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1962 D LMC Doubled Eye -- Alloy And Die Pressing Question

 
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 Posted 10/28/2020  10:51 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add shantiom to your friends list Get a Link to this Message


This analysis concerns whether the flow of alloy during pressing can give an impression there is doubling but likely not. Someone explained to me the phenomena is like taking a finger through sand and the ridges developing on the trail of your path is what can happen to the planchet alloy when the die is pressed into the metal.

Here, I thought this was a doubled eye but when I went through the roll, there were features this was just one of those ridges at pressing.

Can someone explain how to identify this phenomena and the illusion of a variety.

Thank you.




Edited by shantiom
10/28/2020 12:21 pm
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 Posted 10/28/2020  12:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Incuse marks on a coin is 99% of the time post strike damage. If it were a die issue, the areas in question would be raised, not incuse.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 10/28/2020  1:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add shantiom to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I there a strike going through the eyelid to create illusion of two?
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 Posted 10/28/2020  1:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Note the metal splash away from the incuse area. That is PSD. On a struck through error the fields will not show that splash affect:
Splash affect:

Note how the metal moves away from the crater?

Struck through wire:

Note how the wire during the strike shows, but no splash as the field dies prevented this from happening.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Edited by coop
10/28/2020 1:53 pm
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United States
135 Posts
 Posted 10/28/2020  1:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add shantiom to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Amazing analysis, the word splash is fitting!!
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 Posted 10/28/2020  3:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add rmpsrpms to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Incuse marks on the field, or that cross from devices to field, are almost certainly due to struck-throughs or PMD. However, incuse marks on high points can be remnants of planchet marks.

High points of the coin do not receive the high striking pressure that lower points (or especially the field)do. A full strike will "fill" the die completely, with the tallest points looking exactly like the deepest parts of the die (or alternatively like the tallest points of the hub). But if striking pressure is insufficient to press the planchet metal completely into the deepest recesses of the die, those areas will look more like the planchet, and may contain scratches and such that are present prior to striking. A common area to see this is on Lincoln's shoulder. In this area, planchet marks due to a weak strike are sometimes mistaken as bag marks/hits or even rub.
Contact me for photographic equipment or visit my home page at:
http://macrocoins.com
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