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Rare Celtic Britain, Cunobelin, Catuvellauni & Trinovantes.

 
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Spain
2234 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2021  07:40 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Just picked up this little rarity from Celtic Britain as I was initially drawn to the coins reverse depiction of a metal worker and it went from there. This is my first Celtic coin and find the history really interesting.
King of the Britons "Cunobelin" ("Strong Dog"). From the Catuvellauni & Trinovantes tribes.
Here it is...
Britannia, Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Cunobelin. Circa 9-41 AD. AE Unit (2.437 g, 14mm).
Obv: Winged head left, CVNO in front, BELIN behind.
Rev: Metal worker, presumably the smith god known as Sucellus in parts of Gaul, sitting on a solid seat with a detached upright back, holding an L-shaped hammer in his right hand, left hand holding a metal bowl, there is always a distinct bun of hair behind the smith's head, TASCIO (Tascionus his father) behind, beaded border.
Van Arsdell 2097; ABC 2969; SCBC 342. Hobbs 1972-83;..VF.


Cunobelin came into power around 9 AD and claimed to be the son of Tasciovanus, the previous king of the Caluvellani tribe its Capital being Verlamion (Modern day St Albans). Soon after he annexed the Trinovantes tribe that laid to the East with its Capital being Camulodunum (Modern day Colchester). The Triovantes had become allies to Rome via a treaty that had been made with Julius Caesar on his initial invasion of Britain back in 55/54 BC. This alliance continued with the accession of Augustus as the Roman military at the time were stretched to their limit due to the continual attacks in Germania. This allowed Cunobelin to become a client king to augustus and Rome and became known as the first 'King of the Britons' controlling the majority of South Eastern Britain until his death around AD 40.

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Sweden
652 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2021  08:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add erafjel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's a wonderful coin!

Nice write-up, learnt something about Celtic culture today .
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United States
18946 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2021  12:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
This is my first Celtic coin and find the history really interesting.


Very glad for you to embark on this new area of collecting. I've only dabbled on the shores, but it seems like there is a whole ocean to learn.
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

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United States
5716 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2021  1:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bob L to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice, Paul. Interesting write-up. Surely, you won't be content with just the one Celtic, right? More in the future?

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23489 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2021  5:10 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting coin Paul.
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United Kingdom
592 Posts
 Posted 01/09/2021  6:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Novicius to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I haven't seen one of these before, and it is really interesting to see the metal worker with the "L" shaped hammer. A most interesting write-up too.

A really nice acquisition, Paul. Now that you have the first 'King of the Britons', how many more will follow?
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Spain
2234 Posts
 Posted 01/14/2021  6:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks everyone for the comments, really appreciated!

This was an impulse purchase as it's not an area I collect in normally, primarily because Celtic coins can get expensive! But this coin REALLY called to me and the fact it's quite rare is an extra bonus.
I grew up in Dumnonii territory so this could be an appealing area to look into, I'll keep you posted...
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United Kingdom
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 Posted 01/20/2021  12:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add richtea to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Lovely coin, excellent write-up!

What impresses me is that although the Romans only fully invaded in 47 AD, they had the Brits around their little finger, so to speak, many tens of years before that, to the point of dominating the coinage (i.e. Roman lettering on most of the later Celtic coins).

What was in it for the Brits? And what drove the Romans to stop taking the tribute, and come and get the rest. Slavery, materials, land?

I can confirm it wasn't the weather they desired...
Edited by richtea
01/20/2021 12:34 pm
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Spain
2234 Posts
 Posted 01/22/2021  5:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Palouche to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks @richtea, glad you like the coin and welcome to the Forum...Nice to see a fellow Brit posting!

Quote:
I can confirm it wasn't the weather they desired...
. Yep I second that!
I was born and grew up in Devon and as you know the south west is renowned for being 'wet, wet, wet!'. So left England 20 years ago due to the strange and sudden growth of skin between my toes!

I personally feel this is why the Romans allowed client rulers in inhospitable terrains such as Britania. Their military style of battle wasn't really designed for 70% woodland and 150% wet mud!...Although they could be very versatile when focused. Keeping indigenous tribal armies such as the Trinovante and Caluvellani sweet was an easy way to annexationally hold control until they were ready!...There was definitely reciprocal trade between Rome and the Britons at this time, as archaeological digs have found a great deal of luxurious goods imported from Europe such as Italian wines and drinking vessels, olive oil, glassware and jewellery. Rome received grain, gold, silver, iron, hides, slaves and hunting dogs.........A nice little set up right up to Caligulas take over when the Romans collected all those shells!

Paul.
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