Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest! Check out our Google+!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Foreign Coins Minted in the US  
 

Next Page | Last Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 3
New Member

United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/23/2010  3:21 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
More specifically, foreign coins produced at the Denver Mint in 1959 for coins to be released in 1960. If anyone has those types coins I would love to see or hear more about them. I did some research on Foreign Coins Manufactured at US Mints by Tim Ziebarth March 2006. According to the article here are some of the countries of interest; Haiti, El Salvador, Liberia, Panama, and Philippines Republic. There may be more that I am not aware of. Thanks for sharing, Mike
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
13276 Posts
 Posted 12/23/2010  11:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Denver and San Francisco Mints produced .925 sterling silver coins for Australia during the war years of 1942 '43 and '44, in Florin, Shilling Sixpence and Threepence denominations:

SF: 2/- '42,'43,&'44, 1/-'42,'43,&'44, 6d. '42,'43'44, 3d. '42,'43&'44.
Denver: 6d. '42&'43, 3d. '42&'43.

In addition, San Francisco produced Florins, Shillings and Sixpences for Fiji, in 1942 and 1943 in .900 fine silver. Interestingly, the standard fineness of Fijian silver at the time was only .500, but the SF coins only were in the higher grade silver.
Moderator
Learn More...
Australia
12696 Posts
 Posted 12/24/2010  02:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
...I did some research on Foreign Coins Manufactured at US Mints by Tim Ziebarth March 2006...

Download the article micmar is talking about here - 1.09 MB PDF file from pdxcoinclub.org.


Quote:
...foreign coins produced at the Denver Mint in 1959 for coins to be released in 1960...

As a general rule, mints put the date the coin is actually struck on them, rather than the date the coin is intended for issue. US coins dated 1960 were actually struck in 1960. That would be standard policy in US mints and would only change for foreign coins if the country which ordered the coins specifically requested it (as, for example, Ethiopian coinage, which was struck at Philadelphia between 1944 and 1962 all with the same date, 1944).

According to the Krause world coin catalogue, these are the stats for the countries you list:

Haiti: Philadelphia was the only mint listed. If Denver was used, Krause doesn't mention it.

El Salvador: Denver mint was only used in 1968 (for the 10 centavos).

Liberia: Denver mint was only used in 1972. Liberian coins of the 1960s are exactly the same size as US coins.

Panama: Mints not specified. Panamanian coins of the 1960s are exactly the same size as US coins, except for the 2½ centesimo which is smaller than a US cent.

Philippines: Denver mint was apparently only used 1944-45. Krause makes no mention of 1960s mints; I would assume al were struck in Manila.

So if you're looking for evidence that this might have been made using a foreign-intended collar die, I'm afraid there isn't any. Doesn't hurt to ask, though.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/24/2010  10:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sel & Sap Thanks for the input! I came across this article today. http://minterrornews.com/news-5-13-...he_mint.html
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/27/2010  7:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A interesting article I came across and would like to share;
Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: 1960 Large Date Cent on Korean 10 Hwan Planchet
Hi,
The coin weighs 2.5 grams, if I remember correctly.
Jon

On Friday, July 23, 2004, at 04:49 PM, Mike Diamond wrote:
Very interesting, Jon. I haven't heard of another.
According to "Domestic and Foreign Coins Manufactured by Mints of the
United States", the 10 Hwan weighs 2.46g, has the almost the same
composition U.S. cents of that area (95% Cu, but without any tin) and
has almost the same diameter as a cent (19.1mm vs. 19.05mm).
That being the case, how can anyone distinguish a cent struck on a 10
Hwan planchet from a cent struck on a rolled-thin planchet that
happens to approximate the weight of a 10 Hwan planchet?
How much does your coin weigh?
Some of you may remember my asking the group about a 1960 Lincoln
cent struck on a foreign planchet. Well, I just got it back from ANACS
and they confirmed what I thought it was, and have certified it as
being struck on a Korean 10 Hwan planchet. The coin is on a copper-
looking planchet, bit it is much thinner. The coin struck up fairly well,
and the details are mostly visible. If anyone wants to see the coin, it
is under the featured section of "U.S. Errors". It is interesting to
me because this is the first 1960 cent I've seen struck on a Korean 10
Hwan planchet.
Jon
This came from "Yahoo! Groups Links"
To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/error...ionexchange/

