and has a variety of things to look for. Finding old-er coins is not too difficult with pennies, as wheat pennies are usually passed on in circulation. At 50 a roll I usually just buy 10-16 rolls depending on how much money I brought with me. (Also another good thing to remember is to be specific in what you are buying at the bank, as I often get handed flat rolls with no coins if I don't specify) Hope this helps and Happy Hunting!

-CH27
New Member
United States
9 Posts
 Posted 12/08/2018  12:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Jim Halpert to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks y'all for the suggestions, I'm definitely going to try switching to pennies, because I've realized that as someone's said(I can't find it now.), it takes $10 to get 40 quarters and 50c to get 50 pennies. Ill try to get coin book, but does it matter if I get a book that's like *1950-2018*, or can I get one that's completely blank?
Thank You all!
Valued Member
Canada
173 Posts
 Posted 12/08/2018  12:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Cdncoins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It sounds like you are focusing on U.S. coins. As a couple of others mentioned, I really recommend you get the Red Book of United States coins. You can buy it for fairly cheap on Amazon. This book is a great place to get familiarized with different errors to look out for, dates that are less common than others (key dates) and a history of the coins issued in the U.S.

By getting rolls from the bank, you can work on building out a date set (including mint marks or not) for different denominations. Then as others have mentioned, you can pick up coin albums to hold and display them.
Pillar of the Community
United States
2519 Posts
 Posted 12/08/2018  1:54 pm  Show Profile   Check Darth Morgan's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Darth Morgan to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you ever decide to start buying coins at a premium, then may I suggest the Eisenhower dollar series. It is a short run (1971-1978), but in this series you have a nice variety of copper and silver issues, both in proof and business strike form. It's an affordable set, even for someone just starting out. Here is one of my sets, which include every date and mint mark for the standard set. The complete variety set is a rabbit hole that few venture into.



My Eisenhower dollar Complete Variety Set, Circulation Strikes and Proof (PCGS Registry) - https://www.PCGS.com/SetRegistry/do...edset/119137
Edited by Darth Morgan
12/08/2018 1:54 pm
Valued Member
United States
200 Posts
 Posted 12/08/2018  1:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Lionel90 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I saw a thread on the forum last year recommending Ollies outlet. I picked up the Mega Red Book for a fraction of the price in Jan or Feb Its so large and filled with pictures.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
63411 Posts
 Posted Yesterday  12:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
If you ever decide to start buying coins at a premium, then may I suggest the Eisenhower dollar series.
I second that recommendation.
Bedrock of the Community
United States
17184 Posts
 Posted Yesterday  11:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
My suggestions are to:
1. Look on line or at a hobby store for a copy of the Whitman Red Book.
Almost any edition is OK for general information.
2. Start out collecting pennies since they will not hurt much in the wallet for now.
3. Ask parents, friends, neighbors, relatives if they have any old coins laying around.
4. If you can afford it for now, attempt to get Albums for your coins. Not what is called Folders.
just carl
New Member
United States
7 Posts
 Posted Yesterday  1:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ericalynn13 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
WELCOME!!

Start with what fascinates you the most -- what coin do you find yourself looking through your change for? What coin do you hope you will get back from a purchase? When I was younger I knew every vending machine in town that gave me Susan B Anthony $1 coins as change ;)

I'm almost 40 years old and have been collecting since I was 5 - and I still change up my "what I'm looking for" often! I did an entire set of the 50 State Quarters only to realize "hey I don't like quarters!" and traded them away for something I wanted more.

1. YES!! Ask for customer rolled coins when buying at the bank. Instead of just "Hi can I buy a roll of quarters?" change your question "Hi! Can I buy a roll of customer rolled quarters?"
2. Decide ahead of time what you are willing to spend and stick to it! In the past I was willing to spend up to 5x the face value of the coin to get one I wanted, now I'm broke, my finances have changed and if I can't find the coin for the face value I don't collect it. (that will change again in the future)
3. Shout to the rooftops that you love which ever coin you are collecting and your closest friends and some family might help you "search". But I advise to be hesitant who you share your actual collection with. Its one thing for folks to know you are crazy about coins and are looking for certain ones, HOWEVER many people are more then happy to part you from your coins have a few precautions in place so you don't become the victim of theft.
4. When I was younger anyone who had a coin jars/change jar was my best source - my uncle would give me 5% to roll his coins and he paid me with my finds. Grandpa always had a change jar or bottle I could dig through. Again BEFORE digging know what you want to spend.

Most of all HAVE FUN WITH IT! When its not fun anymore, why bother!?! This group is amazing, you've found a great resource.

HAPPY HUNTING :P
Edited by ericalynn13
Yesterday 1:33 pm
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.88 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05