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Thin 2003 10 Cent Coin. Please Explain?

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 7 / Views: 457Next Topic  
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Australia
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 Posted 01/30/2022  11:22 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Seenbeen to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi All,

I found a very thin 2003 10 cent coin. See images below showing both faces and an image of it on top of a standard 10 cent coin. As can be seen from the images it is much thinner and its diameter is slightly smaller than a standard 10 cent coin.

I have had a brief look online (noting I have never researched coins before) and I was unable to find anything similar. I am rather curious what could have caused the coin to be so much thinner and if anyone has seen this before? I thought maybe it could be counterfeit but I am not convinced counterfeiting a 10 cent coin is worthwhile.

Thanks.



Edited by Seenbeen
01/30/2022 11:31 pm
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Australia
14375 Posts
 Posted 01/31/2022  12:18 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If a coin has generally "shrunk" in all dimensions (diameter and thickness) as this coin has, then the usual answer to how it was made, is: acid. A strong acid has corroded all the surfaces evenly, causing the coin to shrink while preserving the details on the surfaces.

No, I don't know what acid to use to make a cupronickel coin do this. Coca-cola will do this to bronze coins, but I don't think it's strong enough for cupronickel. You might need to upgrade to hydrochloric or something similar.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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Australia
2 Posts
 Posted 01/31/2022  12:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Seenbeen to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the response. Fascinating that acid can shrink the coin while still preserving the details.
Pillar of the Community
Australia
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 Posted 01/31/2022  03:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Basil to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


Interesting but could be anything including PMD.
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Australia
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 Posted 01/31/2022  05:23 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coaster to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Seenbeen and

Apparently electricity can be used to shrink a coin!
http://www.capturedlightning.com/fr...gallery.html



Edited by coaster
01/31/2022 07:38 am
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United States
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Australia
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 Posted 02/01/2022  04:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinanthebarb to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Apparently electricity can be used to shrink a coin!


Woah, that's really interesting!
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Australia
2014 Posts
 Posted 02/20/2022  01:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mr T to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Apparently electricity can be used to shrink a coin!


Fascinating.

But yeah probably acid - the reverse looks a bit pickled, more so that the obverse.
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