The link will take you through the whole discussion on the coin.
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/27/2010  7:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Article - "Will U.S. Mint Once Again Produce Coins For Other Countries?"
by; Richard Giedroyc - March 29, 2000
The Royal Canadian Mint, British Royal Mint, Pobjoy Mint, Franklin Mint, Royal Australian Mint, Valcambi Mint, Italian State Mint and others have one thing in common which is different from the U.S. Mint--each of them strikes coins under contract for foreign countries.
** The U.S. Mint last produced coins for a foreign country in 1984. Since that Time, our Mint has struck coins exclusively for the United States. This, in turn, paved the way for many foreign Mints to chase down these lucrative foreign coin contracts. The BRM is probably has the most foreign coin contracts of any of them. **
Now it appears this may all change once again. Legislation is pending authorizing the U.S. Mint to strike commemorative coins honoring explorer Leif Ericson, both for the United States and for Iceland. Who knows if this may encourage the U.S. Mint to once again actively solicit foreign coin production contracts, but it is a start.
Many people don't realize it, but due to the expense many countries do not own their own facilities to produce their coinage or their bank notes. Those countries that have these facilities routinely solicit the countries that do not, making a profit from this production.
In addition to government Mints and security printing facilities, there are a number of privately owned mints and security printing facilities that also solicit nations for contracts to produce their currency for them. The Pobjoy Mint in the United Kingdom is probably the largest private mint in operation today. The firm of Thomas de la Rue and others are privately-owned security printing facilities that print stocks, bonds, negotiable instruments and bank notes for many countries.
The U.S. Mint got into the foreign-coin-producing business in 1855, but did not have official authority to do so until The Mint Act of Jan. 29, 1874 was approved. There is no current legislation forbidding the U.S. Mint to produce foreign coins. Demand for U.S. coins has been so great since 1984 that the Mint has not had the resources to strike coins for other governments. Since that date, the Mint has been taxed with a significant number of commemorative and precious metal bullion coins to be produced.
In the past the United States has struck coins for Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Belgian Congo, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curacao, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Fiji, France, French Indo-China, Greenland, Guatemala, Hawaii, Honduras, Israel, Liberia, Mexico, Nepal, Netherlands, Netherlands East Indies, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, El Salvador, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Surinam, Syria, Taiwan, Thailand and Venezuela.
Information regarding paper money printing activities for foreign governments is more difficult to identify than are the coining activities of Mints. Many security printing organizations do not make public what they do or for whom they do it.
The U.S. Mint, like other Mints of today, actively pursued foreign coin production contracts from 1875 forward. The activities regarding foreign coin production by the U.S. Mint are chronicled in the annual Mint reports. Many of the Mints around the world now striking coins for other countries identify the countries for whom they strike in their annual reports. Unlike the earlier U.S. Mint reports, many of these foreign Mints do not identify the number of foreign coins produced.
Not all U.S. Mint-struck foreign coins carry U.S. Mint marks. Probably the best-known foreign struck coins carrying U.S. Mint marks are the early 20th century coins of the Philippines. The Manila Mint was opened in 1920 as a branch Mint of the United States. As such, its production figures are published in the contemporary U.S. Mint annual reports.
Richard Giedroyc is a numismatic writer, researcher, auction cataloger and coin dealer. He has been in the hobby and business most of his life, now having more than three decades experience in this fascinating hobby field. During this time Giedroyc has been the owner of Paris Bergman Galleries, owner of Classical Coin Newsletter, international editor of Coin World and owner of Giedroyc-Anderson Interesting World Coins. He is currently a numismatic consultant. He has written more than 2,000 byline numismatic stories and contributed to several coin catalogs.
Forum Dad
Learn More...
United States
18755 Posts
 Posted 12/27/2010  11:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bobby131313 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Not sure what your trying to prove with the foreign planchet theory. As far as I know planchets are irrelevant to reeding and I just looked at about 50 pictures of 10 Hwan coins and they don't have reeding.
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/27/2010  11:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
bobby131313
I did ask that of the writer of the article. I've had no reply, thanks...
Forum Dad
Learn More...
United States
18755 Posts
 Posted 12/27/2010  11:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bobby131313 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
What is there to ask? The reeding is imparted by the collar and the 10 Hwan coin does not have reeding.
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
13276 Posts
 Posted 12/28/2010  01:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have seen a silver Australian Florin (normally 28.5mm) struck on a silver wartime Nickel planchet (normally 21.2mm) from the SF Mint.

Dumpy, but not quite as dumpy as some people I know!
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/28/2010  10:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you read the whole article between Mike Diamond and Jon, Mike was steadfast in his belief that this coin error was not a coin error. That is if I read everything correctly. That was the only point bobby131313.
Forum Dad
Learn More...
United States
18755 Posts
 Posted 12/28/2010  11:05 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bobby131313 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm confused I guess. I don't see what any of what you've posted here has to do with what you're trying to prove. It's all irrelevant.
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/28/2010  11:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I found this article very educational, and would like to share. Follow the link below;
http://www.moonlightmint.com/artifacts.htm
Locked
822 Posts
 Posted 12/28/2010  11:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add scubu to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One interesting thing that I note is a photo of an actual working reeded collar....



It's quite obvious that the collar determines the diameter of the coin. This is not some flimsy piece of tin. It's also quite obvious that a cent planchet will not fit in a dime collar since the inside diameter of the collar would be exactly the diameter of a dime. This has all been said before but I thought maybe pictures would help.
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/28/2010  12:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
scubu I found all the pictures while researching on http://www.moonlightmint.com/artifacts.htm. I'm glad I was able to present you with some information of value. Shame no one else could provide pictures etc... Anyway I thought the article was very informative!
New Member
United States
38 Posts
 Posted 12/28/2010  12:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add micmar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
sel_69l The Australian Florin was one of the coins listed as being produced in the US along with the 3 pence, 6 pence and shilling.
Page: of 3 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Ending Soon   Newly Listed   Lowest Price   Highest Price   Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2017 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2017 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.78 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05