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What's An Elongated Penny?

 
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Australia
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 Posted 07/05/2020  09:21 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add polarboy to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I was browsing ebay and have come across a bunch of elongated pennies and I just wondered technically what are they?
Are they legal tender?
Are they made from legal tender somehow?
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United States
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 Posted 07/05/2020  10:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
When they are made on a legal tender coin,they are no longer legal tender after they are rolled. Elongated coins are meant to be souvenirs.
John1
( I'm no pro, it's just my humble opinion )
Searched 5+ Million Cents Since 1971
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Australia
35 Posts
 Posted 07/05/2020  10:39 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add polarboy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
So basically they are just a fun thing if you happen to like the picture that has been stamped on them?
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United States
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 Posted 07/05/2020  10:58 am  Show Profile   Check nss-52's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add nss-52 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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 Posted 07/05/2020  11:07 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add keith12 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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Australia
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 Posted 07/06/2020  12:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In Australia, "elongated pennies" are usually made using the same machine-presses they use in American to elongate 1 cent coins, except that here, most sellers use specially-made plated-zinc blanks. Using legal tender Australian coins in such machines is illegal in Australia, plus, the presses are designed for the soft zinc-cored American coins, and can't handle a cupronickel coin, so they need to elongate an object that's about the same size and consistency as an American cent.

The vast bulk of such pieces I've seen for sale here in Australia have not used American cents for the undertype coin. Apparently, importing a bunch of shiny new American 1 cent coins is more expensive than procuring their own blank metal discs for use in the machines. Plus, if they use blanks, they don't have the "problem" of tourists going to an iconic Australian tourist trap only to buy a souvenir with Abraham Lincoln or "United States of America" readable on the back.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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Australia
108 Posts
 Posted 07/08/2020  11:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add David Graham to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
So ingenious.
Just to get this straight - the tourist supplies their own penny and does the manual work plus donates a dollar. Awesome.
I have seen elongated pennies but didn't know what the rolling machine looked like nor how it operated. Love it!
Edited by David Graham
07/08/2020 11:22 pm
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United States
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 Posted 07/09/2020  08:27 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In the USA it is common to destroy our money.
just carl
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United Kingdom
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 Posted 07/09/2020  08:54 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
They are quite popular in the UK and Europe too, although not as common as in the USA. Here's a machine in Southampton, England, with the four pennies I got from it!

I've come across several penny-squashing machines in Australia. One, in Melbourne, was pre-loaded with American cents. The others all took bronze discs.

In the UK you can use British pennies quite legally in these machines. In Eurozone countries most machines take 5 euro cent coins, although some in Germany take 2c coins.
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 Posted 07/09/2020  11:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Just to get this straight - the tourist supplies their own penny and does the manual work plus donates a dollar. Awesome.
That is correct!
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 Posted 07/10/2020  01:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Closer images of the actual machine so you can get an idea how they work

this is a free standing manual machine


Side view of the working portion. You see the crank handle at the lower left. It turns the small gear which drives the large gear. The large gear is attached to the spindle that contains the design die. At the other end of the spindle is another small gear which drives a spindle below it which has a blank die. the two knobs at the top adjust the distance between the two die spindles.


In this image you can see the feed chute. You pull the slide out, put the coin in and push it forward so the dies can grab the coin and pull it through without getting you hands close to the rollers.


Here is an upper image of one that can either be hand cranked or electrically driven that shows what the spindle dies look like.


And here is a die sleeve that slips over the spindle and is locked in place with set screws. Note the large natch at the right hand edge of the die, this makes it easier for the roller to grab the coin and pull it through. Without that the leading edge might not grab the coin at first and be part way through the rotation before the coin gets pulled in resulting in an elongated coin with only part of the design on it.


(Actually I suspect this is a reversed image of a hub used for making duplicate roller dies. Note the missing beads at the bottom center. I think this is a hub and those beads have chipped off.)
Gary Schmidt
Edited by Conder101
07/10/2020 01:26 am
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United States
412 Posts
 Posted 07/13/2020  9:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Wideglide to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
When I was a kid (like 50 years ago) we used to put coins on railroad tracks, and let the freight trains run over them. You usually lost a lot of them, but you sometimes got some really interesting results...




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