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5c & 10c (Nickels & Dimes?)

 
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Canada
8835 Posts
 Posted 03/20/2011  1:28 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add DBM to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Do Australians ever call their 5&10 cent coins nickels and dimes?
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Australia
1295 Posts
 Posted 03/20/2011  4:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add markn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
No.
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United States
3098 Posts
 Posted 03/20/2011  4:30 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wd1040 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Dime comes from the same French word as tithe - or tenth (then disme, and then dime). This was because the US dollar (or Canadian) was originally subdivided into a decimal system, so it made sense.

And nickel comes from the metal composition of the original base metal 5c.

Now for Aussie coins, it used to use the LSD system (Pounds, shillings, pence). During D Day (decimalization), 10 shillings (1/2 pound) was worth one new dollar, 5 shillings to the 50 cent... so each shilling was worth 10 new cents. In fact, the current sizes of the 10, 20c are the same size of the old legacy shilling, florin from Australia (and UK and NZ because they were pegged to each other).

So not trying to be an expert - but I would think if there were a legacy name for the 10c, 20c, it would be shilling/bob and florin/two bob
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Australia
1295 Posts
 Posted 03/20/2011  5:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add markn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
When I was a child (in the 70's) it was quite common to call a 20c two bob. Has dropped out of usage now though.
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Canada
8835 Posts
 Posted 03/20/2011  7:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add DBM to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The terms nickel,dime,and quarter emigrated to Canada from the US.I was wondering why "nickel" and "dime" didn't cross the Pacific.
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Cyprus
349 Posts
 Posted 03/21/2011  02:56 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Ozzie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
5cent and 10cent. That's what we call em. $2....called 2 bucks.....20c....2 bob.
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United States
9104 Posts
 Posted 03/21/2011  05:31 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add biggfredd to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
dbm -

oz was where GB shipped their criminiminals, so they were likely to use the GB terms.
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Australia
560 Posts
 Posted 03/21/2011  7:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Enlil to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A lot of these convicts were political prisoners and undesirables, and not criminals as suggested. We have only addopted the buck from U.S terminology for our currency, I don't know about grand though. We should have our own name for our currency though.
Formerly nancyc
Australia
5298 Posts
 Posted 03/21/2011  11:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nevol to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Do Australians ever call their 5&10 cent coins nickels and dimes?

Never ever!
life is a mystery to be lived not a problem to be solved
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Australia
2830 Posts
 Posted 03/22/2011  11:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Peter THOMAS to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
quote: "A lot of these convicts were political prisoners and undesirables, and not criminals as suggested."
- yeah, 99% of them gave the rest a bad name !

Over the 80 years of transportation, there was about a dozen batches of political transportees: some English; some Scots; some Irish; and some Canadians.

Peter in Oz


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Australia
560 Posts
 Posted 03/24/2011  12:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Enlil to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yer well the politicians and landowners of the time were criminals just the same, they just brought off the law.
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Australia
877 Posts
 Posted 03/24/2011  3:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Jeff to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There is a discussion here https://www.coincommunity.com/forum...ms=nicknames about Australian monetary nicknames.

Jeff
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Australia
27 Posts
 Posted 03/25/2011  03:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Blinky Bill to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
20c ....is still 2 bob too me
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Australia
27 Posts
 Posted 03/25/2011  03:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Blinky Bill to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
2x20c....is 4 bob old man! HaHa
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Australia
14263 Posts
 Posted 03/25/2011  06:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In the US, "dime" is the official name of the 10 cent coin; it says so right on the coin: "ONE DIME". The name was a legacy of the attempt to introduce a truly decimal (base 10) currency in the US: 10 cents to a dime, ten dimes to a dollar, ten dollars to an eagle. The dime is the only surviving legacy of this original system, with the US dollar now a de-facto centesimal currency system (100 cents to the dollar).

In Canada, the 10 cent coin was introduced at par with the US dime back in the 1800s, and circulated side-by-side with it for many years. Combine that with the common cultural links between the US and Canada and it was only natural that a coin the same size, weight and value would acquire the same name, albeit unofficially in Canada. Australia has never seen the US dollar in widespread circulation side-by-side with our own, and apart from a brief interaction during WWII there was virtually no cultural exchange with North America. So we have no such historical or cultural links that would see the nickname transferred here.

With regard to the nickel, it is a "nickname" on both sides of the US-Canadian border. The Canadians deliberately chose specifications similar to the US 5 cent coin when they introduced their cupronickel version of the 5 cents in the 1920s. So again, a similar sized coin circulating side-by-side would inevitably acquire the same nickname in Canada, and a quite dissimilar coin would not do so in Australia.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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