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New Member

United States
9 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2009  5:38 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add TVetting to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I have recently been entrusted with my late father-in-laws collection. I'm in the process of sorting everything by category and there are a number of unopened mint sets in the original packaging. Does keeping the sets in the original unopened packaging add any value to them?
Valued Member
United States
51 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2009  5:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mainecoincoll to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
yes I would advise not taking them out of the sets
Valued Member
United States
53 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2009  6:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add rjbjjwsl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Unless you are experienced enough to recognize true gems, do not take them out. You need to keep in the original packaging and if you open any of the boxes, do it carefully so as not to tear the flaps.

Ooops, I just noticed that you said mint sets. They are probably not in boxes.
Edited by rjbjjwsl
09/15/2009 6:11 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
1771 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2009  6:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ratman4762 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Popular consensus on the forum is that the mint doesn't seal the mint sets! Humidity and time causes the envelopes to seal themselves. So opening them neatly probably wouldn't hurt. ( How else are you going to find out what treasures lay within?)
Bedrock of the Community
United States
14352 Posts
 Posted 09/15/2009  7:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Chances of there being treasures inside them is minuscule. Chances of getting stupid money for them on eBay from suckers who think there might be treasures in them is much better.

Are these sets that aren't opened or boxes of sets that are not opened? Because you can get even stupider money if the sets are still in the unopened shipping box.
Gary Schmidt
New Member
United States
9 Posts
 Posted 09/17/2009  09:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TVetting to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The sets are still sealed in the plain brown shipping boxes with just the UPC code on the outside. The only reason I know what they are is he bought multiple sets and opened one of them. At least I can figure out what they are from the number code by cross referencing the opened ones to the still sealed ones.

Does anyone know of a list of UPC barcode numbers and what US Mint products they represent? I wonder if I contact the mint if they would be able to help me....
Pillar of the Community
United States
6325 Posts
 Posted 09/17/2009  11:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add eaglefoot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Are you wanting to sell everything ?
Or just "identify" and "put a value" on everything ?
There's a big difference.
How large is this collection ?
How old are some of the oldest coins/paper that you have identified ?
What are the different types of coins that you've identified so far ?
Speaking of the "blister packs" or "Original Govt. Packaging" plastic cases, I would open NOTHING !......there's no point to doing that unless you're going to put them into something more airtight, which, done with each individual coin would be very time consuming.
But with the "cardboad box" packages.......yeah......I'd go ahead and open those myself......there are some who put a higher value on "unopened" boxes right from the Mint......but I don't....just the product inside and the unopened O.G.P containing the coins is of value to me.

But if this is important to you to leave them intact as they are.....

And yes.....if there are some recent purchases that your Father-in-law made,(last few years)... there are many CCF members who will know some of these codes, and can look on their packages, or their own files to tell you what's in there.
I kinda doubt that a phone call to the Mint will be of much help.
Moreso, a very studious CCF member might be able to provide a "list" or a "spreadsheet" of these identifing codes for ya ! ...ya never know. This is the best coin site in the world to gather information and learn from VERY knowledgable people.
Edited by eaglefoot
09/17/2009 11:50 am
New Member
United States
9 Posts
 Posted 09/17/2009  2:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TVetting to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
At this point I'm looking to catalog everything and assign a value to them. My father in law was a numismatic and an investment speculation collector. He would buy multiple sets or commemoratives in hopes that they would go up in value similar to the 1999 S Mark Silver Proof Set. I'm more of an artistic collector. I would like to retain some of it for myself, but I have multiple sets of the more recent mint and proof sets that I will eventually sell or trade off.

As for the original display packaging, I know better than to open the capsules or blisters the coins are actually in. What I'm asking about is the plain brown wrapper that a lot of the sets come in from the mint. All it has is the UPC code on the outside of it.

I haven't gotten too deep into the sorting and cataloging yet. I remember seeing some old coins here and there, but specific dates I don't know for sure yet. He did have a lot of Morgan dollars. Also a lot of recent silver eagles and pandas.

It will be a big task to go through it all, but little by little will get me there, and the learning along the way will be interesting...
Valued Member
United States
129 Posts
 Posted 09/17/2009  2:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add timer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you are going to sell the multiples, I would not open the boxes they were shipped in. You can verify what's inside by the product code. For example the 2005 mint set has a product code of U05 on the outside. If you can't figure out what's inside it sometimes helps to go to eBay and search for the product code. Some people list with this product code in the title. I also have to believe there is a site somewhere on the web that has all the product codes in one place. If not, it would be a neat little reference page to include on this site.

To put a "realistic" market value on the sets/coins I would look at the "greysheet" and/or the Bluebook. The greysheet can be found at http://www.greysheet.com . The Bluebook is a guide to what dealers may pay for coins/sets and can be found in the coin section of any decent bookstore. You can also search for completed listings on eBay for these items to get an idea of what eBay sales are yielding. If you do this don;t forget to subtract about 15% for eBay fees/paypal fees/shipping etc.

Pillar of the Community
United States
6325 Posts
 Posted 09/17/2009  3:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add eaglefoot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
For "identification" of coins or Sets on "any" year........I reccomend purchasing a 2010 Official RedBook of United States coins. This is the most widely used book by most coin collectors. It will have every coin minted by the U.S. Mint from "Colonial times" up to last year. But don't go by the "values" they put in it, only use it for all of the other great information contained in there and for simple easy coin/set identification purposes.

eBay (+ fees) would be a "real time" value of what anything is worth, as already mentioned, but I think that the "Blue Book" is really kind of too low on a lot of stuff....they have nearly the exact same information contained within. But, between the two, you could have a "middle range" of the value to your coins. They are available from $8.00 - $12.00 at any bookstore.

