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Commems Collection: How Long Did They Live?

 
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 Posted 07/11/2021  10:59 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Within the classic US commemorative coin series, there are four coins whose designs depict a person who was living at the time of the coin's issue. Of course, at some point following the coin's release, its featured individual passed on.

Here's a list of the coins and the featured individual:

1. The 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial half dollar. It includes a portrait of the then-current Alabama Governor, Thomas Kilby.

2. 1926 American Independence Sesquicentennial half dollar. The then-sitting US President, Calvin Coolidge, was featured along with the nation's first president, George Washington.

3. 1936 Arkansas Statehood Centennial - Robinson Variety half dollar. The reverse of the coin presents a portrait of Senator Joseph Robinson.

4. 1936 Lynchburg, VA Sesquicentennial half dollar. The obverse of the coin presents a left-facing portrait of Senator, and former US Secretary of the Treasury, Carter Glass.

Here's the question: Among the four men featured on the coins listed, who died the soonest after appearing on their coin? (Before anyone posts about the "curse of the commemorative," I am not suggesting in any way, shape or form that the individual's appearance on the coin in any way led to an untimely death.)

Who do you think? I'll post the correct answer in a day or so. (This one's probably too easy, but it is an interesting bit of trivia!)


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 07/12/2021  05:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'll have a go at this commems, need access to some references first so my reply to follow.
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 Posted 07/12/2021  08:16 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kenwright396 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting topic and question. Looking forward to the answers.
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 Posted 07/12/2021  08:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Above my pay grade. Have fun, you guys!
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 Posted 07/12/2021  10:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bump111 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Senator Joseph Robinson died the year following release of the Arkansas. The others lived 7-12 years beyond release. I think that would make Senator Robinson the "winner"...
"Nummi rari mira sunt, si sumptus ferre potes." - Christophorus filius Scotiae
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 Posted 07/12/2021  12:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Above my pay grade.
Wikipedia too much for you?


Quote:
Senator Joseph Robinson died the year following release of the Arkansas. The others lived 7-12 years beyond release. I think that would make Senator Robinson the "winner"...


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 Posted 07/12/2021  12:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Appears that we have an answer from Bump111.

I'll go with that, pending commems concurrence.
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.jk-dk.art
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 Posted 07/12/2021  1:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@Bump111: You're correct!

The individual with the distinction of living for the shortest time after appearing on a US commemorative coin is: Joseph Taylor Robinson; he died of heart failure about six months after the coin with his portrait was released.

Here's a quick comparison summary of the four candidates:

1. Alabama Statehood Centennial / Thomas Kilby: Coin released in October 1921, Kilby died on October 22, 1943 - approximately 22 years later. (4th place)

2. American Independence Sesquicentennial / Calvin Coolidge: Coin released in June 1926, Coolidge died on January 5, 1933 - approximately 7-1/2 years later. (2nd Place)

3. Arkansas Statehood Centennial / Joseph Robinson: Coin was struck and released in January 1937 (the "1936" seen on the coin was mandated by its authorizing legislation), Robinson, called the "fightingest" man in the U.S. Senate, died unexpectedly of heart failure on July 14, 1937 - approximately six months later. He had spent nearly 34 years serving Arkansas in various positions.

At the time of his death, Robinson, a Democrat, was the Senate Majority Leader; he had previously served as the Senate Minority Leader. Robinson was first elected to the Senate (by the Arkansas state legislature vs. public election) to replace the recently-deceased Jefferson Davis, beginning his service on March 10, 1913. He had briefly served as the Governor of Arkansas (January 16, 1913 to March 8, 1913), but resigned from the position to become the US Senator from Arkansas. Prior to being elected governor, Robinson was a member of the US House of Representatives, beginning service for Arkansas on March 4, 1903; he resigned his position on January 14, 1913 to become governor.

4. Lynchburg, VA Sesquicentennial / Carter Glass: Coin released in September 1936, Glass died on May 28, 1946 - approximately 9-2/3 years later. (3rd Place)

1936 Arkansas Statehood Centennial - Robinson Type


Fourth Place never looked so good!

I've posted about all of these coins before, you can read about them via the links at: Read More: Commems Collection.

For a discussion of living people on US commemorative coins (classic and modern), check out:

- Alive and Well (At the Time!)


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
07/12/2021 1:08 pm
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