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Help Identifying These Ancients Please | Roman Egypt Tets

 
 
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 Posted 08/02/2009  1:16 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add TokenDave to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Here are two ancients. They appear to be the same figure and I suspect they are Greek Imperial Coins but I am new to ancients and could be way off. Thank you for looking.



Identified - moved to Ancients forum - Sap
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 Posted 08/02/2009  1:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TokenDave to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here are the reverse images:

Pillar of the Community
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671 Posts
 Posted 08/02/2009  2:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sir Ferrari to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
These are Roman coins, not Greek. As to exactly who the emperor is, I cannot tell much from the scans, but it appears to be one from the 3rd-4th century AD. If you post larger pictures of the coins, I could probably narrow it down some more.
Edited by Sir Ferrari
08/02/2009 8:24 pm
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 Posted 08/02/2009  2:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add DVCollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
No doubt, one of those "strongman" emperors, from the same period as this Probus Tetradrachm (issued in Alexandria c.276 ad)

Edited by DVCollector
08/02/2009 2:58 pm
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 Posted 08/02/2009  6:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sir Ferrari: "Greek Imperial" is an older term sometimes still used to describe Roman Provincial coins; it derives from the fact that these coins almost always use Greek lettering rather than Latin. The term is not encouraged among numismatists these days precisely because of the confusion the term "Greek" generates.

TokenDave: these are indeed "Greek Imperial" coins, specifically, billon (base-silver) tetradrachms from Alexandria, and of much the same time period as the Probus one posted by DVC (late 200's AD). I can't quite make out the inscriptions to identify the emperors properly (slightly larger pics of the obverses may help). The one on the right is from an emperor that reigned for at least six years; "L S" is Egyptian-Greek shorthand for "Year 6". I believe the one on the left is dated "Year 4".
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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 Posted 08/02/2009  8:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sir Ferrari to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Sir Ferrari: "Greek Imperial" is an older term sometimes still used to describe Roman Provincial coins; it derives from the fact that these coins almost always use Greek lettering rather than Latin. The term is not encouraged among numismatists these days precisely because of the confusion the term "Greek" generates.


Ah, I didn't know that, thank you for correcting me.
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 Posted 08/03/2009  06:18 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TokenDave to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sir Ferrari, DVCollector, Sap,

Thank you for the excellent lead on these coins and for the clarification on terminology.

TokenDave
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 Posted 08/03/2009  12:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TokenDave to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sir Ferrari, DVCollector, Sap,

With your lead, I was able to determine both coins to be Diocletian (Alexandria billon tetradrachm). The best part of attributing ancients is deciphering a combination of partially missing/distorted Latin and Greek letters -- sometimes for hours you see nothing and then the fog lifts and there it is -- plain as day! Thank you again.

TokenDave
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