I believe "Greysheets" have to be "subscribed to" and you would have to ask a dealer for a sheet copy or whatever. I see Timer has a site to possibly get that from however....good info Timer !.....(I should have read your post before typing my reply ...)

But, either one of these two books (The Official RedBook of U.S. Coins (or the Blue Book) would gain you some much needed information.
They would not list the "product codes" however.

Let us know what Morgans you have and any other goodies you come up with !.......We all like to see pictures of cool coins !.
Edited by eaglefoot
09/17/2009 3:52 pm
New Member
United States
9 Posts
 Posted 09/17/2009  5:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TVetting to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good info to know. Thanks to both eaglefoot and timer for their input. I do have the 2009 RedBook now and was planning on using those values, but thanks to you guys I now have some more resources to get a better feel for the collections worth.

Once I really go through everything I'll start posting some pictures of what I've got. I'm sure there are some really great pieces in the collection here and there.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1571 Posts
 Posted 09/17/2009  6:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add livingdinasaur to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
To answer your original question, I believe you refer to the proof, and mint sets, that were shipped in. Most of them will open by themselves, due to time, and the evaporation of the "glue, ot contact cement they used in the mint so protect the set in shipment. The box, (cardboard) is nothing but a place to put the Prood set(s) that a part of the annual mintage. some are silver, some are clad, and aome are a mixture of the conglomerate. The 'container for the plastic holders for the actual coins is not meant to be opened, BUT, it happens! If a certain coin has been found to be of outstanding value, for whatever reason, or a coin has suffered something that detracts from the value in the set, it is removed. On the MINT sets, (wrapped in flexible celophane type material which is intended to keep the coin in a neutral atmosphere, to prevent oxidation, is not designed to be opened.
I would suggest you go through them, and NOT by category. Instead, go through the whole thing.ting what, and how many of each kund, IE, a bunch of coins in flips tell me that he had them in dates, or varieties, or errors, ot just date, w/o regard to Mint marks. that goeas for each deniomination. You will need lots of time, to do the inventory, properly, however, if you need the money, and have no inkling of what is there, then put it in the hands od an attribuitor, and get some idea of the value. it will make him turn over in his grave, to think of the work, and TLC, he opurt into the collection, just to se it go down the drain, by an heir, who could care less! Do I sound cynical? Yes, because I will leave my ciollection to omne of my Heirs, and none of them care a thing about coin collecting! You could also just take it to the bank, and exchange it forcash! At least it will eventually find it's way back into circulation, and many collectors will benefit. My two cents!
Dick
Valued Member
United States
129 Posts
 Posted 09/18/2009  10:21 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add timer to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Just a follow up note on the greysheet. This is avalable to anyone through http://www.greysheet.com . You can purchase one issue at a time or subscribe. They really don't change much from month to month. I get a new one about every six months. Single issues cost about $5.00. There are also quarterly supplements that cover dfferent types of coins. If you have coins graded by third party grading companies, like NGC or PCGS, take a look at the Bluesheet. And for currency, the greensheet is also available. They have package deals if you want to get a copy of all of the above. These are probably the most realistic guides to current market values. I agree that the Bluebook is on the low end...but probably realistic if you simply dump your collection at a dealer.
New Member
United States
9 Posts
 Posted 09/18/2009  2:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TVetting to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't need the money and I don't plan on squandering the collection to get the value out of it livingdinasaur. His method and philosophy of collecting and mine were just different. I appreciate what he has done and the time he has put into his collection, and I plan on retaining some of it for myself. I just don't need multiple sets of the same thing. In some cases he had 10 or 12 proof sets of the same year and was speculating that they would jump in value, or he was planning on using them for trading.

As for determining values I appreciate the link to the greysheet. I'll probably purchase them 1 at a time as a subscription seems a little excessive to me and a bit expensive.

I think I'll keep everything in the brown boxes for now and do my best to sleuth what's inside......

Thanks for the help and opinions....
New Member
United States
9 Posts
 Posted 09/18/2009  2:14 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TVetting to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One other thing. Anyone have a good source for a free collection Excel spreadsheet?
Bedrock of the Community
United States
16931 Posts
 Posted 09/22/2009  12:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Making an Excel spread sheet is simple. Just take your time and ask questions about it here as you go along. Just keep it simple. Make a column for dates, mints, quantity, face value and coin value.
As to the grey sheet for prices it is great but is rather confusing for a non coin person. If you can explain the Red Book is about 25% over on prices to everyone, everything in that book is rather clearer to the average individual which is why it is one of the reasons it is the largest selling coin book around.
I have one statement to make about what your doing. I've said this many times about getting involved in anything to do with estimating or cataloging a deceased relative, neighbor or friends coin collection. From experiences in this subject it usually ends up in a rather touchy situation. You mentioned a father-in-law. That is where the problems may start. Relatives on that side will always wisper how you tried to cheat them all. Relatives on your side will wonder too what is going on and who's side your on. If you should even mention purchasing that collection or selling it for them, they will surely wonder how your going to cheat them of a fortune. Also, not sure how your trusted but I wonder who would be the first to mention how your pocketing the really expensive coins.
Hopefully all family members on both sides are not like the usual ones for your sake.
just carl
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