Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Help needed with this coin.

 
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1079 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  04:29 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add KLD to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi All,

I have done plenty of research into the history surrounding this coin. However I haven't been able to identify the metal used with this coin.

I am of the belief it is a commerative coin/ medallion from the UK to Hanover (I believe as a token of appreciation)

However I do not not know what kind of metal was used with it. It looks like it is gold to me but no sure.

Can anyone please help?

Lars



Valued Member
Australia
281 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  04:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add grendelfreak to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm no expert but it looks like copper rust (the green marks)
Valued Member
United States
230 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  05:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kuhli to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is a "To Hanover" token.

While they were used as game counter pieces and may have seen some circulation as tokens, these were also a political token.

When Queen Anne died in 1714, she did not have an heir to the throne. So a search through the family tree was made to find the closest suitable heir to the throne. This turned out to be George Louis great grandson of James I and King of Hanover, a German state. He became George I of England but retained his title to Hanover as well as did his successors George II, III, IV, and William IV. Salic Law did not permit a woman to be an heir to titles in Hanover when Princess Victoria succeeded to the British Throne in 1837 on the death of William IV. These titles, which had been held by kings of the United Kingdom since George I, therefore passed to the next male heir, Ernest Augustus, Duke of Cumberland.

He was unpopular in England and it was said that the scars on his face had been caused by his Corsican servant in self-defence, before the Duke murdered him. The Duke is believed to have committed other crimes and, to add to his unpopularity, he was opposed to Parliamentary reform and the emancipation of the Roman Catholics in this country.

Worst of all he had shown himself to be greedy for the British throne and to have opposed the succession of the people's beloved Victoria.

To express public pleasure at the Duke's departure, these TO HANOVER tokens were struck at various times over the next twenty years as a satirical gesture and for use as card players' counters or gaming tokens. The mounted figure on the reverse is the crowned Duke, who in most versions is shown with the face of a monkey.'
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1079 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  05:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add KLD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Kuhli, That was the same piece of history I un-covered.

I wasn't able to uncover the history of this token. Thankyou very much for that, I really do appreciate it.

I thought I had struck gold....haha maybe next time.

I must say though the coin colour is much lighter then expected from a copper coin?
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1079 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  05:52 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add KLD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
One thing I forgot to ask.

Are they common or harder to find? Do you know of a price? I know it is in poor condition.
Valued Member
Australia
281 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  06:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add grendelfreak to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
from this it looks like its brass, which has copper

http://www.24carat.co.uk/1837medall...andjack.html

EDIT: here are some To hanovers on Ebay, should be a good indicator.

http://coins.search.ebay.com/Hanove...QsacatZ11116
Edited by grendelfreak
01/21/2006 06:11 am
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1079 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  06:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add KLD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
AWESOME info there, thankyou. That answers all my questions.

I didn't think to search ebay.
Valued Member
United States
230 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  3:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kuhli to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have seen dozens of these over the years of searching eBay, ranging from ugly dark copper or bronze, to shiny brass, to the occasional (but uncommon) silver pieces. I have seen them dated 1837, 1838, 1897, and updated. The legends vary dramatically in both text and font. They range in size from as small as a US dime, to larger than a quarter (uncommon this large), normally range in the size between a US cent and a nickel. The standard common varieties tend to sell for the US$2-10 range.

Here is the only example I still have in my collection. Undated, with a longer obverse legend, and the reverse legend is "Off to Hanover"
Edited by kuhli
01/21/2006 3:07 pm
Valued Member
Australia
281 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  10:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add grendelfreak to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have a question about this coin, why does it have the St george squashing the dragon on the front (or back, can't work out which is which yet)?
Valued Member
United States
230 Posts
 Posted 01/21/2006  11:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kuhli to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
quote:
Originally posted by grendelfreak

I have a question about this coin, why does it have the St george squashing the dragon on the front (or back, can't work out which is which yet)?



Although it does mimic the "St. George slaying the dragon" theme used on sovereigns and other coinage, the design is actually something else. The figure on the horse is supposed to be the Duke of Cumberland, who went "to Hanover" to become the ruler that Victoria wasn't allowed to be. The dragon underneath is actually a 2-headed creature, which represents the dual kingship of Great Britain and Hanover, which ended when Victoria took the throne of Great Britain and the Duke took the throne of Hanover. Thus in 1837, we see (on obverse) Victoria, Queen of England, and (on reverse) the Duke of Cumberland, destroying the dual kingship and headed "to Hanover."
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1091 Posts
Valued Member
United States
236 Posts
 Posted 04/04/2006  10:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add habiru001 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Victoria appears to have been a providential choice for the throne as there were at least 4 others ahead of her- yet one by one they were removed until she was made the queen. She herself believed it to be providential- She was a very religious person-Britain became the most prosperous they had ever been under her rule- It was during her rule that the "Sun never set on the British Empire"
Habiru001
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1079 Posts
 Posted 04/04/2006  10:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add KLD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
She was just part of the right religion, according to the UK.
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.64 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05