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What Are Reverse Proof Coins And How Are They Made?

 
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 Posted 11/16/2022  2:29 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add CCFPress to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
PCGS - The United States Mint has been producing proof coinage since at least the mid-19th century and over the years has struck a wide variety of proofs - brilliant proofs, matte proofs, and cameo proofs among them. However, in more recent years the U.S. Mint has begun producing a new type of proof coin. This newfangled offering, known as the reverse proof, provides a specially struck proof coin wherein the devices, inscriptions, and other raised portions of the coin boast mirror-like resilience and the fields - the sunken flat areas - are frosted. This is a complete reversal of the more traditional proofs, with the frosted devices and lettering contrasted against mirrored fields.


2006-P Reverse Proof American Silver Eagle. Courtesy of PCGS TrueView. Click image to enlarge.

While mints around the world have been implementing reverse proof technology for some time now, it's a relatively new concept for the U.S. Mint, which first released reverse proof coins in 2006. Reverse proofs were struck by the United States Mint on a fairly sporadic basis until only the past few years, when they have become something of a mainstay offering - if still a novel one in its own right.

Proof coins are made using highly polished planchets that are struck with specially prepared planchets. The dies themselves are carefully selected dies and must be in virtually perfect condition. Historically, the dies were treated with acid to create frosted devices, which are sunken on the die while the fields are polished - thus providing the traditional cameo-mirror contrast. With the rise in digital technology, the mint uses a computer-aided laser to produce the frosted texturing on proof dies, and this allows coiners to impart the frosting on virtually any part of the die.

Minters can now direct the frosted texturing on the fields while polishing the devices and other sunken areas on the die, thus creating the reverse proof. This same laser technology has helped give rise to diverse coin finishes that were never even technologically feasible just a few decades ago. The mold was certainly broken with reverse proof coins, which are now one of the most popular offerings in the U.S. Mint catalog.

Check out Reverse Proofs on ebay.
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 Posted 11/16/2022  2:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fascinating! The reverse proof felt too gimmicky at first, but I have grown to love them.
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 Posted 11/16/2022  5:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wallyb to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very informative, thank-you!
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 Posted 11/16/2022  8:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CelticKnot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good info. Now we need a similar writeup on the Enhanced Reverse Proofs.
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 Posted 11/17/2022  10:50 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:

Quote:
Now we need a similar writeup on the Enhanced Reverse Proofs

Are you volunteering Celtic?
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 Posted 11/20/2022  11:35 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CelticKnot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hehehe I would have to do a little research on that.
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 Posted 11/25/2022  09:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add morgans dad to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
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 Posted 11/25/2022  10:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Now we need a similar writeup on the Enhanced Reverse Proofs.


Per the US Mint:

A standard reverse proof coin is one featuring an "inverted" proof finish. The background is frosted, while the design elements are polished to a mirror-like finish, creating a magnificent contrast. This enhanced reverse proof coin has the same frosted background as a reverse proof coin, but what sets it apart are the multiple polished and frosted finishes applied to different isolated design elements. The selective polishing and frosting dramatically enhances the visual impact of the design.

Here's a link to the Mint's web site that offers illustrations:

- What are the differences between Reverse Proof and Enhanced Reverse Proof finishes?






Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 11/26/2022  7:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CelticKnot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, thank you, commems. I recall some other similiar info from the mint but that sums it up well.
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