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Ebay Start Collecting Sales Tax

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Pillar of the Community
United States
5141 Posts
 Posted 11/01/2019  01:37 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Jaobler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I will never understand why so many people believe this.

I attended our annual coin show last Friday and Saturday. I made four purchases from four different dealers. Purchase amounts ranged from $8 to $900. None of the dealers charged sales tax. I've never had to pay sales tax for any coin show purchase I've made in the last 20 years.

Personal experience confirms that I can avoid sales tax at coin shows. Maybe the situation is different in other states. If I purchase from a local coin shop they always charge tax, unless my purchase total meets the California tax-exempt threshold of $1500.

Unless a particular eBay listing offers an exceptional deal, buying at a show clearly presents an advantage.
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 Posted 11/01/2019  02:21 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alpha2814 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's not impossible that the dealer back-calculates what the sales tax would have been to bring the total to the amount you paid. For example, when I was a kid, I remember something like paying $2.50 for a movie ticket, but the ticket itself said "$2.30 admission price, $0.20 sales tax". I didn't explicitly pay the tax, but the ticket accounted for it.

If I get a receipt for the transaction at a show, the dealer has a record of the sale. What the dealer does after that point is their business -- paying appropriate sales tax might be part of it, and it wouldn't be hard to do it without your knowledge.
Working on: Indian quarter eagles, Chinese pandas, and San Francisco tokens; upgrading my Peace dollar and US Type sets

"Fear is the enemy of will. Will is what makes you take action; fear is what stops you, and makes you weak."
-- Sinestro to (my avatar) Hal Jordan, "Green Lantern" (2011)
Bedrock of the Community
13014 Posts
 Posted 11/02/2019  02:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add basebal21 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:

Personal experience confirms that I can avoid sales tax at coin shows.

Unless a particular eBay listing offers an exceptional deal, buying at a show clearly presents an advantage


Another misconception.

If you're getting charged sales tax online you are almost always supposed to be paying it in person, if dealers aren't reporting it or building it into the price to report than it's just a matter of time before agents start testing shows especially if people are making public claims about it online.

If you don't like sales tax vote for people against it or contact your state/local government, you aren't legally avoiding it at shows if you have to pay it online almost anywhere though

I expect that anything at a show the sales tax is built in where applicable, hence one of the reasons so many things are more expensive there
Edited by basebal21
11/02/2019 03:05 am
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 Posted 01/05/2020  8:59 pm  Show Profile   Check Paul Bulgerin's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Paul Bulgerin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I live in Wisconsin and found that my first two eBay purchases of 2020 have had me paying sales tax. That's new.
Paul Bulgerin
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 Posted 01/06/2020  10:51 pm  Show Profile   Check edweather's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add edweather to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wisconsin, Michigan, North Carolina, and Illinois began 1/1/20. Up to 38 states now + DC of course.
Edited by edweather
01/06/2020 10:53 pm
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677 Posts
 Posted 01/23/2020  5:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Jon K to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is what the sellers end looks like.
This is a $50 sale to Texas.
Oh goodie. Another fee.


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 Posted 01/24/2020  8:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add BStrauss3 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
If I get a receipt for the transaction at a show, the dealer has a record of the sale. What the dealer does after that point is their business -- paying appropriate sales tax might be part of it, and it wouldn't be hard to do it without your knowledge.



Um... No...

If you get a receipt that doesn't show you paid the tax, then you didn't and owe use tax. If the dealer pays too, that's a gift to the state. That's why the other posters movie ticket showed the break down... Proof the tax was paid.
-----Burton
46 year / Life ANA member (joined 12/1/1973)
Life member: Numismatics International, CONECA
Member: TNA, FtWCC, NETCC
Owned by four cats and a wife of 35 years (joined 1983)
Pillar of the Community
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 Posted 01/24/2020  9:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alpha2814 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
If you get a receipt that doesn't show you paid the tax, then you didn't and owe use tax. If the dealer pays too, that's a gift to the state. That's why the other posters movie ticket showed the break down... Proof the tax was paid.

I posted both comments you're referencing here. My point in this case is that at a coin show, I pay some amount. It's possible that amount can be recorded as having included the tax in the final price I paid. So from the dealer's perspective, instead of recording a sale of $30 for a coin with no tax, it could be $27.50 for the coin and $2.50 tax that the dealer pays on my behalf, and they could do this after I've left. If I live in the same state as the dealer, use tax doesn't come into play, and the last couple of purchases I made at a show, I didn't get a receipt anyway (I didn't ask, didn't feel I needed one). What the dealer does about tax, up to them. They could pay it for me, or not at all (which is probably the case, but it wouldn't be hard to do the math if they chose to).
Working on: Indian quarter eagles, Chinese pandas, and San Francisco tokens; upgrading my Peace dollar and US Type sets

"Fear is the enemy of will. Will is what makes you take action; fear is what stops you, and makes you weak."
-- Sinestro to (my avatar) Hal Jordan, "Green Lantern" (2011)
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 Posted 01/25/2020  11:50 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add BStrauss3 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As the purchaser, part of the legal responsibility rests with you.

https://www.cdtfa.ca.gov/taxes-and-.../use-tax.htm


Quote:
Overview
California's sales tax generally applies to the sale of merchandise, including vehicles, in the state. California's use tax applies to the use, storage, or other consumption of those same kinds of items in the state.

Generally, if sales tax would apply when you buy physical merchandise in California, use tax applies when you make a similar purchase without tax from a business located outside the state.


and


Quote:
Sales Tax vs. Use Tax: What's the Difference?
Tax collected by the retailer here in California is called sales tax, and the retailer is responsible for reporting and paying the tax to the state. When an out-of-state or online retailer doesn't collect the tax for an item delivered to California, the purchaser may owe "use tax," which is simply a tax on the use, storage, or consumption of personal property in California.


It sounds as if you can buy from a dealer at a CA show and assume the dealer pays the tax, regardless of whether the receipt itemizes it. But if you head over to Vegas, well what you buy in Vegas better stay in Vegas or you owe the tax.


The rules in other states may differ, e.g. https://comptroller.texas.gov/taxes.../use-tax.php


Quote:
Who is responsible for this tax?

...

Quote:
Sometimes use tax is due even when you buy an item in Texas. If you buy an item in a part of Texas with no local taxes, you will pay state sales tax (6.25 percent) on that purchase. But if you use the item in an area that imposes a local tax, you owe that local use tax.

EXAMPLE: You live in Houston, have travelled to an area with no local tax and buy an item for $200 from a seller in that area. The seller only charges state sales tax of $12.50, or 6.25 percent. Since the use tax rate in Houston is 8.25 percent, you owe the 2 percent local use tax of $4.00.

-----Burton
46 year / Life ANA member (joined 12/1/1973)
Life member: Numismatics International, CONECA
Member: TNA, FtWCC, NETCC
Owned by four cats and a wife of 35 years (joined 1983)
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